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Working Overseas

edited February 2012 in General Charlton
Sick of working in England and looking to move overseas.

No idea where yet but thinking the usual places - US, Canada, Australia, NZ.

Has anyone else done something similar to this or know of the best way to arrange this?
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    edited February 2012
    Sick of working in England and looking to move overseas.

    No idea where yet but thinking the usual places - US, Canada, Australia, NZ.

    Has anyone else done something similar to this or know of the best way to arrange this?
    You can work anywhere in the EU, all you need is a job and you can move tomorrow. Speaking the language of the place you are moving to might help, although I lived in Germany for a few years I didn't start learning German until after I moved there so it isn't always a hindrance if your linguistic skills are somewhat limited.
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    MIGHT help.......understatement of the year.

    In answer, James, to your question, any advice would depend on your reasons and expectations. It also depends on your age, marital status, children, health etc
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    And what kind of employment you are looking for/what experience and qualifications you have
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    All the countries you mentioned have strict visa restrictions.
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    All the countries you mentioned have strict visa restrictions.
    Except that all British citizens have the right to a one-year work permit in Australia, and if you find an employer that likes you it can easily be extended.
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    I am currently working on The Isle of Sheppey.

    Over-rated and all the locals appear to have six fingers.
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    I worked in australia 2 years ago, but that was backpacker style. If you go out on a basic working visa you have to do 90 days fruit picking, or construction in the north to qualify for a second year.
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    I worked in australia 2 years ago, but that was backpacker style. If you go out on a basic working visa you have to do 90 days fruit picking, or construction in the north to qualify for a second year.
    ha ha, love it. That sounds like a change. What qualifies as 'the north' though? The Northern Territory only, or are parts of WA and Queensland included?
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    And you have to be under 30 years and 11 months to qualify for the 'working holiday visa' in oz and nz, right?

    I assume that that is what the above posts are referring to
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    Yes, but it doesn't include New Zealand (unless that's changed too).
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    I worked in australia 2 years ago, but that was backpacker style. If you go out on a basic working visa you have to do 90 days fruit picking, or construction in the north to qualify for a second year.
    ha ha, love it. That sounds like a change. What qualifies as 'the north' though? The Northern Territory only, or are parts of WA and Queensland included?
    Yer I think northern territory, but I only picked fruit in a place called berri in the south as it was a lot cooler. I also did a lot of hole digging nr sydney and some other construction work, but the heat can get rediculous. Monet conversion at the time ment I never earned under £10 ph and the fruit can be silly money ifu are good.

    its correct u have to be under 30 for that visa

    id say it was the best year of my life and hopefully il be going back next december

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    James - me too absolutely, live in a 3 bed house near stansted airport, 3 kids so need a 4 bed house, but everything in the UK is just going up (petrol, utlities etc etc) and my wages are simply not catching up.
    I work for an investment bank in Canary Wharf, so travel horrible, and have applied to work in our office in Tampa, Florida. Basically I should be getting my wages exchanged in dollars (rate 1.60 dollars for £1), and our friends on facebook out there already state that the cost of living is far cheaper - petrol about 40p a litre, houses ( 4 bed from £83,000 in a nice community!!). A great lifestyle, usual temps in winter 18-24 C - beautiful! Lots for families...if you have one. Luckily my work will arrange and pay for the Visa. Can't wait to get out there!
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    edited February 2012
    I assume you are looking to work legally.

    Increasingly these days it is about your skill sets. Work in US is tied your Visa status, not only for yourself but any other family member. Speak to an US Immigration Lawyer (the British Embassy will have a list of attorneys). Be careful about which state because many states have "Employment at Will" law which effectively means the Employer can sack you on the spot without cause. A lot of US corporations can be absolutely brutal.

    Use your own Immigration Lawyers some US employers offer the use of their Immigration Lawyers but that introduces a conflict of interest (its illegal but try getting that through the US justice system). I found the US is a great place to be if you are in work and have health insurance. It is not if you end up losing the job and the health insurance.

    Canada did offer an online site for people to clarify their skills and see whether there was a skills shortage match - a friend of mine who was living and working France as a plumber/ heating engineer recently moved he loves it there.

    As far as Australia and NZ is concerned I am led to believe expats are beginning to struggle to find work but again it depends on your skill sets. Also be aware whatever industry or academic qualifications you may have may not be recognized in the new country - i.e. you may have to requalify.

    As for the rest of Europe you will have to speak the language but certainly in France that is no guarantee of work. The French have natural reluctance to employ Brits but then perversely when they do often comment they work much harder than their french counterparts.

