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Damp surveyor

Anyone recommend a reasonable damp expert in SE london I can get round to have a look at some damp issues in my house? Ideally want somebody independent surveyor rather than the likes of Kenwoods who just want to sell their product.

Comments

  • edited November 2015
    Tell him to sit in front of the fire for half an hour, he'll soon dry out............oh sorry you're looking for one :wink:
  • Anyone recommend a reasonable damp expert in SE london I can get round to have a look at some damp issues in my house? Ideally want somebody independent surveyor rather than the likes of Kenwoods who just want to sell their product.

    Where is the damp?

  • Also recommend Swiftcure (see Henry's response above). Have also used J.H Garlick, based in Welling.
  • My dad works for Swiftcure in Belvedere (not sure if he's a member or not on here) so I will send a PM.
  • edited November 2015
    @Sparrows Lane Lion is a bit of a damp surveyor...
  • edited November 2015
    I'm a keen surveyor of damp patches....
  • Where's Dave Mehmet - He might be able to recommend.
  • Anyone recommend a reasonable damp expert in SE london I can get round to have a look at some damp issues in my house? Ideally want somebody independent surveyor rather than the likes of Kenwoods who just want to sell their product.

    Boris was a damp 'expert' when he fell in that river in Lewisham.
    Can you ask him?
  • edited November 2015
    J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.
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  • You on commission H?
  • J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
  • J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
    I like your thinking @ForeverAddickted, he'll then be able to get his teeth into it :wink:
  • RedChaser said:

    J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
    I like your thinking @ForeverAddickted, he'll then be able to get his teeth into it :wink:
    Would you stake your life on it? ;)
  • RedChaser said:

    J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
    I like your thinking @ForeverAddickted, he'll then be able to get his teeth into it :wink:

    Fangtastic!
  • RedChaser said:

    J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
    I like your thinking @ForeverAddickted, he'll then be able to get his teeth into it :wink:
    Would you stake your life on it? ;)
    Don't make me cross sunshine :wink:
  • RedChaser said:

    RedChaser said:

    J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
    I like your thinking @ForeverAddickted, he'll then be able to get his teeth into it :wink:
    Would you stake your life on it? ;)
    Don't make me cross sunshine :wink:
    Who'd you think you are... Robert Pattinson?

    I'd knock you (un) dead!!
  • RedChaser said:

    RedChaser said:

    J.H. Garlick Welling been around forever, so can,t be that bad.

    Good to know I can call on him if ever I have a Vampire problem
    I like your thinking @ForeverAddickted, he'll then be able to get his teeth into it :wink:
    Would you stake your life on it? ;)
    Don't make me cross sunshine :wink:
    Who'd you think you are... Robert Pattinson?

    I'd knock you (un) dead!!
    If only, I'd buy Rolly out before daylight :smiley:
  • thanks all, damp is in living room by bay window and in corners, bit uneven
  • Like this?

    image
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  • Could be a really bad case of condensation, I had something similar once although not quite as bad, think it's worth getting checked out
  • looks identical mate, plus a few bits of just damp (rather than black) elsewhere. Had Kenwoods do a damp survey this time last year and they said it was severe condensation. Will try and get somebody else to check it out but how did you deal with it? Mines an old victorian 2 up 2 down.

    Cheers
  • Not mine - just an example.

    It's condensation - typical in a Victorian bay window, as they are generally single skin brickwork. The wall surface is cold and will attract the moisture in the house, just like condensation on the windows.

    You need firstly to clean it down with bleach or a proprietary mould remover. If you are going to wallpaper, it's probably best to cross line this part of the wall with a thermal lining paper - such as kotina. This should decrease the U value of this wall and help prevent the mould from re-appearing too regularly.

    What you really need to do is increase the heating levels and ventilation levels in this room - particularly the ventilation. You need to replace the warm moist air with colder drier air so the condensation doesn't form in the first place.

    Or you could stop bathing, washing, breathing, cooking and eating :smiley:
  • Might be that the damp proofing is knackered. In Victorian houses the damp proofing was often done using a thin layer of charchol between rows of bricks. Eventualy this cracks and dampness can rise. That was the problem we had several years ago (our house was built in 1890).
  • Might be that the damp proofing is knackered. In Victorian houses the damp proofing was often done using a thin layer of charchol between rows of bricks. Eventualy this cracks and dampness can rise. That was the problem we had several years ago (our house was built in 1890).

    Not sure I've ever seen a 'damp proof course' in a Victorian bay window.

    If a DPC was ever put in to properties of this age, it was generally a layer of slate or similar.

  • Addickted said:

    Might be that the damp proofing is knackered. In Victorian houses the damp proofing was often done using a thin layer of charchol between rows of bricks. Eventualy this cracks and dampness can rise. That was the problem we had several years ago (our house was built in 1890).

    Not sure I've ever seen a 'damp proof course' in a Victorian bay window.

    If a DPC was ever put in to properties of this age, it was generally a layer of slate or similar.

    That's right come to think of it we did have slate, it was covered in soot/charcol, our problem wasn't in a bay window it was in a reception room at the back of the house. We ended up injecting some anti-damp stuff (at approx 1 foot intervals) just below the old damp proof course...which has done the trick.
  • Cheers addickted.

    "What you really need to do is increase the heating levels and ventilation levels in this room - particularly the ventilation. You need to replace the warm moist air with colder drier air so the condensation doesn't form in the first place."

    That's a challenge isn't it. I've actually been renting it out as well so the problem is really the tenants and it's difficult to control them. You reckon a dehumidifier and / or trickle vent will help or is it too severe for that on the basis that it's similar to the picture you posted above?
  • edited November 2015
    I had this problem, (not as bad as the photo).

    I realised it was down to condensation, not damp from outside.

    The 2 biggest causes in the winter, were steam from cooking & drying clothing on radiators.

    So open more windows when cooking & drying clothes & check the walls for moisture.

    Microwaving veg rather than boiling/simmering, helps a lot.

    If the walls are wet dry them off, as soon as possible & it prevents any mould growing.

    I've not used a dehumidifier, as I found it unnecessary, when I realised, what was causing it.
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