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McDonalds closing ALL restuarants!.

edited March 22 in General Charlton
Even the drive thru service - surely this puts even more pressure on the supermarkets. I would have thought passing a paper bag through a hole in a wall would be fairly safe.
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Comments

  • Hal1x said:
    Even the drive thru service - surely this puts even more pressure on the supermarkets. I would have thought passing a paper bag over would be safe
    Why would you think that?
  • Chizz said:
    Hal1x said:
    Even the drive thru service - surely this puts even more pressure on the supermarkets. I would have thought passing a paper bag over would be safe
    Why would you think that?
    How much human contact is there?
  • What about their closeness to other staff ?
  • edited March 22
    MrOneLung said:
    What about their closeness to other staff ?
    So no work colleagues can work together full stop? In that case we need to close all the supermarkets too. Some economic life needs to place surely.
  • Hal1x said:
    Chizz said:
    Hal1x said:
    Even the drive thru service - surely this puts even more pressure on the supermarkets. I would have thought passing a paper bag over would be safe
    Why would you think that?
    How much human contact is there?
    There's human contact on cash. On the packaging that the food is placed in. On the paper bags that the containers are placed in. 

    A virus can survive on surfaces longer than a McDonald's can keep warm. 

    Kiosks in which McDonald's drive through staff are tiny and don't afford sufficient distancing from colleagues. 

    McDonald's will have made this decision based not just in the safety of their staff and customers, but on cost reduction due to a dramatic downturn in demand. 

    So, back to you. Why does the news that McDonald's are closing restaurants make you think that passing a paper bag over would be safe? 
  • edited March 22
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
  • Email I just got from McDonalds 

    Hi 

    I am incredibly grateful to our brilliant employees who have been working hard to continue to serve you safely in difficult circumstances.

    Over the last 24 hours, it has become clear that maintaining safe social distancing whilst operating busy takeaway and Drive Thru restaurants is increasingly difficult and therefore we have taken the decision to close every restaurant in the UK and Ireland by 7pm on Monday 23rd March.

    We have not taken this decision lightly and know that our restaurants have been playing an important role in the community providing hundreds of thousands of free drinks to frontline health and social workers and emergency services personnel.

    But I have been clear throughout this that we would only continue to operate whilst it was safe for our people and together with our franchisees, we feel now is the time to make this decision to temporarily close.

    We will be working closely with community groups across the UK and Ireland to distribute food from our restaurants to those most in need, and ahead of closing tomorrow evening, will ensure frontline health workers and emergency services personnel do not have to pay for any food or drink in our restaurants on sight of their work pass.

    I want to thank every single one of our 135,000 employees. I am so proud of them all for adapting so quickly to a constantly evolving work environment, taking every step to keep our customers, couriers and teams safe and looking after each other so very well.

    We will continue to update you thorough our website, social media channels and email alerts in the coming weeks but in the meantime we thank you for your continued support and custom.

    Take care of one another in these unprecedented times, we look forward to seeing you again as soon as it is safe for us to reopen.

    Paul Pomroy
    Chief Executive Officer, McDonald’s UK & Ireland 



    The part in bold answers your question @hal1x

  • From their Twitter account: "We will work with community groups to responsibly distribute food and drinks from our restaurants in the coming days".

    Sounds positive to me.
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  • Email I just got from McDonalds 

    Hi 

    I am incredibly grateful to our brilliant employees who have been working hard to continue to serve you safely in difficult circumstances.

    Over the last 24 hours, it has become clear that maintaining safe social distancing whilst operating busy takeaway and Drive Thru restaurants is increasingly difficult and therefore we have taken the decision to close every restaurant in the UK and Ireland by 7pm on Monday 23rd March.

    We have not taken this decision lightly and know that our restaurants have been playing an important role in the community providing hundreds of thousands of free drinks to frontline health and social workers and emergency services personnel.

    But I have been clear throughout this that we would only continue to operate whilst it was safe for our people and together with our franchisees, we feel now is the time to make this decision to temporarily close.

    We will be working closely with community groups across the UK and Ireland to distribute food from our restaurants to those most in need, and ahead of closing tomorrow evening, will ensure frontline health workers and emergency services personnel do not have to pay for any food or drink in our restaurants on sight of their work pass.

    I want to thank every single one of our 135,000 employees. I am so proud of them all for adapting so quickly to a constantly evolving work environment, taking every step to keep our customers, couriers and teams safe and looking after each other so very well.

    We will continue to update you thorough our website, social media channels and email alerts in the coming weeks but in the meantime we thank you for your continued support and custom.

    Take care of one another in these unprecedented times, we look forward to seeing you again as soon as it is safe for us to reopen.

