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How many holes does a straw have?

Apparently there are arguments for none (or it'd leak), one (big hole down the middle), or two (each end, obviously).

What do you think?
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Comments

  • No holes in a straw, it’s a hollow cylinder.


    The winner.
  • No holes in a straw, it’s a hollow cylinder.

    Or maybe it’s a wrapped circular void? 
  • No holes in a straw, it’s a hollow cylinder.
    If that is the case, neither a polo mint or a hulahoops have holes either.
  • PopIcon said:
    No holes in a straw, it’s a hollow cylinder.
    If that is the case, neither a polo mint or a hulahoops have holes either.
    Incorrect. They punch a hole in a polo. 

    A hula hoop is a hollow cylinder too. 
  • It seems that the mathematically correct answer is one.
  • Topology tells us it’s 1. Same as a doughnut.
  • No holes in a straw, it’s a hollow cylinder.

    No one likes a smart arse.🤔
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  • Is a straw like a worm? If I cut it in two, will both pieces still work?
  • Dazzler21 said:
    PopIcon said:
    No holes in a straw, it’s a hollow cylinder.
    If that is the case, neither a polo mint or a hulahoops have holes either.
    Incorrect. They punch a hole in a polo. 

    A hula hoop is a hollow cylinder too. 
    I'm no expert, but are you saying a polo mint isn't a hollow cylinder (albeit flat and girthy)?
  • I've been told all my life, that Polo mint is ...

    Orignal POLO advertising web
  • Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
  • PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    Quite a few.

    The difference is that, to make the colander, several small bits of metal will have been removed.  Therefore the use of the term 'hole' is quite legitimate.

    You can, of course, have a hole in a straw.  Just puncture the continuous curved surface.  Such a straw will not be too useful, though.
  • Seven. Anyone willing to give me £5 if I'm wrong?
  • I've been told all my life, that Polo mint is ...

    Orignal POLO advertising web
    People were once told the earth was flat. 
    I prefer the torus shape mint
  • edited June 8
    • Nestlé’s Consumer Services team receives hundreds of calls a year about Polo. Favourite question is what the factory does with the middle of the Polos. The answer is that there never is a middle, each Polo is made with a hole in it.
    • The pressure Polo is put under when formed is 75 kilonewtons, which is equivalent to the weight of two elephants jumping on it.

    Based on my proposed definition (that the term 'hole' can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be), it would appear that there is no hole in a Polo mint.

    It looks like Rowntrees, and subsequently Nestlé, have been fooling us for years.

    Outrageous.  I will never suck the toroidal confection again.
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  • PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
  • Fuck this is going to bother me all day.

    If I'm being honest, two. 
  • PaddyP17 said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
    Schoolboy error, PaddyP17.

    There used to be matter there … and that has subsequently been removed in order to produce the colander.  Hence we have a hole (or several holes, in fact).

    I'm surprised that you missed this point.  It's fairly obvious really … but I forgive you.  
  • Dave Rudd said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
    Schoolboy error, PaddyP17.

    There used to be matter there … and that has subsequently been removed in order to produce the colander.  Hence we have a hole (or several holes, in fact).

    I'm surprised that you missed this point.  It's fairly obvious really … but I forgive you.  
    How many holes do you need in a bowl for it to become a colander?
  • addix said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
    Schoolboy error, PaddyP17.

    There used to be matter there … and that has subsequently been removed in order to produce the colander.  Hence we have a hole (or several holes, in fact).

    I'm surprised that you missed this point.  It's fairly obvious really … but I forgive you.  
    How many holes do you need in a bowl for it to become a colander?
    Excellent question, addix.

    I'm no colander expert, but I imagine that, to call yourself a colander goes way beyond the number of holes.  The size and position of the holes are clearly crucial.

    But, at the risk of appearing foolish, two holes must be the minimum, although more is preferred.  And I don't need to state the obvious, do I?  Not all bowls with two holes are colanders.

    That would be ridiculous.
  • None, one or two... however many holes a straw has, it’ll be less holes than are in @PopIcon ’s Chris Powell argument.
  • Dave Rudd said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
    Schoolboy error, PaddyP17.

    There used to be matter there … and that has subsequently been removed in order to produce the colander.  Hence we have a hole (or several holes, in fact).

    I'm surprised that you missed this point.  It's fairly obvious really … but I forgive you.  
    Except a plastic colander, being moulded, never had matter there. 
  • Dave Rudd said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
    Schoolboy error, PaddyP17.

    There used to be matter there … and that has subsequently been removed in order to produce the colander.  Hence we have a hole (or several holes, in fact).

    I'm surprised that you missed this point.  It's fairly obvious really … but I forgive you.  
    Except a plastic colander, being moulded, never had matter there. 
    From which we conclude that there are no holes in a plastic colander.

    It's not difficult, is it?
  • Dave Rudd said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    PaddyP17 said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    If a hole is defined as an absence of matter, the term can only be applied where we are certain that matter should be.

    I submit that the straw is simply a continuous curved surface and that no matter ever existed or was intended to exist within the confines of the aforementioned continuous curved surface.

    Therefore, there is no hole, there never was a hole.  A straw has no hole.
    How many holes does a colander have then?
    But you talk about "where matter should be" - and there shouldn't be matter where the holes are in the colander!

    ... Why has quarantine got me like so
    Schoolboy error, PaddyP17.

    There used to be matter there … and that has subsequently been removed in order to produce the colander.  Hence we have a hole (or several holes, in fact).

    I'm surprised that you missed this point.  It's fairly obvious really … but I forgive you.  
    Except a plastic colander, being moulded, never had matter there. 
    From which we conclude that there are no holes in a plastic colander.

    It's not difficult, is it?
    Just clarifying colanders  can have holes and no holes.
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