    Hope that helps
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    SCM - That sounds a great opportunity. As you work for a US bank then I may be "telling my grandmother to suck eggs" just be careful of the contract of employment terms, your pension rights and any repatriation rights/costs (if needed). Sorry to say you will always need an exit plan. What happens to your current pension fund etc.,

    Even though your company will be arranging the Visa, What Visa will it be? How long before you get the Green Card? Do you intend to pursue dual nationality? Be aware their lawyers will only nominally be working for you they will also be working for the company.

    I say all this because I know at least 2 families move with their companies to an American subsidiary/parent on a new contract where within 6 months the jobs/projects they came to do were dropped. In each the guys were escorted off the premises, no one would talk to them and they were left scrambling to sort themselves out with company legal department.

    Good luck
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    'natural' reluctance to employ Brits. No. The French have a natural reluctance for everything foreign.
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    'natural' reluctance to employ Brits. No. The French have a natural reluctance for everything foreign.

    funny you should say that, a lot of Australian farmers do not like the Enlish workers, because apparently we are lazy and always hung over :-). Germans and keoreans were staff of choice
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    I have been working in Australia these past 7 years; just about to return to the UK. I would highly recommend spending some time here, although my wife wouldn't! Take a look at the link below. This is a very useful site, not just for Australia. There are articles on visa requirements and so on, as well as forums where you can ask specific questions.

    It is relatively difficult to get a visa these days, but you can go through an on-line "questionnaire" on the Australian Government immigration website which will show you what is possible in your own circumstances. Good Luck!

    http://britishexpats.com/forum/
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    If anyone wanted to work here in Australia there are massive opportunities in the mining and resources sector, literally thousands of vacancies.

    The jobs are based in remote locations and are often FIFO based but are very well paid, especially if you are an Electrician/Engineer etc, there are even plenty of manual labour jobs going too.
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    not sure how easy it is getting into Canada, it's a points based system - don't think you need a definite job lined up but the pay off for that is that with the points threshold being so high, you'll only qualify if you have a trade or skill that is in demand....

    once you get here, jobs (in Alberta & the West in general) are relatively easy to come by especially if you want to work in the mining & resources sector

    it's an expensive country though, and you have to be prepared for brutal winters that make what you are going through in the UK at the moment look like a walk in the park
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    SCM - That sounds a great opportunity. As you work for a US bank then I may be "telling my grandmother to suck eggs" just be careful of the contract of employment terms, your pension rights and any repatriation rights/costs (if needed). Sorry to say you will always need an exit plan. What happens to your current pension fund etc.,

    Even though your company will be arranging the Visa, What Visa will it be? How long before you get the Green Card? Do you intend to pursue dual nationality? Be aware their lawyers will only nominally be working for you they will also be working for the company.

    I say all this because I know at least 2 families move with their companies to an American subsidiary/parent on a new contract where within 6 months the jobs/projects they came to do were dropped. In each the guys were escorted off the premises, no one would talk to them and they were left scrambling to sort themselves out with company legal department.

    Good luck
    don't forget the ridiculous attitude to vacations in the US (& Canadian) workplace, 10 days is the norm & you are made to feel guilty for taking that by some employers - I'm extremely lucky I get 30+ days per year but that's because of the length of time i've worked for this employer - i have no doubt that if i switched jobs I'd be back down to 10/15 again....
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    Obv bit different as i am 22 with no ties, work for thomas cook as a holiday rep, spent the last 9 months in mallorca an lanzarote as a holiday rep. Home for 9 weeks an then will spend summer there! Only thing I miss bout home is charlton
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    don't forget the ridiculous attitude to vacations in the US (& Canadian) workplace, 10 days is the norm & you are made to feel guilty for taking that by some employers - I'm extremely lucky I get 30+ days per year but that's because of the length of time i've worked for this employer - i have no doubt that if i switched jobs I'd be back down to 10/15 again....
    This is one of the big 'sacrafices' of moving to North America. In May I left a post with a Consultancy firm in the UK and moved to the Canadian arm of the same firm. In the UK I walked though the door with 20 days or annual leave and after 7 years there had been upgraded to rthe company maximum of 25 days. If I was starting completley afresh here at the firm in Canada I would be starting on 10 days, but because they have taken into account my years of service in England, I have 17.5 days of basic leave. I'll have to stay at the company for 15 years to get 25 days of annual leave. The flip side of that is I get paid overtime and can accumulate TOIL which I didn't get in England, plus you get a few extra bank holidays out here. All in all I've been able to take about the same amount of leave and my salary has close to doubled for much the same job so from a work perspective it's been a good move for me so far, although I'm still working longer hours than I think I should have to. Hopefully that will ease when a couple of new recruits arrive in the spring (another Brit and an Alaskan from within the company).

