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New job, salary negotiation.

My wife has been offered a new job. It was advertised with a salary range “dependent on experience “. Her experience is as much as anyone could expect for the job - 14 successful years in similar jobs. They offered the bottom of the range. Which is slightly less than her current salary.
What is the most effective way to negotiate at the least a match to her current salary and at best a higher salary?
Thanks.
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Comments

  • I had this issue myself recently. I ended up saying that I was looking around and thought my skillset was around the 'xx' mark. They then came back with a revised offer and matched my expectations. 

    End of the day, if she has the skillset and the experience required for the role then she holds some cards. Worst they can say is no. Chances are they won't say no imo.
  • From experience of being in this situation.  It all depends on your situation, can you afford to say no?  If so, just say I’m sorry but the offer is not adequate for me at this time, and play the waiting game, obviously it’s industry based, but generally speaking companies are short of resources, so she could be in a good position to play hard ball.  
  • I'd go back and say "My current Salary is x and my expectations were at least Y especially given my experience"
  • MrOneLung said:
    Just say no, I cannot join at that salary level, I am looking for at least £x amount per annum

    She already has the advantage in that they want her to join.
    Agree with this. Don't make it all about money when negotiating though - make it clear she is interested in actually working there.

    Something along the lines of: "I got a really good impression of the company and I'm excited about the role (blah blah blah), but I feel that my experience and skillset should place me towards the top of the salary range that was advertised. If you were able to increase the offer to £xx per annum then I would be happy to accept."
  • Assume they knew her currently salary? If so that's a little bit weird.

    Politely decline and say she isn't looking to reduce her salary! If they want her they'll increase the offer. I've never accepted the first offer in any job in 35 years!
  • So exactly how much experience do you need to have to get the higher salary?

    They sound like lowballers and need to be avoided.
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  • Is this direct or through an agency ? If it's the latter the agency may not being honest about the salary...either way if the recruiting company are aware of your salary aims there is little point in offering less ..

    You are getting off on the wrong foot but if it's a job the wife really wants make it clear what your salary aims are and if they don't meet it dont take it 

    In my experience procrastination by any party wont solve any5


  • iainment said:
    My wife has been offered a new job. It was advertised with a salary range “dependent on experience “. Her experience is as much as anyone could expect for the job - 14 successful years in similar jobs. They offered the bottom of the range. Which is slightly less than her current salary.
    What is the most effective way to negotiate at the least a match to her current salary and at best a higher salary?
    Thanks.
    Call Mr. Gallen as negotiator . Bettercstill ask if they can at least match her current salary ?
  • GNelson said:
    MrOneLung said:
    Just say no, I cannot join at that salary level, I am looking for at least £x amount per annum

    She already has the advantage in that they want her to join.
    Agree with this. Don't make it all about money when negotiating though - make it clear she is interested in actually working there.

    Something along the lines of: "I got a really good impression of the company and I'm excited about the role (blah blah blah), but I feel that my experience and skillset should place me towards the top of the salary range that was advertised. If you were able to increase the offer to £xx per annum then I would be happy to accept."
    Or you could just say........." do you really expect me to work for LESS than I'm currently on ???"
  • sam3110 said:
    Companies try it on all the time, they'll have a "range" and 90% of the time offer the lower end of that range. My wife had a similar offer a few months ago, similar field to what she's in now, but the office is in Paddington instead of Kings Cross, and it was a step up from what she's doing now, Salary range was 70-90k (she's on 68k ATM) and they offered 70. She asked for more and they said she hasn't done this role before (baring in mind they head-hunted her) so wouldn't offer anything more and she turned them down. 

    4 weeks later they called up again and offered 75k and she said on principal you can offer 90k and I'll still turn it down and hung up on them
    Great to hear !!
  • Thanks all. We’ll ponder and decide the best way forward. 
    It’s a charity job so they might not have the same mindset as commercial employers regarding salaries but in all of her previous jobs she has outperformed all her targets and regularly raised significantly more money than her salary in funding grants.
  • This what I wrote


    Thank you for offering  me the position  of  residential  support worker.  As you are aware, I am very passionate about taking on a full time role in this field.  At the time of application, I was aware that this career move would entail a reduction in earnings, but with the job advertisement suggesting a salary of upto 25,000, I was anticipating a reduction of about 5,000 per annum.

