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E-Scooters

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  • So if the only legal way to use one is through a rented scheme, why are they available to be bought?

    With apologies to anyone on here who uses on legally and safely, my experience of them so far seems to be 99% of the users are reckless and exactly the antithesis of the sort of person who would use one sensibly and safely.
  • City of London will be absolute carnage when the e-scooters are there come July. Can you imagine all the pissed up birds falling out of brunches at Coya/The Ned/Ivy Asia and jumping on those?

    should at least make for some entertaining viewing
  • I think they're brilliant, rented a few in Vienna and it made it so much easier to get around the city.

    But I can see how dangerous they can be and the rental schemes will, unfortunately, result in them cluttering the pavement making it harder for wheelchairs and prams to get by on the pavement.

    I'd love to get one for myself but I'm aware of annoying other people and if the police do pull you over (I've seen it happen a couple of times in London) I believe you get 6 points on your driving license.
  • edited June 8
    I think they're brilliant, rented a few in Vienna and it made it so much easier to get around the city.

    But I can see how dangerous they can be and the rental schemes will, unfortunately, result in them cluttering the pavement making it harder for wheelchairs and prams to get by on the pavement.

    I'd love to get one for myself but I'm aware of annoying other people and if the police do pull you over (I've seen it happen a couple of times in London) I believe you get 6 points on your driving license.
    I think they can/could be brilliant - saw them used in Zurich but by the very rule adhering, sensible Swiss

    6 points on your driving licence a disincentive to being reckless but not if you have no intention of driving unfortunately, as is probably the case of many of the worst users in inner cities, especially if they can use an e-scooter. Haven't seen the crime figures recently but expect a lot of the moped type crime transferred to e-scooters; unfortunately an even better option for the perpetrators  


  • I think they're brilliant, rented a few in Vienna and it made it so much easier to get around the city.

    But I can see how dangerous they can be and the rental schemes will, unfortunately, result in them cluttering the pavement making it harder for wheelchairs and prams to get by on the pavement.

    I'd love to get one for myself but I'm aware of annoying other people and if the police do pull you over (I've seen it happen a couple of times in London) I believe you get 6 points on your driving license.

    addick19 said:
    The s**t will hit the fan when a pedestrian is killed or seriously injured. For a country that is 'elf and safety mad this situation, where no one appears to know what is and what isn't against the law, is beyond parody. If one of them comes near me on the pavement he's likely to end up on his arse.
     Only if you have a driving license and the yoof round here don't seem to have an identity even , let alone something with their Monica on it .
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
    Add to the mix the rise in  number of moped riding food delivery riders who seem to have never seen a highway code and we'll have a summer of carnage,
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
  • Sponsored links:


  • A visually impaired woman from London says e-scooters are not safe enough to be used across the city as they do not have audible signals.

    The signals, which alert pedestrians to the silent e-scooters, will not be installed for at least two months.

    Transport for London (TfL) said in May the e-scooters would have audible warning systems that could be used without riders adjusting their grip.

    It now says that all e-scooters on the rental scheme are fitted with bells.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-57293438

  • stonemuse said:

    SINGAPORE - Mandatory theory tests for e-scooter and electric bicycle riders will begin from the middle of this year, Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Transport Baey Yam Keng said on Friday (March 5).

    This will ensure all riders of such motorised devices know the prevailing rules and codes of conduct, he said during the debate on his ministry's budget.

    In another move to improve safety, Mr Baey said all bicycles used on public paths and roads will also be required to have at least one functioning handbrake, with effect from September.

    According to an article in last Friday's Standard, you need a driving licence and insurance to use them in the UK.
  • I think they're brilliant, rented a few in Vienna and it made it so much easier to get around the city.

    But I can see how dangerous they can be and the rental schemes will, unfortunately, result in them cluttering the pavement making it harder for wheelchairs and prams to get by on the pavement.

