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Strip out the Prem Top 6....

And you could argue a case for the Championship being flooded now with more traditional 'big clubs' than the Prem.

Championship is such a great league imo.

Wished we were in it


Comments

  • Next year
    And we will be joined by West ham
  • "There are more big clubs among the 24 Championship teams than in a group of the smallest 14 Premier League teams".
  • League One is where it is... Huh!
  • Championship could have us, Millwall, Palace and West Ham next year...
  • cafctom said:

    Championship could have us, Millwall, Palace and West Ham next year...

    Add qpr, Fulham, Brentford
  • And you could argue a case for the Championship being flooded now with more traditional 'big clubs' than the Prem.

    Championship is such a great league imo.

    Wished we were in it


    I looked at table today and took out the top six and thought 'fuck me that fixture list bar West ham and Palace is shite.
  • Imagine that, playing against teams you’ve heard of and you actually know fans of the opposing team , as opposed to a poxy pub league against teams no one you know supports or has heard of
  • Funny was having the same conversation with my brother earlier. That PL look does show the shift in football cycles though. In my Charlton lifetime Burnley, Watford, Brighton, Huddersfield, Leicester, Bournemouth, Stoke, Swansea and Palace are all teams we have played at the same level or above many more years than not.

    The Championship is a great league. You only have to look at the weekly odds to see how one sided games are in the PL, yet the Champs games are always hard to call.

    It’s also great to see Bristol C and Cardiff in there proving still that money alone isn’t the only way to promotion.

    One day..
  • Sponsored links:


  • Q: Apart from the top 6, how many PL clubs have managed to score more than a goal a game this season?


















    A: 3 out of 14. Watford, Leicester and Stoke.

    (Top 6: 156 goals, everyone else 155.)
  • edited November 2017

    I'll be honest. I only opened this thread to check none of you twats called it the Premiership.
    All good so far. As you were.

    What’s that about the Premiership @stackitsteve? PS from a loving twat
  • I posted this on the Tony Pullis sacked thread, but I realise that it is better suited to being here:

    I was watching Watford and West Ham yesterday and there were a lot of foreign sounding players (names) that, I assume, are all earning more than £40k a week (£2m a year) that are probably nowhere near worth that. It just seems to be that if you sign for a Premier League club, from abroad, that hasn't just been promoted, you expect that kind of money. If West Ham go down they will have a wage bill that can't be financed (even with the parachute money) and players that they won't be able to give away, literally.

    However, as much as a disaster as it will be for West Ham (and as pleased an I shall be) they will just be replaced with a club that has a much lower wage bill who will be so excited at getting to 'The Promised Land' and as far as the big boys are concerned it'll just give them someone else to beat twice a season. Even if clubs disappear that won't bother those at the top as we would just promote one more from the conference.

    You just need to look at the celebrations at Brighton and at Wembley (when Huddersfield won the playoffs) to see that the Premier League will just keep chugging on and clubs the size of ours will go up, have our moment in the sun then come down in a financial quagmire.

    I haven't seen the figures but I'm guessing that the average debt across the two top divisions is rising, which is to be expected as income is rising, but I suspect that the average debt as a function of the overall turnover is much, much, higher in the Championship than anywhere else. After relegation, once the Premier League money stops the clubs can't service their debt but the only way to fix that is to spend even more and hope to get promoted again. All the while the clubs trying to avoid relegation are spending next season's money to just stay up - meaning that if they go down, and three have to, they face disaster.

    Truth is that the leagues will be ok, the clubs in them, maybe not, but all the while there is a smaller club that is willing to take the step up, there will always be someone to fill the place if someone drops out.

    Sadly, promotion to the Premier League almost inevitably leads to financial ruin. The question is when not it!
  • I posted this on the Tony Pullis sacked thread, but I realise that it is better suited to being here:

    I was watching Watford and West Ham yesterday and there were a lot of foreign sounding players (names) that, I assume, are all earning more than £40k a week (£2m a year) that are probably nowhere near worth that. It just seems to be that if you sign for a Premier League club, from abroad, that hasn't just been promoted, you expect that kind of money. If West Ham go down they will have a wage bill that can't be financed (even with the parachute money) and players that they won't be able to give away, literally.

    However, as much as a disaster as it will be for West Ham (and as pleased an I shall be) they will just be replaced with a club that has a much lower wage bill who will be so excited at getting to 'The Promised Land' and as far as the big boys are concerned it'll just give them someone else to beat twice a season. Even if clubs disappear that won't bother those at the top as we would just promote one more from the conference.

    You just need to look at the celebrations at Brighton and at Wembley (when Huddersfield won the playoffs) to see that the Premier League will just keep chugging on and clubs the size of ours will go up, have our moment in the sun then come down in a financial quagmire.

    I haven't seen the figures but I'm guessing that the average debt across the two top divisions is rising, which is to be expected as income is rising, but I suspect that the average debt as a function of the overall turnover is much, much, higher in the Championship than anywhere else. After relegation, once the Premier League money stops the clubs can't service their debt but the only way to fix that is to spend even more and hope to get promoted again. All the while the clubs trying to avoid relegation are spending next season's money to just stay up - meaning that if they go down, and three have to, they face disaster.

