Attention: Please take a moment to consider our terms and conditions before posting.

The English Game - Netflix

Dramatisation of 1880s football and the clash between upper class amateurs and working class professionals.

Series on Netflix now.

For anyone watching Lord Kinnaird has a blue plaque in Bromley.
«1

Comments

  • Started it this morning, enjoying it so far. Even in the infancy of the game, a town was nothing without its football club. 

    2 hour break to watch the 98 final and then back to it
  • Three times you've made that joke now.
    I was consolidating the threads.
  • Dramatisation of 1880s football and the clash between upper class amateurs and working class professionals.

    Series on Netflix now.

    For anyone watching Lord Kinnaird has a blue plaque in Bromley.
    As a matter of interest Henry where is that plaque? 

    The Kinnaird family once owned the school that I left 50 years ago.  I note that Kinnaird Avenue skirts one of the school's boundaries. 

    The building was originally known as Plaistow Lodge but became Quernmore school.  It had some rather grand times before (alas) becoming the rough house secondary modern that I attended.  I believe it is a junior school now.

    https://www.bblhs.org.uk/plaistow-lodge-and-lord-kinnaird
  • edited March 21
    Having checked it seems I was wrong and there is no blue plaque, which is a shame.

    I must have confused it with this one.

    https://www.bromley.gov.uk/directory_record/276614/prince_pyotr_peter_alekseyevich_kropotkin_1842-1921
  • Having checked it seems I was wrong and there is no blue plaque, which is a shame.

    I must have confused it with this one.

    https://www.bromley.gov.uk/directory_record/276614/prince_pyotr_peter_alekseyevich_kropotkin_1842-1921
    They are virtually indistinguishable in their chosen interests, so easy mistake to make!

    (I had to look Kinnaird up though).
  • Damn you Kropotkin!!
  • I think the story could have been told in two or three episodes. There was a lot of tripe to wade though.
    Also I thought some of the script, casting and acting was atrocious.
    It's very difficult to 'act' playing football, I cannot think of many films where it has looked natural.

    I'd be interested to know how much of it is artistic licence? My guess would be most of it.
  • Sponsored links:


  • Dramatisation of 1880s football and the clash between upper class amateurs and working class professionals.

    Series on Netflix now.

    For anyone watching Lord Kinnaird has a blue plaque in Bromley.
    Which team was he on?
  • What position did Julian Fellowes play ?
  • Kinnaird comes out if it we'll despite being a posho.

    I enjoyed it as a drama. Only six episodes and it was as much about class and family than football but it was a crucial time in soccer history when our game could have split in the way rugby did into amateur mainly southern teams and professional mainly northern teams.  The Football League comes five years later.  Football nearly split again in the early 20th century on the same amateur v professional lines.

    Some of the historical timeline was moved around to make a better story but it was largely factual in terms of the football as far as my limited knowledge can tell.

    The one glaring and deliberate gap was which team does Suter play for when he leaves Darwen.


  • Proper Catherine Cookson stuff that.


  • Brideshead Revisited for blokes
  • ads said:
    Brideshead Revisited for blokes
    Brideshead is very much a "blokes" book and TV series.

    One of, if not my favourite books and TV series ever.

    Have you read or seen either?
  • Kinnaird comes out if it we'll despite being a posho.

    I enjoyed it as a drama. Only six episodes and it was as much about class and family than football but it was a crucial time in soccer history when our game could have split in the way rugby did into amateur mainly southern teams and professional mainly northern teams.  The Football League comes five years later.  Football nearly split again in the early 20th century on the same amateur v professional lines.

    Some of the historical timeline was moved around to make a better story but it was largely factual in terms of the football as far as my limited knowledge can tell.

    The one glaring and deliberate gap was which team does Suter play for when he leaves Darwen.


    I read this one - He really played for Blackburn Rovers, but Olympic won the cup in 1883. 
  • Kinnaird comes out if it we'll despite being a posho.

