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World Mental Health Day - 10 Tips for Good Mental Health

edited October 10 in Not Sports Related
As it's World Mental Health Day today here's 10 top tips on good Mental Health...

10 - Get plenty of sleep

Sleep is really important for both physical and mental health. During sleep our bodies regulate the chemicals in our brain. These chemicals are important in managing our moods and emotions. If we don't get enough sleep, we can start to get feelings of depression or anxiety.

9 - Eat Healthy Foods

Eating healthier foods isn't solely for your waistline, your brain needs a healthy balanced diet too. Deficiencies in iron and vitamin B12, can set you up for a low mood.  If you find you're particularly stressed or anxious, try limiting or cutting out caffeine as this can increase feelings of anxiety.


8 - Do things for others

Helping others isn't just good for the people you're helping; it's good for you too. Helping someone can help with your self-esteem and make you feel good about your place in the world. Feeling as though you're part of a community is a really important part of your mental health. You could try volunteering for a local charity, or just being neighbourly.


7 - Avoid alcohol, smoking and drugs

Alcohol, Smoking and drugs all cause withdrawal symptoms which impact on your mental health. 

When you've had a few drinks you can feel more depressed and anxious the next day, and it can be harder to concentrate. Excessive drinking for prolonged periods can leave you with a thiamine deficiency. Thiamine is important for our brain function and a deficiency can lead to severe memory problems, motor (coordination) problems, confusion and eye problems.  

If you smoke, between cigarettes your body and brain go into withdrawal which makes you irritable and anxious.

Other drugs will often leave you in withdrawal and can often cause very low moods and anxiety. More severe effects of drugs include paranoia and delusions.

6 - Get plenty of sunlight

GET SOME VIT D! 

Sunlight is a great source of vitamin D. Vitamin D is a really important vitamin for our bodies and our brains. It helps our brains to release chemicals which improve our mood, like endorphins and serotonin. 30 minutes to two hours a day of sunlight is ideal. During the winter, some people become depressed because they aren't getting enough sunlight - this is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Some people find using a special light-therapy lamp helps to alleviate the symptoms. Even use of a sunbed and proper skin protection has resulted in a reduction of SAD symptoms

5 - Manage stress

Stress is unavoidable at times, but knowing what triggers your stress and knowing how to cope is key in maintaining good mental health. 

Try to manage your responsibilities and worries by making a list. Often if you break down your worries and stresses and write them down, you realise that they can be manageable. Burying your head in the sand will only cause further anxiety which can lead to poor sleep and excessive irritability.

4 - Do something you enjoy

Try to make time for doing the fun things you enjoy. If you like going for a walk, painting or a specific TV show, try to set aside time to enjoy yourself. If we don't spend any time doing things we enjoy, we can become irritable and unhappy.

3 - Connect with others and be sociable

Make an effort to maintain good relationships and talk to people whenever you get the chance. Having friends is important not just for your self-esteem, but also for providing support when you're not feeling too great. Research has found that talking to others for just ten minutes can improve memory and test scores!

2 - Activity and exercise

Activity and exercise are essential in maintaining good mental health. Being active not only gives you a sense of achievement, but it boosts the chemicals in your brain that help put you in a good mood. Exercising can help eliminate low mood, anxiety, stress and feeling tired and lazy.

You don't need to run a marathon or play 90 minutes of football; a short walk or some another gentle activity might do the trick to release some endorphins to make you feel good.

1 - Ask for help

One of the most important ways to keep yourself mentally healthy is to recognise when you're not feeling good, and to know when to ask for help. 

There's no shame in asking someone for support if you're feeling low or stressed. Everyone goes through patches where they don't feel as good as they should. You can try speaking to your friends or family.

If you think your mental health is getting on top of you and you're unwilling to talk to someone close to you then it's highly important to speak to a GP as soon as possible.  

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Comments

  • What happened to number 8 or is that the one we can make up?
  • What happened to number 8 or is that the one we can make up?
    It's a way to occupy yourselves. You often can't find a way to feel down when you're busy trying to figure something out... 

    It's here:

    8 - Do things for others

    Helping others isn't just good for the people you're helping; it's good for you too. Helping someone can help with your self-esteem and make you feel good about your place in the world. Feeling as though you're part of a community is a really important part of your mental health. You could try volunteering for a local charity, or just being neighbourly.


    Was copying and pasting them from other articles and obviously didn't proof read. 

