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Apostrophe's. Test you're ability.

2

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  • I thought both Jesus's & Jesus' is correct. There is some confusion at the tube station where some of the signs say St James' Park and some say St James's Park. & it is/was St James' in Newcastle

    I think you're right Princess Fiona and the point is that even expert grammarians (which I am certainly not) dispute some elements of language. It's almost an exact science - but not quite - which is what makes it so contentious I guess

  • 13/13. And my dad worked as a greengrocer for a while ;)
  • I got 13 out of 13 as a result of succesfully completing primary school.
  • edited August 2013
    11/13. Disappointed. (Ermm, Gone through them and can only find one I got wrong though - short of perhaps misclicking one?)

    Apparently I got the Jesus one wrong, but Hart's Rules says otherwise there. Jesus's or Jesus' are both correct.
  • LuckyReds said:

    11/13. Disappointed.

    Same. Must of been a couple of trick questions!
  • LuckyReds said:

    11/13. Disappointed.

    Same. Must of been a couple of trick questions!
    See my note about the Jesus one, give yourself an extra point just in case ;)
  • edited August 2013
    Curb_It said:

    wickford said:

    Jesus' !

    Yes bloody Jesus's?

    Yep, got 12/13 but got this one wrong - I still think I was right!

    EDIT: Just seen LuckyReds post, so I actually got 13/13.

    Agree with Morts, it's not really rocket science.
  • On a slightly different note...

    Why do people on here insist on missing out the word "to" when stating, for example, "Who's going Bournemouth?"

    Annoys the heck out of me!!!

    I wish it didn't, but that really does annoy me.

    As for the test, I got 12/13. Stupidly put Fawke's instead of Fawkes'.
  • 13. Places like Starbucks and Blacks annoy me.
  • LuckyReds said:

    11/13. Disappointed.

    Same. Must of been a couple of trick questions!
    Must HAVE been a couple of trick questions.
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  • I feel the need to correct the apostrophe quiz. Question 6 is not about apostrophes; it's about homophones.
  • 13 - ye's.
  • 13/13 but it's also about possessives.
  • 10/13. I passed English 'O' level as well. Must be getting old.
  • On a slightly different note...

    Why do people on here insist on missing out the word "to" when stating, for example, "Who's going Bournemouth?"

    Annoys the heck out of me!!!

    Triple exclamation marks are almost as bad. After the thread title 'Who's going Millwall?', we decided it was vernacular for "Who's going mental?"

  • edited August 2013
    12 out of13. The bogus Jesus one got me too. And I'm drunk.
  • edited August 2013

    I thought both Jesus's & Jesus' is correct. There is some confusion at the tube station where some of the signs say St James' Park and some say St James's Park. & it is/was St James' in Newcastle

    The place is called St James's Park, and I'd be surprised if LT got it wrong in their official signage. LT are consistent about Earl's Court and Barons Court (sic), for instance. As a professional pedant, what amused me recently was to walk across Sloane Square and see the borough street signs on 'King's Road', and the borough signposts referring to 'Kings Road'.

    What about extraneous initial caps in print journalism? I applaud the Guardian generally for its stance on getting rid of them: "Victoria station" is sensible, although "Gatwick airport" is debatable. Yet, when they refer to "Dulwich college", the computer has obviously beaten the brain.



  • LuckyReds said:

    11/13. Disappointed. (Ermm, Gone through them and can only find one I got wrong though - short of perhaps misclicking one?)

    Apparently I got the Jesus one wrong, but Hart's Rules says otherwise there. Jesus's or Jesus' are both correct.

    LuckyReds - It's wonderful to see Hart's Rules referred to on Charlton Life! And, for really intense pedantry when it comes to print, I also recommend Judith Butcher's 'Copy-Editing'; Cambridge University Press, 1975, and later editions.

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  • My degree is in English Language and Literature so I'm really pleased that I scored 13!
  • Bill Stumps has wiped out a perfectly good discussion about apostrophes. Bill Stumps must walk.
  • Bill Stumps has wiped out a perfectly good discussion about apostrophes. Bill Stumps must walk.

    It's Bill_Stumps not Bill Stumps
  • 100% for me. I was very quick too. I should have had a stopwatch running!
    (I live in a road whose name should have an apostrophe and doesn't - a bit like Addicks Place - perhaps street names don't have them for some reason?)
    I am a pedant - I even try to remember to spell out one to ten but use digits for 11 onwards! What really hacks me off is the very regular use of, for example, "the 80's and 90's" when, as the 19 is missing, it should be '80s and '90s. Sometimes I even put an apostrophe in 'phone which is very sad.
    I also have to grit my teeth when people saying "different to" rather than "different from". After all, they wouldn't say "similar from" would they? Interestingly, Americans are really good at getting that right.
    And then there's using the word "data" as if it's singular. The BBC's journalists are very bad indeed at these two.
    I really need to get out more!
  • edited August 2013
    I am a huge grammar and punctuation pedant.

    I got 8 out of 13.

    Goodbye cruel world, it's (or should that be its') been nice knowing you...
  • Someone corrected me on the use of "the hoi polloi" recently stating that "the" wasn't required as "the" in Ancient Greek is "hoi".

    Also why would Dulwich college and Gatwick airport not have capitals - they are Proper nouns aren't they ? No different to England's troops ( for example) unless the question is should it be Gatwick's airport.
  • Cafcfan I also get annoyed by the use of different to, when it should be different from.
  • cafcfan said:

    100% for me. I was very quick too. I should have had a stopwatch running!
    And then there's using the word "data" as if it's singular.

    Yep, that's a common one. The singular is also confusing sometimes....

    The Charlton team is the best team in the world rather than The Charlton team are the best team in the world.

    (Of course, we know that the statement itself is false)

  • Bill Stumps has wiped out a perfectly good discussion about apostrophes. Bill Stumps must walk.

    It's Bill_Stumps not Bill Stumps
    No, it's Bill Stumps. The underscore is just to differentiate me from all the other Bill Stumpses out there!
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