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Google Stadia

For any gaming nerds like myself out there, Google are launching something called Stadia, a streaming system for games, where consoles are made redundant and games can be played instantaneously on multiple platforms with no need to download anything.
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  • I thought it was going to be a reference to what comes up when you search for “Gobshites” on google maps.
    (If you haven’t already, try it...)
     :D 
  • edited March 19
    I'm watching the keynote speech live.

    Looks absolutely mad. Not just the streaming but the tools they've got for developers, the issues the platform solves for multiplayer, the options it opens up, the fact you can create shareable gaming moments that others can play...

    If it doesn't lag, looks like a gamechanger
  • Can I sell my kids X Boxes now then ? 
  • I thought it was going to be a reference to what comes up when you search for “Gobshites” on google maps.
    (If you haven’t already, try it...)
     :D 
    Haha thats funny, Man Utd or Everton fan clearly done that
  • Some extra features:

    Crowd play, where you can jump into people's games at a moment's notice, from watching their livestream.

    State share, where you can capture a moment within the game and share it with people as a playable access point, so you can try and beat a high score/replicate an amazing goal etc.

    Google assistant built-in so you can ask Google for help in-game, from hints to complete video walkthroughs. 

    The level of computing required for this is insane, but it appears Google have decided we are at a point where it is possible. (For anyone who doesn't know, the processing power requirements of streaming a game compared to a Series on Netflix or a song on Spotify is almost incomparable, it's a huge step)
  • Is it better than candycrush?
  • When is it going live 
  • edited March 19
    This has been a thing for years now. Google are just bringing it to the masses. Lots of problems to overcome first - not least of which is network latency at the client (your) end. Most telcos already want to charge you more for the Netflix you're consuming as it puts a strain on their resources and they get no extra money from it (they're basically pisses off at content providers using their infrastructure to rake in profits). If people start demanding super low latency connections to avoid being left behind in the gaming arms race, telcos will just charge them more for it.

    Early adopters will be burned until the issues are worked out - and pay over the odds for it too

    Incidentally, I put in the corporate IT forerunner to this a few years ago (vdi, using vmware view and big Teradici graphics accelerators in the hosts). It was a shit show because they skimped on the server hardware, so anything other than basic spreadsheets and office software ran like a dog. 
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  • This has been a thing for years now. Google are just bringing it to the masses. Lots of problems to overcome first - not least of which is network latency at the client (your) end. Most telcos already want to charge you more for the Netflix you're consuming as it puts a strain on their resources and they get no extra money from it (they're basically pisses off at content providers using their infrastructure to rake in profits). If people start demanding super low latency connections to avoid being left behind in the gaming arms race, telcos will just charge them more for it.

    Early adopters will be burned until the issues are worked out - and pay over the odds for it too

    Incidentally, I put in the corporate IT forerunner to this a few years ago (vdi, using vmware view and big Teradici graphics accelerators in the hosts). It was a shit show because they skimped on the server hardware, so anything other than basic spreadsheets and office software ran like a dog. 
    Have you watched the keynote at all? The reason why Google is now doing this is because they believe latency will be negligible if not eradicated entirely
  • sam3110 said:
    This has been a thing for years now. Google are just bringing it to the masses. Lots of problems to overcome first - not least of which is network latency at the client (your) end. Most telcos already want to charge you more for the Netflix you're consuming as it puts a strain on their resources and they get no extra money from it (they're basically pisses off at content providers using their infrastructure to rake in profits). If people start demanding super low latency connections to avoid being left behind in the gaming arms race, telcos will just charge them more for it.

    Early adopters will be burned until the issues are worked out - and pay over the odds for it too

    Incidentally, I put in the corporate IT forerunner to this a few years ago (vdi, using vmware view and big Teradici graphics accelerators in the hosts). It was a shit show because they skimped on the server hardware, so anything other than basic spreadsheets and office software ran like a dog. 
    Have you watched the keynote at all? The reason why Google is now doing this is because they believe latency will be negligible if not eradicated entirely
    They believe it will be - but it ain't yet! Hence the early adopter warning. Its basic network 101 - you can't eradicate latency until technology permits it, and technology at the momwnt doesn't permit it. You could get everybody on the same platform and artificially level everyone's experience I suppose, but gamers wouldn't like that
  • Will it work on my Commadore 64 ?
  • Just walked into an IT crowd discussion
  • Isn't one of the arguments that with 5G around the corner that latency will not be an a issue ? 
  • They believe it will be - but it ain't yet! Hence the early adopter warning. Its basic network 101 - you can't eradicate latency until technology permits it, and technology at the moment doesn't permit it. You could get everybody on the same platform and artificially level everyone's experience I suppose, but gamers wouldn't like that