  • What happened to number 8 or is that the one we can make up?

    Masturbate regularly
    Compulsive masturbation can be defined as a mental health issue also. It usually causes socio-occupational dysfunction.

    Once a day to deal with morning wood is a routine that could help you feel fresh for the day.
  • Good thread with some good advice.

    First thing people could think about is when you encounter someone, or are about to, no matter who they may be to you, just for a moment think about your current or previous struggles, and recognise that we are all human and we may all be different, but we all have own our battles.

    Being humble to acknowledge this is important.

    Next, ask them how they are and be genuine. Even if the answer is, “yeah, not bad”. Sometimes it’s the smallest of things but it can make a big difference to someone.

    The way we behave and treat others has a reflection on ourselves as well as an impact on them. If we all do one extra thing each day for someone else, it will contribute to improving the problems that people deal with in silence. It will only be a small contribution, but if we think of the time we spend wasting on unnecessary or less important things, and compare to the time it takes to simply lend a helping hand to another, we will learn, educate and improve society one step at a time.

    The mental health, well-being, and quality of life of others is getting more attention than it did before which can only be a positive. But there is still so much work yet to be done.

    These 10 ways of improving mental health is a great step. But let’s also acknowledge that there is even more that can be done.
  • What happened to number 8 or is that the one we can make up?

    Masturbate regularly when on public transport in Rush Hour. 

  • edited October 10
    Happy World Mental Health Day to all those who suffer on here and the wider environment/world.

    Let's start to embrace difference and not be frightened or fearful just because we don't understand or get something.

    If someone is struggling however ridiculous it may seem to you, remember it's very real to the other person. 

    Let's not scoff, ridicule or deny difference, difference is truly what makes us all unique.

    Although borrowing from Animal Farm, we're all unique, though some may be more unique than others.🙀
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  • Thanks, Dazzler21, great advice.
     I would also recommend the use of a light therapy lamp to prevent seasonal affective disorder. I know that I suffer from SAD in the dark days after Christmas, so hoping by starting now with the lamp that I might suffer less and feel happier.
  • edited October 11
    I realise this is a football forum but it does permit other topics and therefore find it sad that this thread has so little support!

    One wonders if this thread was about Lyle Taylor going pink for October in support of Cancer there’d be a lot more activity and support.

    Surely Kyle Andrews and the Club should be acknowledged in making an effort to keep the discussion out in the wider domain!

    I often liken my own disability to a terminal illness, like cancer can be, the only difference being that should I die early it could very likely be by my own hand.
  • What happened to number 8 or is that the one we can make up?

    Masturbate regularly when on public transport in Rush Hour. 



    Interesting remake idea.....
  • Great post Ray. 

    My inbox is always open for an impartial chat too. I do have to say this forum is an awesome place. 

    Literal awesome too. I am in awe of many posters on Charlton Life, their bravery, their acts of kindness, their upbeat nature, their ability to always support charity and obviously their amazing choice of forum to be a part of.

    It's one of the few places I visit almost every day... It's that important.
  • I think people on here are very supportive and many are willing to listen. Mental health remains a difficult area to discuss and people are worried about saying the wrong thing.

    The world sadly can be a very lonely place when you're struggling and mental health challenges can be huge.


  • Thanks, Dazzler21, great advice.
     I would also recommend the use of a light therapy lamp to prevent seasonal affective disorder. I know that I suffer from SAD in the dark days after Christmas, so hoping by starting now with the lamp that I might suffer less and feel happier.
    I also find my light box helpful. I tend to start from when the clocks go back but as it's so dark today I may have an early boost :)
  • edited October 11
    There isn’t specifically anything wrong with me that isn’t present to a greater or lesser degree everyday @T.C.E. as it is for all those that have a disability be it Physical or Mental. Everyday is a challenge.

    it’s just the general disappointment in people and their lack of concern, empathy, sensitivity and yes, I know that’s a sweeping generalisation!

    We have a fellow addick, the club photographer who opens himself up to all on the club site and it gets little to no response.

    We have world Mental Health Day and people can’t be arsed to wish others well!

    And yet people can waffle for hours,days, weeks even months about stuff that in the great scheme of things are irrelevant!

    Even the R I P Thread gets more empathy, even when it’s people many of us haven’t even heard of and of course one day it could be you or me.

    i appreciate some things are difficult/uncomfortable to discuss and not everyone’s cup of tea but don’t just bury your head in the sand!
  • What about the massive thread on mental health that was on here recently with lots of input?  Arsene's post i believe.