    I am aware that standard practice  is to offer a salary at the lower end of the scale, however, given my skillset and experience, you can be confident  I can hit the ground running and fulfil my role at the highest standards, with little need for training  and induction. I can bring much to the team and wider organisation. In this regard, I would  like to explore a salary  at the top end of the scale, as a reduction of £10,000 is likely to cause me financial  hardship.

    Thank you for your time. I would like to end by expressing my deepest  gratitude  for the offer to work in your team and I look forward to your response.  I am hopeful that we can find a solution to meet our shared goals.
  • Dazzler21 said:
    I'd go back and say "My current Salary is x and my expectations were at least Y especially given my experience"
    And add some additional to the current. Always ask for more
  • iainment said:
    My wife has been offered a new job. It was advertised with a salary range “dependent on experience “. Her experience is as much as anyone could expect for the job - 14 successful years in similar jobs. They offered the bottom of the range. Which is slightly less than her current salary.
    What is the most effective way to negotiate at the least a match to her current salary and at best a higher salary?
    Thanks.
    E-mail back, “Stop taking the piss, you [email protected]£king tyre kickers”
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  • Croydon said:
    Dazzler21 said:
    I'd go back and say "My current Salary is x and my expectations were at least Y especially given my experience"
    And add some additional to the current. Always ask for more
    Around £5k more than I am on. That way I can play innocent when I say I took the job on my same salary because the opportunity was too great to miss.
  • I'm with @Leroy Ambrose

    They are taking the piss before you've done a seconds work for them. I couldn't think of a worse introduction and would have no compunction about telling them to eat a dick 
  • So, before she got home and I could share the wisdom here she accepted their offer. £12 pa less than her current salary. Sigh.
  • iainment said:
    So, before she got home and I could share the wisdom here she accepted their offer. £12 pa less than her current salary. Sigh.
    £12 isn’t much of a difference. 
  • iainment said:
    So, before she got home and I could share the wisdom here she accepted their offer. £12 pa less than her current salary. Sigh.
    She accepted a job on 12k a year LESS?
  • iainment said:
    So, before she got home and I could share the wisdom here she accepted their offer. £12 pa less than her current salary. Sigh.
    She accepted a job on 12k a year LESS?
    No £12 only. £1 pm less.
  • iainment said:
    So, before she got home and I could share the wisdom here she accepted their offer. £12 pa less than her current salary. Sigh.
    She accepted a job on 12k a year LESS?
    I've got one at home like that. I've caught my wife haggling with street vendors to get the price of whatever tourist tat she wants up.

    She thinks it's charity work or something. 
  • sam3110 said:
    Companies try it on all the time, they'll have a "range" and 90% of the time offer the lower end of that range. My wife had a similar offer a few months ago, similar field to what she's in now, but the office is in Paddington instead of Kings Cross, and it was a step up from what she's doing now, Salary range was 70-90k (she's on 68k ATM) and they offered 70. She asked for more and they said she hasn't done this role before (baring in mind they head-hunted her) so wouldn't offer anything more and she turned them down. 

    4 weeks later they called up again and offered 75k and she said on principal you can offer 90k and I'll still turn it down and hung up on them
    "HR Professionals" are targeted against the overall wage bill, so offering the bottom of the range is fairly standard and a 'win' for them if they get away with it. It's also a challenge to see if the candidate has the confidence to come back on it. The actual 'employer' will be the line manager who usually cares much more about getting the right person than how much they will get paid. They will usually go in to bat against HR if they know a candidate has been offered the bottom figure and is fighting for more. It's in their interest that someone joining feels valued and won't be tempted to take the job and look for more money elsewhere in the meantime. Your wife's 14 years experience should put her nearer the top end of the salary range. They don't really want anyone with 25 years or more experience because there is a risk they come set in their ways or a tendency to be cynical. 
  • How times have changed, what happened to “you can feck right off, I’m not working for that” 🤷‍♂️
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