    Would be true, if it weren't for the breakthrough that is middle out compression.
  • edited March 20
    Isn't one of the arguments that with 5G around the corner that latency will not be an a issue ? 
    The devil is, as always, in the detail. End to end latency is the figure that really counts - and simple physics means that will never be eradicated. Last I saw, tests of technology enabled by 5G show point to point over the air latency of 2ms, but E2E latency still in the 35ms range. Add in whatever overhead exists in the protocol Google are using to present the display over the wire/air (probably PCoIP or similar) and comte tion across the telco network a d you're still looking at probably 130ms at the moment, with a drop to perhaps 90ms when 5G hits. That doesn't compare favourably with round trip times for dedicated machines on uncontended  networks
  • Technology and all that but the real aim is to change the business model to continuously milk gamers wallets for subscriptions.  I can't abide multiplayer.  I play games to unwind, the last thing I want is to deal with people
  • This has been a thing for years now. Google are just bringing it to the masses. Lots of problems to overcome first - not least of which is network latency at the client (your) end. Most telcos already want to charge you more for the Netflix you're consuming as it puts a strain on their resources and they get no extra money from it (they're basically pisses off at content providers using their infrastructure to rake in profits). If people start demanding super low latency connections to avoid being left behind in the gaming arms race, telcos will just charge them more for it.

    Early adopters will be burned until the issues are worked out - and pay over the odds for it too

    Incidentally, I put in the corporate IT forerunner to this a few years ago (vdi, using vmware view and big Teradici graphics accelerators in the hosts). It was a shit show because they skimped on the server hardware, so anything other than basic spreadsheets and office software ran like a dog. 
    Has it really been 'a thing'? A few companies have tried it and failed because of the latency.

    Google say they've got that solved. 

    If they've come out and made that big of a point about it, and it turns out they haven't got it solved, that's going to be incredibly embarrassing for them. I'm sure they're very aware of that so I'm inclined to believe their engineeers know (and aren't revealing) something we don't. 
  • Chunes said:
    This has been a thing for years now. Google are just bringing it to the masses. Lots of problems to overcome first - not least of which is network latency at the client (your) end. Most telcos already want to charge you more for the Netflix you're consuming as it puts a strain on their resources and they get no extra money from it (they're basically pisses off at content providers using their infrastructure to rake in profits). If people start demanding super low latency connections to avoid being left behind in the gaming arms race, telcos will just charge them more for it.

    Early adopters will be burned until the issues are worked out - and pay over the odds for it too

    Incidentally, I put in the corporate IT forerunner to this a few years ago (vdi, using vmware view and big Teradici graphics accelerators in the hosts). It was a shit show because they skimped on the server hardware, so anything other than basic spreadsheets and office software ran like a dog. 
    Has it really been 'a thing'? A few companies have tried it and failed because of the latency.

    Google say they've got that solved. 

    If they've come out and made that big of a point about it, and it turns out they haven't got it solved, that's going to be incredibly embarrassing for them. I'm sure they're very aware of that so I'm inclined to believe their engineeers know (and aren't revealing) something we don't. 
    The controller will connect directly to their servers over the internet apparently...So immediately you have latency as Leroy mentions at your end, not just from upload but also the signal sending. Might only be 15ms but that is only the first step and it'll all start to add up.
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  • I don't think Sony, Microsoft or Nintendo will be worried just yet tbh, I think Google will struggle to pull away the Console exclusives from the big 3 too 
  • edited March 20
    .
  • Anyone seen the redesigned controller? Looks f’in ridiculous.
  • £120 subscription fee and you'll still have to pay for a lot of games...Can't see that pricing model working too well.

  • cafcpolo said:
    £120 subscription fee and you'll still have to pay for a lot of games...Can't see that pricing model working too well.

    ten pounds a month? I think they'll be fine
  • olster said:
    cafcpolo said:
    £120 subscription fee and you'll still have to pay for a lot of games...Can't see that pricing model working too well.

    ten pounds a month? I think they'll be fine
    Not when you then have to pay £60 for a game.
  • cafcpolo said:
    olster said:
    cafcpolo said:
    £120 subscription fee and you'll still have to pay for a lot of games...Can't see that pricing model working too well.

    ten pounds a month? I think they'll be fine
    Not when you then have to pay £60 for a game.
    How much is XboX live these days?
  • cafcpolo said:
    olster said:
    cafcpolo said:
    £120 subscription fee and you'll still have to pay for a lot of games...Can't see that pricing model working too well.

    ten pounds a month? I think they'll be fine
    Not when you then have to pay £60 for a game.
    How much is XboX live these days?
    If you're smart about it, you'll get it for £25-30 for 12 months.
  • Football manager on stadia interests me, think it could work well 
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