    Paul Pomroy
    Chief Executive Officer, McDonald’s UK & Ireland 



    The part in bold answers your question @hal1x

    Fair enough then, but in that case we are truly buggered.
  • edited March 22
    Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket.
    Yes exactly so why add even further risk and probability of infection by doing it for far less necessary things like McFlurrys.

    Don't let the perfect be the the enemy of the good.


    Also with nando's and McDonald's closing it may reinforce the seriousness of it all to the younger generation whom (as we all probably were) may feel invincible. And maybe all the thickos that are yet to see the penny drop.
  • Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
    Do you? 

    The advice is to wash your hands when you return home from, for instance, shipping.  

    You seem to think it's a good idea to keep open a facility that allows you to have close contact with others, to handle food packaging that's been handled by one, two or more others, and offers no opportunity for customers to wash their hands before eating. 

    McDonald's may have taken this decision as a measure of safety. Can you really not see the benefit?
  • Stig said:
    From their Twitter account: "We will work with community groups to responsibly distribute food and drinks from our restaurants in the coming days".

    Sounds positive to me.
    Think that is about excess food and that will be going to those NHS on the front line and homeless shelters, rather than being thrown out
  • Stig said:
    From their Twitter account: "We will work with community groups to responsibly distribute food and drinks from our restaurants in the coming days".

    Sounds positive to me.
    Think that is about excess food and that will be going to those NHS on the front line and homeless shelters, rather than being thrown out
    Fair dos.
  • edited March 23
    Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
    When stuff is delivered to my house I now take it straight through to an outside shed where I leave it for a day or two depending on what it is and then go wash my hands.

    Sounds like fair play to McD's.  Also,less McD's may mean less Amazon destroyed...
  • Chizz said:
    Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.


    The advice is to wash your hands when you return home from, for instance, shipping.  


    Don't see what the merchant navy has to do with all this
    Oh shot
  • edited March 23
    .
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  • And the pollution risks faced by drive-through staff... McDonald's may have bought themselves some time to find a new position on that or maybe even implement some protection measures for staff..

    https://edm.parliament.uk/early-day-motion/55695/exposure-of-workers-in-drivethrough-restaurants-to-air-pollution
  • About time.

    Anything to do with coronavirus or just suddenly realised that they were all going to hell?
  • edited March 23
    If only supermarkets sold burgers and burger buns
    I’m loving it.
  • Well, something relating to Coronavirus that will not change my life at all.
  • Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
    When stuff is delivered to my house I now take it straight through to an outside shed where I leave it for a day or two depending on what it is and then go wash my hands.

    Sounds like fair play to McD's.  Also,less McD's may mean less Amazon destroyed...
     You leave it two days between hand washes?! 🤮😉
  • Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
    When stuff is delivered to my house I now take it straight through to an outside shed where I leave it for a day or two depending on what it is and then go wash my hands.

    Sounds like fair play to McD's.  Also,less McD's may mean less Amazon destroyed...

    Does anyone have any information about how long the virus can remain 'live' on packaging. Would plastic/cardboard, storage temperature etc make a lot of difference?
  • Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
    When stuff is delivered to my house I now take it straight through to an outside shed where I leave it for a day or two depending on what it is and then go wash my hands.

    Sounds like fair play to McD's.  Also,less McD's may mean less Amazon destroyed...

    Does anyone have any information about how long the virus can remain 'live' on packaging. Would plastic/cardboard, storage temperature etc make a lot of difference?
    Nobody knows for sure but it sounds like up to 24 hours for cardboard and 2-3 says for plastic/stainless steel. 
  • Dazzler21 said:
    My eldest son (17) works part time at Mcdonalds and has just been told he doesn’t have to go to work and he will be paid 80% of his wages despite not going in.  I say well done McDonald’s . Sensible decision 
    That was the government's plan, McDonald's have just accepted their idea and implemented it.

    Let's credit the government where it's due.
    Not just the Government's plan - it's paying the 80% as well.
  • Hal1x said:
    You do most of these things when you buy stuff from a petrol-station, corner shop or supermarket. A delivery man from Sainsbury’s either passes you a bag or a box, a cashier takes your cash and passes you carrier bags, can’t see the difference.
    When stuff is delivered to my house I now take it straight through to an outside shed where I leave it for a day or two depending on what it is and then go wash my hands.

    Sounds like fair play to McD's.  Also,less McD's may mean less Amazon destroyed...

    Does anyone have any information about how long the virus can remain 'live' on packaging. Would plastic/cardboard, storage temperature etc make a lot of difference?
    Here's a bit of info... 

    "...detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel". That's worth thinking about when you're pressing a plastic straw between your lips, to drink McDonald's milkshake from a plastic-coated paper cup, poured from a stainless steel dispenser.  More here: https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-coronavirus-stable-hours-surfaces 

    As I understand it, the virus can remain viable much longer on hard surfaces (e.g. a metal door handle) than on soft surfaces (e.g. a tissue).  
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