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E-Scooters

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  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    That has got nothing to do with the issues I raised has it. 

    It is a different argument,  and I agree with you on that point. It is equally dangerous and so is drinking and drug taking and then driving. 

    I think you are being wilfully  disingenuous by replying the way you have.


  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    What does that sentence even mean? Your vehicles pay tax? Which tax? How do they pay this tax?

    Instead of highlighting one particular incident (did you work out why this woman aimed at you? And I admire your ninja like qualities in preventing you, your grandson and the buggy from being hit in this deliberate attempt to mow you down), how about answering the points I raised above, rather than ignoring them?
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    Some cyclists are dangerous - I'm not sure why that is so contentious an issue for you? 
    Why only cyclists @hoof_it_up_to_benty ? Surely each mode of transport has it's fair share of idiots steering their particular vehicle?
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    That has got nothing to do with the issues I raised has it. 

    It is a different argument,  and I agree with you on that point. It is equally dangerous and so is drinking and drug taking and then driving. 

    I think you are being wilfully  disingenuous by replying the way you have.


    @addick1956. I think @baldybonce replied that way because you used a debate about the merits or otherwise of e-scooters to launch a woefully inaccurate attack specifically on cyclists.
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    That has got nothing to do with the issues I raised has it. 

    It is a different argument,  and I agree with you on that point. It is equally dangerous and so is drinking and drug taking and then driving. 

    I think you are being wilfully  disingenuous by replying the way you have.


    @addick1956. I think @baldybonce replied that way because you used a debate about the merits or otherwise of e-scooters to launch a woefully inaccurate attack specifically on cyclists 
    Thanks.
    yep, that’s about it.

    I’m in Poole at the moment where the rental of e scooters is a thing. I’ll find out more  o:)
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    What does that sentence even mean? Your vehicles pay tax? Which tax? How do they pay this tax?

    Instead of highlighting one particular incident (did you work out why this woman aimed at you? And I admire your ninja like qualities in preventing you, your grandson and the buggy from being hit in this deliberate attempt to mow you down), how about answering the points I raised above, rather than ignoring them?
     Not picking clearly.  Obviously I pay tax for my vehicle .  That is te operative tax here. Not to realise this is , well, frankly a bit dim. I know of know vehicle that pays tax. They do attract it though. 

    It was not a Ninja like escape . Being my Grandson indicates a gap of years that make such lively activities now a thing of the past. However  you in your supreme ignorance have belittled  the real peril I and my grandson were placed in , presumably by an unthinking uncaring relative of yours. 

    I have noted with great joy, that a contributor who works for the DVLA are looking into regularising cyclists and the new e - menace.  
    Apparently there is a weight measure to consider with such vehicles  35 Kg kerb weight.  As the rider adds considerable to the impact damage of these ' contraptions ' perhaps the weight of the rider could be added and bring such devises into DVLA radar. 
  • My great nephew has just been given an e-scooter for his 9th birthday.

    Given my very painful experience with his hoverboard, everyone is very keen on me trying it out,
  • cafcfan said:
    My great nephew has just been given an e-scooter for his 9th birthday.

    Given my very painful experience with his hoverboard, everyone is very keen on me trying it out,
    I hope he will be riding it on private land.
  • Sponsored links:


  • Sounds like we’re all wankers to me then 
    If the shoe fits...
  • I think they're brilliant, rented a few in Vienna and it made it so much easier to get around the city.

    But I can see how dangerous they can be and the rental schemes will, unfortunately, result in them cluttering the pavement making it harder for wheelchairs and prams to get by on the pavement.

    I'd love to get one for myself but I'm aware of annoying other people and if the police do pull you over (I've seen it happen a couple of times in London) I believe you get 6 points on your driving license.
    With the rental schemes, you have to dock them like the Santander bikes or you keep paying so they won't be cluttering the pavements.  It's the bikes from Lime and the like that do the cluttering.
    Have you got a link to this. As far as I can see lime say the scooters should be parked in designated bays but doesnt say anything about the user still being charged.

    Looks like lime can fine the last rider if it gets reported that the scooter was left in the middle of a path but thats about it.
    It’s possible I mis-interpreted the ‘marked bays’ bit in the Evening Standard article I read. 
  • Had one of these overtake me on my bike the other day, and I felt ashamed, assuming it was my fitness as it was the first time I'd cycled in a while. 

    Looked down at my speedometer, I was going at 22mph... And he didn't slowly go past me, zipped past. 
  • Huskaris said:
    Had one of these overtake me on my bike the other day, and I felt ashamed, assuming it was my fitness as it was the first time I'd cycled in a while. 

    Looked down at my speedometer, I was going at 22mph... And he didn't slowly go past me, zipped past. 
    Apparently they can be de-restricted by the yoof. I recently saw one doing about 30 with two young boys on hotly persued by the Police.
  • Huskaris said:
    Had one of these overtake me on my bike the other day, and I felt ashamed, assuming it was my fitness as it was the first time I'd cycled in a while. 

