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When should you paint a rendered garden wall?

I'm looking for expert advice here please not guesswork from amateurs like myself thanks.
Google gives conflicting advice.
I had the wall rendered 8 days ago and it had dried out, although yesterday's rain has left it damp in a few places. 
The plasterer said let it dry out (possibly a week), then wet it (which I don't get if you want it dry) before painting.
Give it 2 coats and mix the 1st coat with 10%/20% water.
Thank you kindly.
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Comments

  • Watching with interest as I'm about to do this myself in a month or so. This is why we love Charlton Life!

    No idea what the answer is btw. 
  • edited June 5
    Watching with interest as I'm about to do this myself in a month or so. This is why we love Charlton Life!

    No idea what the answer is btw. 
    At least you've bumped it to the top :smile:
  • After two weeks it will be safe to paint.
    Two weeks is well within the safety margin.
  • I'm looking for expert advice here please not guesswork from amateurs like myself thanks.
    Google gives conflicting advice.
    I had the wall rendered 8 days ago and it had dried out, although yesterday's rain has left it damp in a few places. 
    The plasterer said let it dry out (possibly a week), then wet it (which I don't get if you want it dry) before painting.
    Give it 2 coats and mix the 1st coat with 10%/20% water.
    Thank you kindly.
    I dont know the answer either but will be getting my garden wall rendered soon hopefully, but would the plasterer not be able to give you the expert advice?
  • I'm looking for expert advice here please not guesswork from amateurs like myself thanks.
    Google gives conflicting advice.
    I had the wall rendered 8 days ago and it had dried out, although yesterday's rain has left it damp in a few places. 
    The plasterer said let it dry out (possibly a week), then wet it (which I don't get if you want it dry) before painting.
    Give it 2 coats and mix the 1st coat with 10%/20% water.
    Thank you kindly.
    I dont know the answer either but will be getting my garden wall rendered soon hopefully, but would the plasterer not be able to give you the expert advice?
    He did and it's in my post?
  • When you do paint it I'm sure you are intending to use a quality masonry paint.  Such as Dulux Weathershield  or  Sandtex. 
  • I think that thé drying process is to dry it through to the interior, and then the wetting is just for the surface in order to help the paint permeate into the interior.
     
  • I'm looking for expert advice here please not guesswork from amateurs like myself thanks.
    Google gives conflicting advice.
    I had the wall rendered 8 days ago and it had dried out, although yesterday's rain has left it damp in a few places. 
    The plasterer said let it dry out (possibly a week), then wet it (which I don't get if you want it dry) before painting.
    Give it 2 coats and mix the 1st coat with 10%/20% water.
    Thank you kindly.
    I dont know the answer either but will be getting my garden wall rendered soon hopefully, but would the plasterer not be able to give you the expert advice?
    He did and it's in my post?
    Sorry, my post wasnt meant to sound sarcastic. If he has given you the expert advice, what's the question? Again not meaning to sound sarcastic.
  • I'm looking for expert advice here please not guesswork from amateurs like myself thanks.
    Google gives conflicting advice.
    I had the wall rendered 8 days ago and it had dried out, although yesterday's rain has left it damp in a few places. 
    The plasterer said let it dry out (possibly a week), then wet it (which I don't get if you want it dry) before painting.
    Give it 2 coats and mix the 1st coat with 10%/20% water.
    Thank you kindly.
    I dont know the answer either but will be getting my garden wall rendered soon hopefully, but would the plasterer not be able to give you the expert advice?
    He did and it's in my post?
    Sorry, my post wasnt meant to sound sarcastic. If he has given you the expert advice, what's the question? Again not meaning to sound sarcastic.
    "Expert" tradesmen very frequently give t*ss advice, either because they're ill-informed or looking to make it easier for themselves, or both - so in my experience always essential to check pretty much everything out for yourself before somebody tears in and mucks it up!
  • You could phone the manufacturer of the paint you are going to use, they have technical departments that are usually very helpful about their products. 

    I had a new rendered wall which was outside but not open to rain as it is under cover, it had been left for some time though before painting. I painted undiluted with 2 coats leaving the advised first coat drying times. It has been good no problems.  

     
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  • I asked my builder;

    Leave it for up to two weeks considering the recent rain.