    There's lots of posts on here about mental health.  Very sorry that we havent added much to this one but a lot has already been said.
  • There isn’t specifically anything wrong with me that isn’t present to a greater or lesser degree everyday @T.C.E. as it is for all those that have a disability be it Physical or Mental. Everyday is a challenge.

    it’s just the general disappointment in people and their lack of concern, empathy, sensitivity and yes, I know that’s a sweeping generalisation!

    We have a fellow addick, the club photographer who opens himself up to all on the club site and it gets little to no response.

    We have world Mental Health Day and people can’t be arsed to wish others well!

    And yet people can waffle for hours,days, weeks even months about stuff that in the great scheme of things are irrelevant!

    Even the R I P Thread gets more empathy, even when it’s people many of us haven’t even heard of and of course one day it could be you or me.

    i appreciate some things are difficult/uncomfortable to discuss and not everyone’s cup of tea but don’t just bury your head in the sand!
    People still struggle with the subject but there is an awful lot more awareness and support than there used to be
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  • edited October 11
    Curb_It said:
    What about the massive thread on mental health that was on here recently with lots of input?  Arsene's post i believe.

    There's lots of posts on here about mental health.  Very sorry that we havent added much to this one but a lot has already been said.
    And it needs to be continually said over and over again!

    How about just wishing everyone well, on World Mental Health Day?

    In the same way we wish someone a happy birthday, that would be a nice gesture?
  • There isn’t specifically anything wrong with me that isn’t present to a greater or lesser degree everyday @T.C.E. as it is for all those that have a disability be it Physical or Mental. Everyday is a challenge.

    it’s just the general disappointment in people and their lack of concern, empathy, sensitivity and yes, I know that’s a sweeping generalisation!

    We have a fellow addick, the club photographer who opens himself up to all on the club site and it gets little to no response.

    We have world Mental Health Day and people can’t be arsed to wish others well!

    And yet people can waffle for hours,days, weeks even months about stuff that in the great scheme of things are irrelevant!

    Even the R I P Thread gets more empathy, even when it’s people many of us haven’t even heard of and of course one day it could be you or me.

    i appreciate some things are difficult/uncomfortable to discuss and not everyone’s cup of tea but don’t just bury your head in the sand!
    People still struggle with the subject but there is an awful lot more awareness and support than there used to be
    Of course you’re right @hoof_it_up_to_benty
  • I think people on here are very supportive and many are willing to listen. Mental health remains a difficult area to discuss and people are worried about saying the wrong thing.

    The world sadly can be a very lonely place when you're struggling and mental health challenges can be huge.


    Saying nothing is often the worst possible thing to say.
  • Dazzler21 said:
    I think people on here are very supportive and many are willing to listen. Mental health remains a difficult area to discuss and people are worried about saying the wrong thing.

    The world sadly can be a very lonely place when you're struggling and mental health challenges can be huge.


    Saying nothing is often the worst possible thing to say.

    Unless you're Donald Trump
  • Dazzler21 said:
    I think people on here are very supportive and many are willing to listen. Mental health remains a difficult area to discuss and people are worried about saying the wrong thing.

    The world sadly can be a very lonely place when you're struggling and mental health challenges can be huge.


    Saying nothing is often the worst possible thing to say.

    Unless you're Donald Trump
    In that case everything you say is the wrong thing. 
  • It is sometimes hard to know what to say that can be meaningful and empathetic.

    For myself I will often say nothing for fear of speaking and saying the 'wrong' thing when in a sensitive situation. It depends on my own confidence and self-esteem at the time which varies from low to rock bottom.
  • I used to say nothing, I now believe it was my way of saying I’m suffering to so don’t go there. 
  • The fact that, at the time of posting this, the thread is not 'Members Only' may also have an inhibiting effect for some.

    Just my opinion for what it is worth.
  • edited October 11
    If you fear someone may be having suicidal thoughts or is even feeling quite low, I highly recommend spending 20 minutes doing the training here before speaking to them about it.  

    https://www.zerosuicidealliance.com/

    LenGlover said:
    The fact that, at the time of posting this, the thread is not 'Members Only' may also have an inhibiting effect for some.

    Just my opinion for what it is worth.
    Unfortunately I can't edit it as @Stig hasn't been fired and replaced by myself yet.
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