    Truth is that the leagues will be ok, the clubs in them, maybe not, but all the while there is a smaller club that is willing to take the step up, there will always be someone to fill the place if someone drops out.

    Sadly, promotion to the Premier League almost inevitably leads to financial ruin. The question is when not it!

    But the way to go is get up, then not overspend on those £40k a week Johnny Foreigners, even if it means relegation (like a club near our heart did in the late 90's, and Burnley have done recently...). If you do get back up having used the Sky money sensibly, then you can make a real go of it and push some of the badly managed clubs (like West Ham currently, and Blackburn, QPR, etc previously ) into deep doggy-do. So the key is that first season, and basically spending wisely and utilising the guys who got you there in the first place, even if it ultimately means relegation.
  • edited November 2017
    Pedro45 said:

    I posted this on the Tony Pullis sacked thread, but I realise that it is better suited to being here:

    I was watching Watford and West Ham yesterday and there were a lot of foreign sounding players (names) that, I assume, are all earning more than £40k a week (£2m a year) that are probably nowhere near worth that. It just seems to be that if you sign for a Premier League club, from abroad, that hasn't just been promoted, you expect that kind of money. If West Ham go down they will have a wage bill that can't be financed (even with the parachute money) and players that they won't be able to give away, literally.

    However, as much as a disaster as it will be for West Ham (and as pleased an I shall be) they will just be replaced with a club that has a much lower wage bill who will be so excited at getting to 'The Promised Land' and as far as the big boys are concerned it'll just give them someone else to beat twice a season. Even if clubs disappear that won't bother those at the top as we would just promote one more from the conference.

    You just need to look at the celebrations at Brighton and at Wembley (when Huddersfield won the playoffs) to see that the Premier League will just keep chugging on and clubs the size of ours will go up, have our moment in the sun then come down in a financial quagmire.

    I haven't seen the figures but I'm guessing that the average debt across the two top divisions is rising, which is to be expected as income is rising, but I suspect that the average debt as a function of the overall turnover is much, much, higher in the Championship than anywhere else. After relegation, once the Premier League money stops the clubs can't service their debt but the only way to fix that is to spend even more and hope to get promoted again. All the while the clubs trying to avoid relegation are spending next season's money to just stay up - meaning that if they go down, and three have to, they face disaster.

    Truth is that the leagues will be ok, the clubs in them, maybe not, but all the while there is a smaller club that is willing to take the step up, there will always be someone to fill the place if someone drops out.

    Sadly, promotion to the Premier League almost inevitably leads to financial ruin. The question is when not it!

    But the way to go is get up, then not overspend on those £40k a week Johnny Foreigners, even if it means relegation (like a club near our heart did in the late 90's, and Burnley have done recently...). If you do get back up having used the Sky money sensibly, then you can make a real go of it and push some of the badly managed clubs (like West Ham currently, and Blackburn, QPR, etc previously ) into deep doggy-do. So the key is that first season, and basically spending wisely and utilising the guys who got you there in the first place, even if it ultimately means relegation.
    I agree Pedro but in the end the club has to push on and that's when they start paying players more money and are 'forced' to do so without relegation clauses - rather like we did last time we were there.

    All clubs do it. Eventually they come up and decide that this time they are going to make a real fist of it to stay up. The pressure of finishing above three teams with a much higher wage bill must take it's toll in the end. It's like trying to keep rolling 6s, in the end you will get a 2.

    I do agree with your approach though - especially compared to where we are now but I'm not so sure that fans, en mass, will accept six relegations in twelve seasons, even if the club is in the Premier League every other season.
  • Funny was having the same conversation with my brother earlier. That PL look does show the shift in football cycles though. In my Charlton lifetime Burnley, Watford, Brighton, Huddersfield, Leicester, Bournemouth, Stoke, Swansea and Palace are all teams we have played at the same level or above many more years than not.

    The Championship is a great league. You only have to look at the weekly odds to see how one sided games are in the PL, yet the Champs games are always hard to call.

    It’s also great to see Bristol C and Cardiff in there proving still that money alone isn’t the only way to promotion.

    One day..

    Its never great to see Bristol City...... Scummiest fans on the planet outside of Millwall
  • Pedro45 said:

    I posted this on the Tony Pullis sacked thread, but I realise that it is better suited to being here:

    I was watching Watford and West Ham yesterday and there were a lot of foreign sounding players (names) that, I assume, are all earning more than £40k a week (£2m a year) that are probably nowhere near worth that. It just seems to be that if you sign for a Premier League club, from abroad, that hasn't just been promoted, you expect that kind of money. If West Ham go down they will have a wage bill that can't be financed (even with the parachute money) and players that they won't be able to give away, literally.

    However, as much as a disaster as it will be for West Ham (and as pleased an I shall be) they will just be replaced with a club that has a much lower wage bill who will be so excited at getting to 'The Promised Land' and as far as the big boys are concerned it'll just give them someone else to beat twice a season. Even if clubs disappear that won't bother those at the top as we would just promote one more from the conference.