    First two coats to be wash coats, 30-40% water. Leave it for a couple of days (and no rain) then paint normally with exterior paint, 1-2 coats.
  • Rob7Lee has is right.
    You need to allow the wall to dry out and the ground behind it as the moisture will force the paint off quickly. 

    Damping the wall down first would be relevant if you were applying lime wash as that is how you control the suction to create a good bond.

    The problem with a modern masonry paint in this situation is that if its a retaining wall ( realise you don't say that) the retained garden is likely to build up moisture behind the non vapour permeable paint and is unlikely to last as long as you would like.

    You may wish to consider a vapour permeable silicate masonry paint, which will adhere to a cement render and be less likely to fail due to an excess of moisture. It's a lot of money though. 

    As has been advised, be sure to read the instructions and follow them before application whichever product you use. 

    You can usually read the technical sheets on line before committing. 


  • Thanks all (it's not a retaining wall).
    You ask 20 experts and you'll get 20 different answers, which always does my DIY head in.
  • Tomorrow 
  • edited June 5
    Our friends in South Bermondsey have a song for this …

    When should I paint M’Wall
    When should I paint M’Wall
    When should I paint M’Wall
    When should I paint …… M’Wall




    It’s seen a slow day 🙄

  • I have painted plenty of rendered walls and rather than waste expensive paint for the wash coats give it a couple of coats of PVA. PVA is cheap and can be watered down to a 50/50 mix and still be effective to seal render and plaster. 

    New render will suck the first two coats of paint up like a sponge so it needs be sealed ie PVA.
  • More importantly, what colour has she picked?
  • edited June 5
    I have painted plenty of rendered walls and rather than waste expensive paint for the wash coats give it a couple of coats of PVA. PVA is cheap and can be watered down to a 50/50 mix and still be effective to seal render and plaster. 

    New render will suck the first two coats of paint up like a sponge so it needs be sealed ie PVA.
    Then you google it and generally are told not to use PVA.
    http://www.painterspitstop.com/threads/pva-as-a-sealer.14004/
    https://diy.evo-stik.co.uk/product/waterproof-pva
    EVO-STIK Waterproof PVA is not suitable as a primer for paints.
  • edited June 6
    Here's an idea.

    Maybe go with what your expert has suggested.

    And if, in a few years, things are not looking so good ... paint it again.
  • Not professional advice at all but my mum had the whole house rendered and was painted almost immediately, a year on the paint is cracking everywhere the builder that done it says not enough lime was used in the render mix, on the contrast in the same road 4 houses have all been rendered and as of yet have not been painted and have been rendered for at least a few months. 
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  • All a bit of a mine field there's so much conflicting advice out there that it's difficult knowing what way to go. We have just had a wall rendered, and as it looks good have decided to just leave it.
     
  • A house up the road from me was rendered recently, it appear to have dye in the render when it was being put onto the wall.
  • edited June 7
    Once the render is dry it’s cured and is fit to paint. Wetting the render will allow the paint, assuming it’s water based to soak into the render rather than just instantly drying on the dry surface forming a skin and making it liable (almost certain) to peel. Dont be lulled into using a PVA primer. If you want to be ultimately professional then you could use a stabilising solution prior to painting but if it’s new render I wouldn’t bother. Use a good quality masonry paint. Get the paint from one of the specialist paint / decorating outlets like Dulux, Johnstone’s or Brewers. Buy Trade paint not the shizer you buy from DIY chains. 👍 Same for paints for inside your house. Trade formulations are far superior to the DIY paints. 

    If anyone tells you any different they’re wrong. 
  • Agree with the above. It’s all about the paint you use. Sandtex, for example, requires little or no preparation for new render. 
  • I wetted the render and gave it one coat of Sandtex today.
    Second coat tomorrow.
  • I wetted the render and gave it one coat of Sandtex today.
    Second coat tomorrow.
    Turning chilly down your way?
  • I wetted the render and gave it one coat of Sandtex today.
    Second coat tomorrow.
    Did you water it down.
  • we need photo's!
  • clb74 said:
    I wetted the render and gave it one coat of Sandtex today.
    Second coat tomorrow.
    Did you water it down?
    Yes 25% water.
  • clb74 said:
    I wetted the render and gave it one coat of Sandtex today.
    Second coat tomorrow.
    Did you water it down?
    Yes 25% water.
    In this heat should have been 32.6%  :D
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