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Change in Occupation/Career

Evening All

As this place seems to be the font of all knowledge, from politics to world travel, I thought that I would test the waters with my own conundrum.

I know that there has been a similar thread to this, but my situation is slightly different, and I would really welcome feedback from anyone that has been in a similar position.

After over 20 years in the Advertising/Marketing industry, I have decided that I need a total change of direction - it is generally a young persons industry, and all of it frankly bores me a little now.

The good news for me is that the Missus has an unbelievable job, so we aren't under any financial pressure, so I literally have an open playing field to work with in terms of a career change.

The question is how do you decide what you want to do with the rest of your life? I am only 46, so have plenty of years left in me, and certainly don't want to be sitting around on my arse until I peg it.

How would any of you guys approach choosing a path forward? I have thought about teaching, but think that that may be a bit of a cop-out.

Would love to know how other would approach such a fork in the road, and would love to hear of anyone else that has had a total career change, especially if it entailed re-training at Uni or College in your later years.
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Comments

  • What would you love to do? What kind of work do you think you could wake up everyday and look forward to?

    For me, if money/fear wasn't an option I'd love to open a restaurant.
  • I took voluntary redundancy 7 months ago. I didn't hate my job and I was quite good at it. I wanted to do something creative and use my redundancy to support myself whilst I got things rolling. However I just didn't have the discipline to make it work. Now I am doing a job I hate, for far less money, because I really suffered mentally by being at home all day.

    From my experience I would suggest the following.

    1) you say your misses has a great job, if you don't need to work, don't do anything you don't love doing.

    2) Do something though, even if its low/unpaid work. Even if it's only while you look for something else.

    3) if I had the last 7 months again I would have looked for a part time job, maybe 3 mornings a week. Not for the financial side but the social and routine. I am not much younger than you and I don't know your circumstances but "doing nothing" indefinitely isn't a good idea.

    Hope that helps

  • Unless you were born into serious money then you've been trained to work by society for 40 odd years. As said above doing nothing is not the dream that it seems. Interaction with other humans is so important and getting on Pop Master once in a while doesn't count!
  • Riviera said:

    How can teaching be a kop out? It's a wonderful profession and to go into it in mid-life with all your world experience would benefit all the children you teach. I know a number of people who have retrained to teach in their 40's. I had some great teachers and still see some of them socially now, almost 40 years since I left school. There is a real shortage of teachers in London and great opportunities to have a fulfilling career even in your mid 40's. However it is kop-out if you're just thinking about 14 weeks holiday and a decent 2nd salary for your household. It's a vocation and you really need to want to do it.

    Absolutely. After many years working for other organisations, I went off on my own six years ago ... not teaching in a school but providing training for my industry. I have not regretted it once and wish I had done it even sooner.
  • The NHS needs nurses.......
  • I'm in a similar position..... New year new change and all that
    I've been working in Reprographics for 16yrs on a 4 night shift in London earning 30k
    I'm 44 and live nr Rochester, I could do with a change in career and happy to try most things, but need to earn around the same money but on a Mon - Fri 9-5ish

    Any help welcome
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  • If you don't mind me asking Tel, how did you get a visa without a job? I've been looking at options for 'after China' and Oz seems nice, but not many job options as my wife and I are both English teachers.
  • I've been battling with this for the past few years.

    I'm a quantity surveyor in construction and have grown very despondent to the point where I dread every day.

    I signed up to a 8 week course with a UK based organisation called Career Shifters last year but was around the same time the Mrs become pregnant which changed my view somewhat on future career options.
    Some of the content is a bit wishy-washy but in the whole it asks some thought provoking questions about what it is you want to do with your life and how you can go about making it a reality.
    With a littlen in the house now and the added financial pressures I feel even more trapped than before but it's not forever and I will find a new path soon, all in good time.
    I'd recommend them as a starting point, the course itself was called LaunchPad but they have some good blog articles and success stories on their site that are worth a read. Good luck.


  • TELTEL
    edited January 8

    If you don't mind me asking Tel, how did you get a visa without a job? I've been looking at options for 'after China' and Oz seems nice, but not many job options as my wife and I are both English teachers.