    I'd love to get one for myself but I'm aware of annoying other people and if the police do pull you over (I've seen it happen a couple of times in London) I believe you get 6 points on your driving license.
    With the rental schemes, you have to dock them like the Santander bikes or you keep paying so they won't be cluttering the pavements.  It's the bikes from Lime and the like that do the cluttering.
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    Some cyclists are dangerous - I'm not sure why that is so contentious an issue for you? 
  • I don't understand why parents are buying these scooters for their children, last night I saw several kids riding them along the path past my house.  Most of the properties have walls or hedges and so even when you slowly emerge from your drive, you may not see them whizzing past until is is too late. I suppose it will take a few of them to be seriously injured or killed before anything is done to stop this. These scooters are an accident waiting to happen. 
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    Car drivers on their 'phones, breaking the speed limit, etc. are wankers.  Cyclists on the pavement, jumping red lights, etc. are also wankers.  Less likely to cause death and mayhem, true, but wankers none the less.
  • Sounds like we’re all wankers to me then 
  • Crossing the lights on a green man up London will now become even more fun with the little scrotes whizzing through on these.
  • I've seen a fair few souped up e-scooters lately. They look big and heavy and go much faster than the 14-15 mph they are supposed to be limited to. Just yesterday in Burgess Park, Southwark, I saw two travelling close to 30mph on crowded paths, with toddlers and dogs dotted all around. Some cyclists can be as bad, but they are unlikely to travel consistently at 25mph+ and don't have anywhere near the weight these scooters do. I can see a small child being killed by one before long.
    The scooter itself isn't the problem, much the same with bikes and motor vehicles, it's the idiots on/in them. Unfortunately, these things are idiot magnets!
    Like most cyclists these morons believe the rules don't  apply  to them. No insurance,  no rules, no crash helmets no registration  plates. And no intention  to pay for anything towards the highways they abuse.
    Speaking as a cyclist, pedestrian and car driver, I can't quite believe how much you have got wrong in such a short paragraph! It's full of lazy assumptions and factually incorrect statements. I credit you with decent spelling and punctuation though.

    1) People are not morons because they're cyclists, pedestrians or scooter riders. They are morons because they are morons. Many of these people are also drivers. Do they automatically stop being morons just because they are using four wheels instead of two?

    2) Most cyclists do follow the rules of the road to a large degree. As with careless/dangerous drivers, we only notice the ones who break the rules and endanger others, though at least they aren't travelling in at least a ton of metal that can reach speeds of up to 100mph.
    Unless you keep rigorously to the speed limit at all times, know the Highway Code inside out, always wear your seat belt, check your mirrors before making any manoeuvre (including opening your door to get out of the car), never check your phone while driving (even when queuing), drive with both hands on the steering wheel at all times, etc.............. then you are breaking the rules as much as any of these "moronic" cyclists. Lets face it, at times, we can all be morons when on the road. It's just a question of degrees, and the likely consequences.

    3) Many cyclists are insured. Mine is through London Cycling Campaign membership. other cycle organisations such as Cycle UK also insure members, and individuals can get their own insurance privately too. It isn't a legal requirement for a cyclist to be insured, quite possibly because the percentage of injuries to others caused by a cyclist is absolutely minimal. 

    4) I always wear a helmet on the road. Others don't, but it isn't a legal requirement. Again, by not wearing a helmet, a cyclist is not going to harm others, only be more at risk themselves.

    5) Registration plates are not a legal requirement for cyclists, much in the same way as they aren't for pedestrians, who are equally likely to be involved in/cause an accident on the road by doing things like crossing without looking.

    6) Every cyclist, e-scooter rider, pedestrian, driver, and anyone else who pays income tax, pays towards the upkeep of the roads. I guess you're thinking of Road Tax, which was abolished in the 1930s and was subsequently superseded by a vehicle tax based on emissions. I'm sure you will agree that cyclists don't produce polluting emissions unless they have recently consumed a dodgy takeaway. 

    I won't even get started on the health and environmental benefits of cycling, walking, and to a lesser degree, scooting. If you ever decide to take up cycling, I'm a qualified instructor and will offer you a Charlton supporter discount as well as a life changing experience.


    I frequently see cyclists breaking the highway code in London because they're in a position to do so and know they won't get pulled up on it. It's a sizable minority but fortunately the transgressions don't normally end up in accidents. You see red lights being jumped all the time and a minority have no road sense.

    The problem with the London road network is it's not really set up for motorists and cyclists to share the same space.

    What the impact of e-scooters will be remains to be seen. 
     I totally agree. Later week in Lewisham I was crossing a controlled crossing .I was pushing our 9 month old grand son in a pushchair.  Behind us a woman was pushing her child.   A woman on a cycle decided to aim at us causing me to nearly stumble in the effort  to get out of the way. She had cycled between cars to jump red lights. On her cycle were two seats for children one on the handle bars and one over the rear wheel.

    This is common with cyclists who know that if they stop they have to use more energy to move off again. 