    I enjoyed it as a drama. Only six episodes and it was as much about class and family than football but it was a crucial time in soccer history when our game could have split in the way rugby did into amateur mainly southern teams and professional mainly northern teams.  The Football League comes five years later.  Football nearly split again in the early 20th century on the same amateur v professional lines.

    Some of the historical timeline was moved around to make a better story but it was largely factual in terms of the football as far as my limited knowledge can tell.

    The one glaring and deliberate gap was which team does Suter play for when he leaves Darwen.


    I read this one - He really played for Blackburn Rovers, but Olympic won the cup in 1883. 






    But they just referred to Blackburn Football Club and had signs saying just that.

    Suter did lift the FA Cup but not in the game or for the team shown in the programme.
  • Kinnaird comes out if it we'll despite being a posho.

    I enjoyed it as a drama. Only six episodes and it was as much about class and family than football but it was a crucial time in soccer history when our game could have split in the way rugby did into amateur mainly southern teams and professional mainly northern teams.  The Football League comes five years later.  Football nearly split again in the early 20th century on the same amateur v professional lines.

    Some of the historical timeline was moved around to make a better story but it was largely factual in terms of the football as far as my limited knowledge can tell.

    The one glaring and deliberate gap was which team does Suter play for when he leaves Darwen.


    No wonder it’s on Netflix and not sky, as football wasn’t around before 92’,that’s 1992 & not 1892.
  • Sponsored links:


  • thought it was brilliant binged it on Saturday. 
  • any mention of Blackheath in this? 
  • edited March 23
    Rothko said:
    any mention of Blackheath in this? 
    None. It's set in 1879/80 so long after they left the FA in 1872
  • It's pretty terrible, but i shall finish it anyway 
  • It's pretty terrible, but i shall finish it anyway 
    Same as me. I liked a couple of the characters and parts of the story.
  • FSLN1 said:
    What position did Julian Fellowes play ?

    Being a Tory, he was on the right-wing.
    I was going to suggest that Kropotkin played on the left wing but found myself contemplating that the primary inspiration of anarcho-syndicalism is centred on the idea that power corrupts and that any hierarchy that cannot be ethically justified must either be dismantled or replaced by a decentralised egalitarian control.

    Clearly then he is the archetypal British centre forward, a Jeff Astle or Alan Shearer type if you like.
    I believe  that  this is backed up by Kropotkin's conclusions that not all human societies were based on competition as were those of industrialised Europe, and that many societies exhibited cooperation among individuals and groups as the norm.

    So a team player but he liked to take all the penalties and the free kicks that were in and around the penalty box.
  • FSLN1 said:
    What position did Julian Fellowes play ?

    Being a Tory, he was on the right-wing.
    I was going to suggest that Kropotkin played on the left wing but found myself contemplating that the primary inspiration of anarcho-syndicalism is centred on the idea that power corrupts and that any hierarchy that cannot be ethically justified must either be dismantled or replaced by a decentralised egalitarian control.

    Clearly then he is the archetypal British centre forward, a Jeff Astle or Alan Shearer type if you like.
    I believe  that  this is backed up by Kropotkin's conclusions that not all human societies were based on competition as were those of industrialised Europe, and that many societies exhibited cooperation among individuals and groups as the norm.

    So a team player but he liked to take all the penalties and the free kicks that were in and around the penalty box.
    well said..
  • FSLN1 said:
    What position did Julian Fellowes play ?

    Being a Tory, he was on the right-wing.
    I was going to suggest that Kropotkin played on the left wing but found myself contemplating that the primary inspiration of anarcho-syndicalism is centred on the idea that power corrupts and that any hierarchy that cannot be ethically justified must either be dismantled or replaced by a decentralised egalitarian control.

    Clearly then he is the archetypal British centre forward, a Jeff Astle or Alan Shearer type if you like.
    I believe  that  this is backed up by Kropotkin's conclusions that not all human societies were based on competition as were those of industrialised Europe, and that many societies exhibited cooperation among individuals and groups as the norm.

    So a team player but he liked to take all the penalties and the free kicks that were in and around the penalty box.
    well said..
    Cheers comrade.


Sign In or Register to comment.

Roland Out!