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Mystery building in Greenwich

Any lifers know the history behind the old white stoned building on the corner of Woolwich Road and Chevening Road?
 There is a coat of arms on the wrought iron gates that I don’t recognise, a white background, St George’s Red Cross a gold crown and four anchors, which suggest something to do with the river.

Comments

  • Someone I know lived in there, never got invited in, good judges of character. 
  • DA7 said:
    Any lifers know the history behind the old white stoned building on the corner of Woolwich Road and Chevening Road?
     There is a coat of arms on the wrought iron gates that I don’t recognise, a white background, St George’s Red Cross a gold crown and four anchors, which suggest something to do with the river.
    Greenwich Hospital .
    This is the badge on my work uniform.
  • The park east Greenwich pleasaunce, in chevening road is a burial ground for the old Greenwich hospital.
    I think when the old railway was built through central Greenwich (it’s no longer there), it went through the original burial ground and the bodies were transferred to the EGP site. 
    Got a big maritime connection with casualties from trafalgar buried there.
  • The building now dusts outside the perimeter of the Pleasuance but probably was the original hat entry off the Woolwich Road?
  • In the 1950s it was the local clinic. We lived nearly opposite the building in a flat over what is now a convenience store on the corner of Marlton Street.

    My twin sisters were babies and remember going there with my mum to get them weighed on scales like the ones the greengrocers use to weigh potatoes I thought. They handed out free orange juice, dried baby milk and Farleys rusks.   
  • In the 1950s it was the local clinic. We lived nearly opposite the building in a flat over what is now a convenience store on the corner of Marlton Street.

    My twin sisters were babies and remember going there with my mum to get them weighed on scales like the ones the greengrocers use to weigh potatoes I thought. They handed out free orange juice, dried baby milk and Farleys rusks.   
    Was in the 60’s too.
  • Yes, we had to queue to be vaccinated there in the 1962 smallpox scare.
  • Is it the old seaman’s pox clinic?
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  • Dave Rudd said:
    Yes, we had to queue to be vaccinated there in the 1962 smallpox scare.
    Is that the one where they gave us a lump of sugar ?
  • Dave Rudd said:
    Yes, we had to queue to be vaccinated there in the 1962 smallpox scare.
    Is that the one where they gave us a lump of sugar ?
    No, I think that was the polio jab.

    My memory of the smallpox vaccine was that it was administered using rapid jabs of a curved needle.

    Wikipedia seems to support this:

    Smallpox vaccine was inoculated by scratches into the superficial layers of the skin, with a wide variety of instruments used to achieve this. They ranged from simple needles to multi-pointed and multi-bladed spring-operated instruments specifically designed for the purpose.

    A major contribution to smallpox vaccination was made in the 1960s by Benjamin Rubin, an American microbiologist working for Wyeth Laboratories. Based on initial tests with textile needles with the eyes cut off transversely half-way he developed the bifurcated needle. This was a sharpened two-prong fork designed to hold one dose of reconstituted freeze-dried vaccine by capillarity. Easy to use with minimum training, cheap to produce ($5 per 1000), using four times less vaccine than other methods, and repeatedly re-usable after flame sterilization, it was used globally in the WHO Smallpox Eradication Campaign from 1968.  Rubin estimated that it was used to do 200 million vaccinations per year during the last years of the campaign. Those closely involved in the campaign were awarded the "Order of the Bifurcated Needle". This, a personal initiative by Donald Henderson, was a lapel badge, designed and made by his daughter, formed from the needle shaped to form an "O". This represented "Target Zero", the objective of the campaign

  • Dave Rudd said:
    Dave Rudd said:
    Yes, we had to queue to be vaccinated there in the 1962 smallpox scare.
    Is that the one where they gave us a lump of sugar ?
    No, I think that was the polio jab.

    My memory of the smallpox vaccine was that it was administered using rapid jabs of a curved needle.

    Wikipedia seems to support this:

    Smallpox vaccine was inoculated by scratches into the superficial layers of the skin, with a wide variety of instruments used to achieve this. They ranged from simple needles to multi-pointed and multi-bladed spring-operated instruments specifically designed for the purpose.

    A major contribution to smallpox vaccination was made in the 1960s by Benjamin Rubin, an American microbiologist working for Wyeth Laboratories. Based on initial tests with textile needles with the eyes cut off transversely half-way he developed the bifurcated needle. This was a sharpened two-prong fork designed to hold one dose of reconstituted freeze-dried vaccine by capillarity. Easy to use with minimum training, cheap to produce ($5 per 1000), using four times less vaccine than other methods, and repeatedly re-usable after flame sterilization, it was used globally in the WHO Smallpox Eradication Campaign from 1968.  Rubin estimated that it was used to do 200 million vaccinations per year during the last years of the campaign. Those closely involved in the campaign were awarded the "Order of the Bifurcated Needle". This, a personal initiative by Donald Henderson, was a lapel badge, designed and made by his daughter, formed from the needle shaped to form an "O". This represented "Target Zero", the objective of the campaign

    Kids today don’t know what they’ve missed out on. Reminds of watching a programme on tv about 20 years ago where they had been digging up graves from a church that had been sold off and they were having to employ only workers from the old Soviet bloc because they would still have been fairly recently vaccinated against smallpox etc (and the sort of things that would have put those bodies in their graves a hundred years previously) whereas those from the UK that had been vaccinated had received it 30-40 years previously and were starting to get a bit older by then 
  • Is Micenee House, tucked around the back of Westcomb Park / Vanbrugh Park, still going does anyone know? We used to have our jumble sales and Christmas fates in there when I was in the cubs
  • edited October 6
    Gribbo said:
    Is Micenee House, tucked around the back of Westcomb Park / Vanbrugh Park, still going does anyone know? We used to have our jumble sales and Christmas fates in there when I was in the cubs
    Still there and acts as RBG local community centre
  • Gribbo said:
    Is Micenee House, tucked around the back of Westcomb Park / Vanbrugh Park, still going does anyone know? We used to have our jumble sales and Christmas fates in there when I was in the cubs
    Still there and acts as RBG local history museum. 
    Definitely paying it a visit when I'm back. Got a lot of memory's from in there 
  • edited October 6
    Gribbo said:
    Gribbo said:
    Is Micenee House, tucked around the back of Westcomb Park / Vanbrugh Park, still going does anyone know? We used to have our jumble sales and Christmas fates in there when I was in the cubs
    Still there and acts as RBG local history museum. 
    Definitely paying it a visit when I'm back. Got a lot of memory's from in there 
    Since my post. I understand that the history museum is now situated in Woolwich in Artillery Square. I assume Woodlands House, Mycenae Road now acts a only a community centre and possibly art gallery.

    https://mycenaehouse.co.uk/
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