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NME RIP

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-43318898

For those of us of a certain age it was essential reading every Thursday for a few years.

Haven't looked at a copy for decades, as it should be.
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Comments

  • Loved this paper in the late 80s/early 90s. I remember it as fortnightly, but happy to be corrected. Hard for my kids to believe that I used to buy music before I'd heard it, based on a good review or interview.
  • Liked it but not as good as Melody Maker imo.
    The recent free version of NME was very poor.
  • Liked it but not as good as Melody Maker imo.
    The recent free version of NME was very poor.

    Melody Maker was a bit too goth for me. All the Cure fans read it at school. I remember them saying that the NME was badly printed and that the colour basically came off on your fingers and they were right.
  • Loved it in the 70s. Charles Shaar Murray and Penny Smith...particularly remember the fantastic b&w photo covers for 75 Zeppelin Earls Court, Paul Kossoff and Ian Curtis deaths.
  • I'm talking about 45 years ago!
  • When I left NME in 1990 I never thought I would outlive the print version.
  • edited March 7
    Young people don't buy/read print media.

    NME was always a bit dated recently anyway, still trying to revive rock and publish anything the Gallaghers were doing.
  • In my late teens used to look forward to it like my life depended on it! Sad times but I supposed the technology changes have done the inevitable. Never even buy a daily paper these days...
  • Used to be a required read but times change.
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  • Used to read NME. Sad.
  • At one time n the seventies I read NME, Sounds and Melody Maker, but NME was my favourite. In the sixties it was Melody Maker and Disc (I think?).
  • Essential reading in the days of Punk and sometime after for me...Nick Kent was my favourite, good that he came out the other side intact as he lived the life so to speak. Like someone said, it's demise was inevitable I'm afraid.
  • edited March 7
    JamesSeed said:

    At one time in the seventies I read NME, Sounds and Melody Maker, but NME was my favourite. In the sixties it was Melody Maker and Disc (I think?).

    And I think I got them near Tottenham Court Rd on a Wednesday afternoon, hot off the press.
  • Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..
  • Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..

    What did it champion in its later years?
  • JamesSeed said:

    JamesSeed said:

    At one time in the seventies I read NME, Sounds and Melody Maker, but NME was my favourite. In the sixties it was Melody Maker and Disc (I think?).

    And I think I got them near Tottenham Court Rd on a Wednesday afternoon, hot off the press.
    Me to.
  • Uboat said:

    Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..

    What did it champion in its later years?
    Whatever paid for the advertising space
  • Uboat said:

    Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..

    What did it champion in its later years?
    It was primarily UK rock/indie music.

    In its final years switched to a more mainstream pop/rap interviews and articles as a desperation move to get the young audience back.
  • I was always a Record Mirror man myself, used to love the R&B Top 20 chart every week in the 60s.

    First time I ever saw records like Ride Your Pony and Harlem Shuffle mentioned in the UK.
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  • Uboat said:

    Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..

    What did it champion in its later years?
    It was primarily UK rock/indie music.

    In its final years switched to a more mainstream pop/rap interviews and articles as a desperation move to get the young audience back.
    Maybe it was because there was better music coming from those scenes? UK guitar indie has been fairly moribund for a while now
  • RIP NME
  • Leuth said:

    Uboat said:

    Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..

    What did it champion in its later years?
    It was primarily UK rock/indie music.

    In its final years switched to a more mainstream pop/rap interviews and articles as a desperation move to get the young audience back.
    Maybe it was because there was better music coming from those scenes? UK guitar indie has been fairly moribund for a while now
    They would've changed about 8/9 years ago if it was really about the music.

    They were 5 years at least behind the times.
  • Leuth said:

    Uboat said:

    Going free was never going to work

    The sort of music the NME likes isn't in great shape either. ..

    What did it champion in its later years?
    It was primarily UK rock/indie music.

    In its final years switched to a more mainstream pop/rap interviews and articles as a desperation move to get the young audience back.
    Maybe it was because there was better music coming from those scenes? UK guitar indie has been fairly moribund for a while now
    They would've changed about 8/9 years ago if it was really about the music.

    They were 5 years at least behind the times.
    That is very true. Their boosting of trash indie in 2005-2013 was a running joke tbh. Although I'm sure we have a few Hard-Fi fans knocking around here. Here to give UK guitar music a bloody great kick up the arse!!! ;)
  • RIP:(

    Used to buy it regularly but haven’t for years, sad to see it’s no more.
  • I was always a Record Mirror man myself, used to love the R&B Top 20 chart every week in the 60s.

    First time I ever saw records like Ride Your Pony and Harlem Shuffle mentioned in the UK.

    In that case you should have been buying Home of the Blues which became Blues & Soul a year later:smile:

    Anyway shame about NME even though I was never a regular reader, another bit of our history disappearing.
  • I was always a Record Mirror man myself, used to love the R&B Top 20 chart every week in the 60s.

    First time I ever saw records like Ride Your Pony and Harlem Shuffle mentioned in the UK.

    In that case you should have been buying Home of the Blues which became Blues & Soul a year later:smile:

    Anyway shame about NME even though I was never a regular reader, another bit of our history disappearing.
    I knew John E. Abbey when he ran things from an office in Hanway Street round the back of Oxford Street. Still have most of them including the first ever copy of Home of the Blues.

    He later moved to the States and married Tamiko Jones.
  • The Kop remembers.
  • Another one of my memories... The Stranglers... The NME... Charlton....
  • I used to get NME most weeks through the 70s but I was mainly a ‘Sounds’ man.
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Roland Out!