    Our vehicles are registered and so pay tax also. Cyclists aren't and e scooters are even worse.

    When cyclists follow the rules and also stop cycling up the inside of vehicles by the keeb etc everyone  will be safer.
    Blah blah blah cyclists. When i never see a car driver on their phone everyone will be safer.
    Some cyclists are dangerous - I'm not sure why that is so contentious an issue for you? 
    I'm 64, have never driven, always cycled. 
    Some cyclists are dangerous, lots of car drivers are dangerous, pedestrians staring at their phones and crossing the road are dangerous.
  • Crossing the lights on a green man up London will now become even more fun with the little scrotes whizzing through on these.
    The government and police are on top of it.

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  • Crossing the lights on a green man up London will now become even more fun with the little scrotes whizzing through on these.
    Using your phone will become dangerous, highly likely the scooters will be used for ride past grabs like bikes /mopeds but with a silent approach.
  • I predict that E scooters will be made legal within the next 18 months.

    Then I suspect it will be only a short time before only electric vehicles will be allowed in major Cities.

  • What we need is little like electric bumper cars or quad bikes.  for on the road and then all the roads can have 2 lanes either side. Half the congestion in one go. 
  • Upset all these Chelsea tractor toss pots that think they own the road though. 
  • I don't understand why parents are buying these scooters for their children, last night I saw several kids riding them along the path past my house.  Most of the properties have walls or hedges and so even when you slowly emerge from your drive, you may not see them whizzing past until is is too late. I suppose it will take a few of them to be seriously injured or killed before anything is done to stop this. These scooters are an accident waiting to happen. 
    Most of the people I see whizzing around kn them in Bexleyheath look about 15 and unsurprisingly they act like morons on them. They're weaving all over the road or up on the pavements. Incredibly dangerous and not dissimilar to the other kids you see doing wheelies on their bikes down the middle of the road. Its an accident waiting to happen unfortunately.

    Cars, bikes and scooters would all be fine if some people weren't arseholes the second they start using them.
  • I think they're brilliant, rented a few in Vienna and it made it so much easier to get around the city.

    But I can see how dangerous they can be and the rental schemes will, unfortunately, result in them cluttering the pavement making it harder for wheelchairs and prams to get by on the pavement.

    I'd love to get one for myself but I'm aware of annoying other people and if the police do pull you over (I've seen it happen a couple of times in London) I believe you get 6 points on your driving license.
    With the rental schemes, you have to dock them like the Santander bikes or you keep paying so they won't be cluttering the pavements.  It's the bikes from Lime and the like that do the cluttering.
    Have you got a link to this. As far as I can see lime say the scooters should be parked in designated bays but doesnt say anything about the user still being charged.

    Looks like lime can fine the last rider if it gets reported that the scooter was left in the middle of a path but thats about it.
  • On the run up to Christmas and lambing season finished Kent OB are clamping down hard on the wrong’uns. 😉
  • T_C_E said:
    On the run up to Christmas and lambing season finished Kent OB are clamping down hard on the wrong’uns. 😉
    At least he didnt have his dog with him.


  • So if the only legal way to use one is through a rented scheme, why are they available to be bought?

    With apologies to anyone on here who uses on legally and safely, my experience of them so far seems to be 99% of the users are reckless and exactly the antithesis of the sort of person who would use one sensibly and safely.
    Because they are only illegal to use on public roads.  (A lot of places are deemed to be covered by that definition if the public has access to them, like a caravan site or a Tesco car park, for example)

    So, you can trundle one around your own garden or whatever.

    I guess there must be a whole host of things that can be bought and used at home but might get you into trouble in a public place, like knives and BB guns for example.
  • cafcfan said:
    So if the only legal way to use one is through a rented scheme, why are they available to be bought?

    With apologies to anyone on here who uses on legally and safely, my experience of them so far seems to be 99% of the users are reckless and exactly the antithesis of the sort of person who would use one sensibly and safely.
    Because they are only illegal to use on public roads.  (A lot of places are deemed to be covered by that definition if the public has access to them, like a caravan site or a Tesco car park, for example)

    So, you can trundle one around your own garden or whatever.

    I guess there must be a whole host of things that can be bought and used at home but might get you into trouble in a public place, like knives and BB guns for example.
    Yes, I guess so, but many people have or access to the land to use one and I would have thought the majority are being used where (and how) they shouldn't be.

    I understand the Met confiscate an average of 4 a day
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