    Second marriage to an Australian Stu. Have a look on the Australian government visa site. I’m sure there is a shortage of English teachers here and they may well be looking for those who have China on the cv as the Chinese are responsible for the biggest number of immigrants coming here. Let me know if I can help in any way.
  • Evening All

    As this place seems to be the font of all knowledge, from politics to world travel, I thought that I would test the waters with my own conundrum.

    I know that there has been a similar thread to this, but my situation is slightly different, and I would really welcome feedback from anyone that has been in a similar position.

    After over 20 years in the Advertising/Marketing industry, I have decided that I need a total change of direction - it is generally a young persons industry, and all of it frankly bores me a little now.

    The good news for me is that the Missus has an unbelievable job, so we aren't under any financial pressure, so I literally have an open playing field to work with in terms of a career change.

    The question is how do you decide what you want to do with the rest of your life? I am only 46, so have plenty of years left in me, and certainly don't want to be sitting around on my arse until I peg it.

    How would any of you guys approach choosing a path forward? I have thought about teaching, but think that that may be a bit of a cop-out.

    Would love to know how other would approach such a fork in the road, and would love to hear of anyone else that has had a total career change, especially if it entailed re-training at Uni or College in your later years.

    Don't do it.
  • Riviera said:

    How can teaching be a kop out? It's a wonderful profession and to go into it in mid-life with all your world experience would benefit all the children you teach. I know a number of people who have retrained to teach in their 40's. I had some great teachers and still see some of them socially now, almost 40 years since I left school. There is a real shortage of teachers in London and great opportunities to have a fulfilling career even in your mid 40's. However it is kop-out if you're just thinking about 14 weeks holiday and a decent 2nd salary for your household. It's a vocation and you really need to want to do it.

    Teachers are put under ridiculous pressure now and it's 24/7 and no work/life balance and full of people trying to throw you under the bus. My wife is actively trying to escape teaching but may have priced herself out of private-sector jobs. Avoid.
  • Am going slightly off topic, but for those who may be retired or simply have spare time for voluntary work, may I recommend Reach Volunteering. They have a website advertising organisations/trusts/charities looking for individuals to help out in a variety of capacities - finance, creative services, architecture & property, IT, legal, marketing and communications etc etc. Very often looking for people to take on voluntary trustee rolls, help charities with funding, advertising etc. You can register and upload your cv and apply for positions and also the organisations looking for help can see your cv and approach you directly.
  • edited January 8
    Both my other half and my brother went into teaching. They both hated it. The stress you're under as a newly qualified teacher is ridiculous and the lack of discipline in many schools makes the job all but impossible. If you're determined to go into the profession don't do so with any romantic ideas, it's a very tough job.
  • Riviera said:

    How can teaching be a kop out? It's a wonderful profession and to go into it in mid-life with all your world experience would benefit all the children you teach. I know a number of people who have retrained to teach in their 40's. I had some great teachers and still see some of them socially now, almost 40 years since I left school. There is a real shortage of teachers in London and great opportunities to have a fulfilling career even in your mid 40's. However it is kop-out if you're just thinking about 14 weeks holiday and a decent 2nd salary for your household. It's a vocation and you really need to want to do it.

    Teachers are put under ridiculous pressure now and it's 24/7 and no work/life balance and full of people trying to throw you under the bus. My wife is actively trying to escape teaching but may have priced herself out of private-sector jobs. Avoid.
    Well that's your view based on your wife, my wife has been in teaching for almost 20 years, she worked in the City like me before she took a career break to have our two boys. She absolutely loves it. She's at an inner London comp and there are tough issues sometimes but she deals with them. She is now the SENCO (Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator) across three schools within her academy and finds the job immensely satisfying. I know a lot of teachers, we have many in our friendship group, from state primary to private secondary to full on Public Schools and they all enjoy their jobs and find them extremely rewarding. Of course it's hard work but then so is running a pub. As I said earlier though it is not something you should go into lightly, you have to want to be a teacher and not view it as just a job.
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  • Interesting thread and interesting to see the polar opposites of opinion.

    A good friend and former colleague of mine took voluntary redundancy about 18 months ago at the age of 38/39

    He had paid off his mortgage and had enough in the bank to survive for a while so decided to go travelling with his inheritance from his mother. He had a brilliant time and returned in around April 2018 I think and still isn't working. He doesn't know what he wants to do so isn't rushing into anything. In a way I really envy him as he currently has no real stress, no wife/girlfriend or kids and answers only to himself.
    Last time I spoke to him he told me he would like to work for a charity (which is bizarre as he is, frankly, a bit selfish and rude but that suited his last role).