    Jury is still out on the effect it's had on my personal life, but my wife doesn't move here permanently until May so it doesn't really feel like a permanent move yet. Once she's here I can properly start to settle down. I think we'll like it here and have a good life, however long we end up staying but I liked it in England too and don't have the downer on the country that some do. Certainly not everything is better here than at home.

    As other's have siad James, what os it about the UK you want to get away from and what kind of work do you see yourself doing if/when you emmigrate?

    Also, what are you interests a hobbies and what do you think you'll miss about home (apart from friends a family)? That's an important thing to think about too as you're more likely to settle somewhere if there are a few familiar things from home to help you settle in. For example if surfing and cricket are your thing, Australia or New Zealand are going to be more your thing and culturally they have a more 'English feel' but they are a long long way from home. If you're into Skiing and fishing then Canada might be just the place for you, but if you hate the cold or your job would mean working outside most of the time you'll need to think carefully about the climate. If gun crime, homophobia and fundamentalist christianity is what interests you then the States is where you want.
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    Australia......Under 30? do a one year holiday visa. Qualification for year two is 90 days working in a rural location...doesnt have to be up north as Shine says. Plenty of work here, but dont expect the same wage as residents and expect to pay more tax.
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    not sure how easy it is getting into Canada, it's a points based system - don't think you need a definite job lined up but the pay off for that is that with the points threshold being so high, you'll only qualify if you have a trade or skill that is in demand....

    once you get here, jobs (in Alberta & the West in general) are relatively easy to come by especially if you want to work in the mining & resources sector

    it's an expensive country though, and you have to be prepared for brutal winters that make what you are going through in the UK at the moment look like a walk in the park


    Canada has the `Full, come back later' signs up at the moment.
    How about the Falklands, India, even Scotland?
    Some more detail please James.
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    edited February 2012
    Australia......Under 30? do a one year holiday visa. Qualification for year two is 90 days working in a rural location...doesnt have to be up north as Shine says. Plenty of work here, but dont expect the same wage as residents and expect to pay more tax.

    I said the construction is generaly north, picking is anywhere as I also said I picked in the south. sorry if im wrong, im just going by what I was told...
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    See the God Damn Drunk Drivers thread.
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    Australia......Under 30? do a one year holiday visa. Qualification for year two is 90 days working in a rural location...doesnt have to be up north as Shine says. Plenty of work here, but dont expect the same wage as residents and expect to pay more tax.

    I said the construction is generaly north, picking is anywhere as I also said I picked in the south. sorry if im wrong, im just going by what I was told...
    Sorry wasnt digging you out mate......the criteria is generally rural work and not necessarily work/trade specific
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    Ummmmm

    Hit and run from james?
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    not sure how easy it is getting into Canada, it's a points based system - don't think you need a definite job lined up but the pay off for that is that with the points threshold being so high, you'll only qualify if you have a trade or skill that is in demand....

    once you get here, jobs (in Alberta & the West in general) are relatively easy to come by especially if you want to work in the mining & resources sector

    it's an expensive country though, and you have to be prepared for brutal winters that make what you are going through in the UK at the moment look like a walk in the park


    Canada has the `Full, come back later' signs up at the moment.
    s'funny because our population is growing rapidly (the fastest growth amongst all of the G8 nations), mainly due to immigration...

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/02/10/census-canada-2011-where-are-canadas-immigrants-coming-from/

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    not sure how easy it is getting into Canada, it's a points based system - don't think you need a definite job lined up but the pay off for that is that with the points threshold being so high, you'll only qualify if you have a trade or skill that is in demand....

    once you get here, jobs (in Alberta & the West in general) are relatively easy to come by especially if you want to work in the mining & resources sector

    it's an expensive country though, and you have to be prepared for brutal winters that make what you are going through in the UK at the moment look like a walk in the park


    Canada has the `Full, come back later' signs up at the moment.
    s'funny because our population is growing rapidly (the fastest growth amongst all of the G8 nations), mainly due to immigration...

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/02/10/census-canada-2011-where-are-canadas-immigrants-coming-from/


    that's probably why they've put the brakes on. I wish we would.
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