    Looked down at my speedometer, I was going at 22mph... And he didn't slowly go past me, zipped past. 
    Apparently they can be de-restricted by the yoof. I recently saw one doing about 30 with two young boys on hotly persued by the Police.
    If only we could restrict the yoof with a mechanism like that on the e scooters. 
  • cafcfan said:
    My great nephew has just been given an e-scooter for his 9th birthday.

    Given my very painful experience with his hoverboard, everyone is very keen on me trying it out,
    I hope he will be riding it on private land.
    Well, he's in Northern Ireland. There might be different laws - there often are. Frankly, I doubt he'll stick to his own lands. He's already been zooming around a caravan park.

    I'm pretty sure he'll be using the scooter to visit his mate which will involve a 200 yards or so dash along a back road.  But then he's also out on his horse on the same road and in that case you are reliant upon a walnut-sized brain to understand what is going on rather than a human one.  And people ride on those things!?  The encephalization quotient of a horse is about 0.78, even a domestic cat's is 1.0; whereas a human's is 7.8*.

    * A lot less for Millwall supporters obviously. 

    But then there's the general rule of thumb about NI:  they are happy to do anything as long as it is illegal and/or dangerous.  Sadly this is an all too typical incident  https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/ballycastle-tractor-crash-tragedy-miracle-as-five-year-old-hannah-smyth-returns-home-after-three-months-in-hospital-39450514.html

    The home of potcheen and red diesel is not going to care about e-scooter legislation.  


  • Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

  • clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    What happens to them? I'm unclear whether all the businesses selling them do a thorough check on whether they will be used legally?

    We have a vehicle document so why not one for scooters?
  • clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    What happens to them? I'm unclear whether all the businesses selling them do a thorough check on whether they will be used legally?

    We have a vehicle document so why not one for scooters?
    Exactly! I don't understand why/how it is so easy to buy them if they can only be used legally off road (which must be rare in the scheme of things) or if hired
  • clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    What happens to them? I'm unclear whether all the businesses selling them do a thorough check on whether they will be used legally?

    We have a vehicle document so why not one for scooters?
    Exactly! I don't understand why/how it is so easy to buy them if they can only be used legally off road (which must be rare in the scheme of things) or if hired
    It almost suggests the government haven't thought this through.
  • Sponsored links:


  • clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    Told off and given a note for their parents in Sidcup


  • Wilma said:
    clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    Told off and given a note for their parents in Sidcup


    Should be an immediate confiscation.
  • clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    What happens to them? I'm unclear whether all the businesses selling them do a thorough check on whether they will be used legally?

    We have a vehicle document so why not one for scooters?
    Exactly! I don't understand why/how it is so easy to buy them if they can only be used legally off road (which must be rare in the scheme of things) or if hired
    Slack Alice government.  If it is not approved for UK roads first it should not be on them but is there a system in the first place ? 

  • Wilma said:
    clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    Told off and given a note for their parents in Sidcup


    Should be an immediate confiscation.
    It's okay - I'm sure they told PC Dan they'll never use them again.
  • Wilma said:
    clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    Told off and given a note for their parents in Sidcup


    'Pushed their scooter home'

    Yeah, OK mate.

    Through the park gates, wnker sign and hopped on and ridden through the estate
  • clive said:

    Police say they removed more than 500 e-scooters from the streets of London last week.

    Officers confiscated 507 of the contraptions during "proactive patrols" across all boroughs.

    The "week of action" was triggered by the increased usage of uninsured e-scooters in London, police said.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57609088

    What happens to them? I'm unclear whether all the businesses selling them do a thorough check on whether they will be used legally?

    We have a vehicle document so why not one for scooters?
    They are being collected in a location and can be reclaimed for a fee. Same as when a car ends up in the pound.
  • The real problem isn’t the cycles, e-scooters etc it’s the people using them. Most folks have a brain, so far it seems that the majority of cyclists are clued up but when it comes to e-scooters it’s about 50/50. 


  • London e-scooters could be '100 times more dangerous than bicycles'
    https://www.mylondon.news/news/london-e-scooters-could-100-20662660

    E-scooters 'are 100 times more dangerous than bicycles', admit transport chiefs - as trials for the vehicles begin in London next month. Electric scooter trials will begin in London next month – despite an admission by transport chiefs that they could be 100 times more dangerous than bicycles.22 May 2021
  • As annoying as they are, I really don't see the difference between them and the electric bikes flying around. Some of those bikes are super quick and surely come under the same laws as the scooters.
  • Rob7Lee said:
    As annoying as they are, I really don't see the difference between them and the electric bikes flying around. Some of those bikes are super quick and surely come under the same laws as the scooters.
    It's legal to use electric bikes but there are regulations in place and they are supposed to be speed limited. I imagine this will just be another problem.


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