    I don't really know where I am going with this but I must confess to often looking around and thinking a life with less stress is definitely the way to go...just don't know what or where or how i'd even start.

    Good luck to OP but make sure it isn't just January blues...take your time and decide for the right reasons
  • Only comment I would add is - it doesn't have to be just one, long lasting career move. It sounds like you have a degree of financial independence so you can afford to take chances, try different things. Having worked for 37 years in a large company, I set up my own business, then worked in the NHS, now retired I do voluntary work totally different from that I did in my career. If you like and are stimulated by change, by new things, it's great to see what different roles have to offer.
  • heavenSE7 said:

    I've been battling with this for the past few years.

    I'm a quantity surveyor in construction and have grown very despondent to the point where I dread every day.

    I signed up to a 8 week course with a UK based organisation called Career Shifters last year but was around the same time the Mrs become pregnant which changed my view somewhat on future career options.
    Some of the content is a bit wishy-washy but in the whole it asks some thought provoking questions about what it is you want to do with your life and how you can go about making it a reality.
    With a littlen in the house now and the added financial pressures I feel even more trapped than before but it's not forever and I will find a new path soon, all in good time.
    I'd recommend them as a starting point, the course itself was called LaunchPad but they have some good blog articles and success stories on their site that are worth a read. Good luck.


    Tell me about it @heavenSE7 - construction is not a great place to be at the moment. TBF it's Quantity Surveyors who cause a lot of my headaches but the whole industry seems to be getting filled with know-nothing graduates who just want to make a name for themselves as opposed to building relationships.

  • Riviera said:

    Riviera said:

    How can teaching be a kop out? It's a wonderful profession and to go into it in mid-life with all your world experience would benefit all the children you teach. I know a number of people who have retrained to teach in their 40's. I had some great teachers and still see some of them socially now, almost 40 years since I left school. There is a real shortage of teachers in London and great opportunities to have a fulfilling career even in your mid 40's. However it is kop-out if you're just thinking about 14 weeks holiday and a decent 2nd salary for your household. It's a vocation and you really need to want to do it.

    Teachers are put under ridiculous pressure now and it's 24/7 and no work/life balance and full of people trying to throw you under the bus. My wife is actively trying to escape teaching but may have priced herself out of private-sector jobs. Avoid.
    Well that's your view based on your wife, my wife has been in teaching for almost 20 years, she worked in the City like me before she took a career break to have our two boys. She absolutely loves it. She's at an inner London comp and there are tough issues sometimes but she deals with them. She is now the SENCO (Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator) across three schools within her academy and finds the job immensely satisfying. I know a lot of teachers, we have many in our friendship group, from state primary to private secondary to full on Public Schools and they all enjoy their jobs and find them extremely rewarding. Of course it's hard work but then so is running a pub. As I said earlier though it is not something you should go into lightly, you have to want to be a teacher and not view it as just a job.
    Not just my wife but a lot of my friends as well. They've either all left teaching in the last few years or the left the country to teach in private schools.
  • I'm 44 now, been commuting to the City since I left school at 17 and spent the last 25 years in insurance. Absolutely hate travelling into London each day, but have a good/flexible job, nice salary and comfortable life at home which lets my wife work PT 2 days a week and look after our kids.

    Would absolutely love to do something different that didn't involve getting a train every day and be more local (I have no idea what though) but it's the financial side that prevents me and I reckon I'm stuck here for another 20 odd years......unless that lottery win comes about !
  • Might be wrong but @Kenny Achampong lives in Oz I believe.

    Teaching over there may not be the bureaucratic and disciplinary nightmare it can be here sometimes if I am right.
  • LenGlover said:

    Might be wrong but @Kenny Achampong lives in Oz I believe.

    Teaching over there may not be the bureaucratic and disciplinary nightmare it can be here sometimes if I am right.

    Correct. I have a friend who has been teaching there for about thee years now and loves it.
  • Similar to the post re: career shifters (I may take a look myself), have you thought about career counselling to help you decide? They may be able to ask the questions to help you identify what you may be good at based on your personality and skills etcc
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