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Sam Bartram Interview - from 1981



The cup finals and the ball not bursting both times
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Comments

  • Crazy that he died just two months after this video... Did he die of anything in particular seeing he was only 67?
  • Allegedly my Nans pin up boy!

    How times have changed, brill cream and no fake tan in sight.
  • Thanks for posting. I've been looking for interviews from Sam in his later years but had failed. First time hearing himspeak, still a bit of a north east accent but not much...sad that he passed away so soon after.

    What was his relationship with the club like in later years - is there any record in the museum?

    I'd loved to have known his thoughts on Charlton at that time, dipping in and out of the 3rd division in front of tiny crowds...

  • Thanks for posting. I've been looking for interviews from Sam in his later years but had failed. First time hearing himspeak, still a bit of a north east accent but not much...sad that he passed away so soon after.

    What was his relationship with the club like in later years - is there any record in the museum?

    I'd loved to have known his thoughts on Charlton at that time, dipping in and out of the 3rd division in front of tiny crowds...
    First time I’ve heard him speak too. Much less strong north eastern accent than Jimmy Seed.
  • Great find that. Would have loved it for the centenary video.
    That's what I thought @Airman Brown

    Not sure what the interview was for but sounds like a film about the FA Cup, not Charlton.
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  • I think perhaps his accent had softened after years down South
  • edited October 15
    I think perhaps his accent had softened after years down South
    That’s true, but JS always hung on to his. Apart from the five or six years in Sheffield, he spent the last 46 years of his life living in and around London, but his accent never seems to have changed at all. I think the fact that his wife was also a mackem was a factor. Sometimes it was like they had their own language. 
    Didn’t Sam marry a local girl? On a match day?!
  • Always a typo mistake on the records.

    Sam was born in Harrow, not Jarrow.
  • Great bit of film, I've never seen that before. I was surprised by his voice, I always imagined it would be gruffer and more Geordie. It sounded to me though more like a male version of Lynn Benfield (Alan Partridge's PA). 

    It was the People he wrote for. My dad used to have the People and the Mirror every Sunday. Soon after Sam died, that stopped and he just had The Mirror. I'm not sure it was because Sam was a great journalist, more a sense of Charlton loyalty I think.
  • I too was expecting more of a North East Accent.  I will have to re read his autobiography now. 
  • I met him after the Gillingham promotion game in 1981. He was happily giving autographs to a new generation of fans. 
  • Thanks Ben that was magical to hear the great man speak. I always thought he would have a strong accent so it was such a surprise to hear him. He was also much more softly spoken than I imagined. I thought he would have a deep booming voice.

    Sam was the first footballer I heard about growing up in the 1970s, even though he was long since retired. That was thanks to my dad, as Sam was the only player he could name. I always wondered how Sam could make such an impression on someone who had no real interest in the game. When I got involved in the Bartram statue centenary schools project I found out through researching his story what a local icon he was. A genuinely lovely man who touched many hearts.

     Hearing Johnny Jackson's interview this morning you realise how important it is to have people like this around the club.  After ESI it's easy to fall out of love with the game. People like Sam and Johnny more than make up for the Southalls and Elliott(tt)s of this world.
  • Also spoke with Sam on a few occasions at that sports shop
    Always overawed because he was a hero to kids following the Addicks. 
    He really was a very good keeper - ahead of his time and liked throughout the game. Nevertheless a showman by instinct which might explain his lack of International recognition 
  • That's a super find. Can certainly hear a bit of a NE twang. Wish it went on longer. 

    I find it very sad that I was going to The Valley from the early to mid 70s but never knew I could have met Sam. We always approached from the east side and went straight to the East Terrace.

    It's a bit different nowadays that players are more superficially accessible via social media etc. But I'd still say to youngsters to go and seek out the likes of Bob Bolder and Colin Walsh in person when you have the chance.
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  • Great stuff thanks Ben :)
  • That film is very special for me. 

    I grew up on stories from my father of the great Sam Bartram catching the ball then dribling down the wing.

    When I was around 10 years old dad took me to my first game, saying it was the last game for the famous player.

    Unfortunately I couldn't see much and truth be told didn't enjoy it!
    Five years later I returned and fell in love with the whole experience.

    My father's long gone but I still remember the admiration he had for the ' greatest goalkeeper never to play for England ' and the effect that had on a 10 year old kid.
    I got his autograph as a child, maybe 7 or 8, on my season ticket.

    My dad told me to go and get it and I remember shyly approaching this giant of a man.

    What I'd give to have that autograph now.
  • Chizz said:
    I'm going to send that second one to my Portuguese-speaking acquaintance.

  • Thanks for posting that.

    Given that Motty interviewed him it must have been on the BBC at some stage but I've never seen it before.
  • It’s very strange hearing him for the first time. I always thought he’d have a big Northern voice like Mick McCarthy type.
    would love to hear more of that video
  • Reading a biography on him, he seemed like a real character loved and respected by all football fans. It was common for him to make runs up the pitch and they didn't always end well, which probably prevented his England chances outside of war internationals. I would have loved to see him play.
  • He seems to be suggesting that the burst ball could have led to a drop ball on the goal line. What a strange rule
  • I have his autograph which I plan to put into a frame (for me, not for sale) when I am happy with the design.
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