    You just need to look at the celebrations at Brighton and at Wembley (when Huddersfield won the playoffs) to see that the Premier League will just keep chugging on and clubs the size of ours will go up, have our moment in the sun then come down in a financial quagmire.

    I haven't seen the figures but I'm guessing that the average debt across the two top divisions is rising, which is to be expected as income is rising, but I suspect that the average debt as a function of the overall turnover is much, much, higher in the Championship than anywhere else. After relegation, once the Premier League money stops the clubs can't service their debt but the only way to fix that is to spend even more and hope to get promoted again. All the while the clubs trying to avoid relegation are spending next season's money to just stay up - meaning that if they go down, and three have to, they face disaster.

    Truth is that the leagues will be ok, the clubs in them, maybe not, but all the while there is a smaller club that is willing to take the step up, there will always be someone to fill the place if someone drops out.

    Sadly, promotion to the Premier League almost inevitably leads to financial ruin. The question is when not it!

    But the way to go is get up, then not overspend on those £40k a week Johnny Foreigners, even if it means relegation (like a club near our heart did in the late 90's, and Burnley have done recently...). If you do get back up having used the Sky money sensibly, then you can make a real go of it and push some of the badly managed clubs (like West Ham currently, and Blackburn, QPR, etc previously ) into deep doggy-do. So the key is that first season, and basically spending wisely and utilising the guys who got you there in the first place, even if it ultimately means relegation.
    I agree Pedro but in the end the club has to push on and that's when they start paying players more money and are 'forced' to do so without relegation clauses - rather like we did last time we were there.

    All clubs do it. Eventually they come up and decide that this time they are going to make a real fist of it to stay up. The pressure of finishing above three teams with a much higher wage bill must take it's toll in the end. It's like trying to keep rolling 6s, in the end you will get a 2.

    I do agree with your approach though - especially compared to where we are now but I'm not so sure that fans, en mass, will accept six relegations in twelve seasons, even if the club is in the Premier League every other season.
    But that's better than being in division three and going nowhere!
  • Pedro45 said:

    Pedro45 said:

    I posted this on the Tony Pullis sacked thread, but I realise that it is better suited to being here:

    I was watching Watford and West Ham yesterday and there were a lot of foreign sounding players (names) that, I assume, are all earning more than £40k a week (£2m a year) that are probably nowhere near worth that. It just seems to be that if you sign for a Premier League club, from abroad, that hasn't just been promoted, you expect that kind of money. If West Ham go down they will have a wage bill that can't be financed (even with the parachute money) and players that they won't be able to give away, literally.

    However, as much as a disaster as it will be for West Ham (and as pleased an I shall be) they will just be replaced with a club that has a much lower wage bill who will be so excited at getting to 'The Promised Land' and as far as the big boys are concerned it'll just give them someone else to beat twice a season. Even if clubs disappear that won't bother those at the top as we would just promote one more from the conference.

    You just need to look at the celebrations at Brighton and at Wembley (when Huddersfield won the playoffs) to see that the Premier League will just keep chugging on and clubs the size of ours will go up, have our moment in the sun then come down in a financial quagmire.

    I haven't seen the figures but I'm guessing that the average debt across the two top divisions is rising, which is to be expected as income is rising, but I suspect that the average debt as a function of the overall turnover is much, much, higher in the Championship than anywhere else. After relegation, once the Premier League money stops the clubs can't service their debt but the only way to fix that is to spend even more and hope to get promoted again. All the while the clubs trying to avoid relegation are spending next season's money to just stay up - meaning that if they go down, and three have to, they face disaster.

    Truth is that the leagues will be ok, the clubs in them, maybe not, but all the while there is a smaller club that is willing to take the step up, there will always be someone to fill the place if someone drops out.

    Sadly, promotion to the Premier League almost inevitably leads to financial ruin. The question is when not it!

    But the way to go is get up, then not overspend on those £40k a week Johnny Foreigners, even if it means relegation (like a club near our heart did in the late 90's, and Burnley have done recently...). If you do get back up having used the Sky money sensibly, then you can make a real go of it and push some of the badly managed clubs (like West Ham currently, and Blackburn, QPR, etc previously ) into deep doggy-do. So the key is that first season, and basically spending wisely and utilising the guys who got you there in the first place, even if it ultimately means relegation.
    I agree Pedro but in the end the club has to push on and that's when they start paying players more money and are 'forced' to do so without relegation clauses - rather like we did last time we were there.

    All clubs do it. Eventually they come up and decide that this time they are going to make a real fist of it to stay up. The pressure of finishing above three teams with a much higher wage bill must take it's toll in the end. It's like trying to keep rolling 6s, in the end you will get a 2.

    I do agree with your approach though - especially compared to where we are now but I'm not so sure that fans, en mass, will accept six relegations in twelve seasons, even if the club is in the Premier League every other season.
    But that's better than being in division three and going nowhere!
    Only while you're in division three going nowhere.

    It's human nature to strive for the next level and the third division will soon be a distant memory when we are entertaining the likes of Man Utd and Arsenal every other week. Then the thought of having to go to Preston or Barnsley in the Championship will seem just as bad as having to go to Scunthorpe or Rochdale in League One seems now.
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