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  • I need to really find out more about this subject. Something in my gut tells me it’s going to go wrong though. I doubt any of those making money from this live anywhere near a fracking site and wouldn’t if you doubled their profit.
  • I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.
  • stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    Do you know what percentage we could hope or expect to get in the UK ?

  • I need to really find out more about this subject. Something in my gut tells me it’s going to go wrong though. I doubt any of those making money from this live anywhere near a fracking site and wouldn’t if you doubled their profit.

    You wouldn't want to live close to a fracking site. Not sure how this site is going to work?
  • stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    Do you know what percentage we could hope or expect to get in the UK ?

    This may help.

    https://gov.uk/government/publications/about-shale-gas-and-hydraulic-fracturing-fracking/developing-shale-oil-and-gas-in-the-uk
  • stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    Do you know what percentage we could hope or expect to get in the UK ?

    "The UK could benefit from this technological innovation too; a British Geological Survey estimate suggests there are around 40tn cubic metres of shale gas in northern England alone. If only 10% of the UK's shale reserves were tapped, the nation could be powered for the next half century."
  • https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/fracking-environment-ireland-theresa-may-a7771956.html

    It's one thing to drill into the ground to get to gas / oil, but to be injecting liquid at high pressure into subterranean rocks can't be good.
  • stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    The US has massive areas of wilderness which the UK doesn't

    You can argue about the merits and environmental cost, but the US economy certainly benefits massively from fracking, and politically it means that it doesn't have to import as much from nice countries like Saudi Arabia and Russia
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  • stonemuse said:

    stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    Do you know what percentage we could hope or expect to get in the UK ?

    This may help.

    https://gov.uk/government/publications/about-shale-gas-and-hydraulic-fracturing-fracking/developing-shale-oil-and-gas-in-the-uk
    So according to that there is an estimated 1300 trillion cubic feet of shale gas under the UK. We use 3 trillion cubic feet a year, so accounting modest rises, that's 300-400 years worth of gas if we can get it all. That's obviously very unlikely, so it comes down to what percentage and can we reasonably expect to extract safely and economically.
  • If they're not careful Blackpool could disappear. :smile:
  • If they're not careful Blackpool could disappear. :smile:

    Thought that was, what Oyston was trying to do.
  • se9addick said:

    stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    The US has massive areas of wilderness which the UK doesn't

    You can argue about the merits and environmental cost, but the US economy certainly benefits massively from fracking, and politically it means that it doesn't have to import as much from nice countries like Saudi Arabia and Russia
    As I understand it most fracking sites will be in areas of economic wilderness in the U.K. It’ll be nice for northern England to feel like they are finally contributing something to our economy.
    ...briefly until they sink into the North Sea?
  • Would be an improvement for some parts of the north!
  • bobmunro said:

    I'm all in favour of fracking within a 30 mile radius of where I live.

    As long as it's done under Croydon and Thornton Heath.

    I think you need to be far more precise on the location. I've heard there's a gazillion cubic miles of oil, gas and gold Latitude: 51.397983 Longitude: -0.085956752
    Obviously I know that.
    I just didn't want to show off.
  • I assume you’ve all seen Gasland?
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  • I'm no climate expert but doesn't Fracking pretty much ignore what the climate change report a couple of weeks ago was going on about and the Paris agreement.
  • edited October 26
    Don't worry about the tremors, folks, this just shows the Government is right in wanting to set the traffic lights to a higher level. If silly May hadn't lost them their majority, they'd be able to make it Richter magnitude 6.0 as of tomorrow.

    I'm no climate expert but doesn't Fracking pretty much ignore what the climate change report a couple of weeks ago was going on about and the Paris agreement.

    Yes, it's possibly a bit cleaner than coal, that's all.
  • I'm no climate expert but doesn't Fracking pretty much ignore what the climate change report a couple of weeks ago was going on about and the Paris agreement.

    Well we're still be using some fossil fuels for the next 30 years which is a long time. And Oil is used for all sorts of non fuel uses as well (chemicals, plastics etc)
  • 0.8 magnitude is literally nothing to worry about.

    Not sure of the longer term consequences of it though?
  • se9addick said:

    stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    The US has massive areas of wilderness which the UK doesn't

    You can argue about the merits and environmental cost, but the US economy certainly benefits massively from fracking, and politically it means that it doesn't have to import as much from nice countries like Saudi Arabia and Russia
    As I understand it most fracking sites will be in areas of economic wilderness in the U.K. It’ll be nice for northern England to feel like they are finally contributing something to our economy.

    Yeah, cos we’re just a bunch of fucking leeches ‘oop north’.

  • 0.8 magnitude is literally nothing to worry about.

    Not sure of the longer term consequences of it though?

    0.8 is nothing to worry about if it occurs naturally and isn't a lead in to something bigger.

    0.8 made by an industrial operation (if that's what's happened) that's only just started is, for the people in the area, quite a big concern.
  • edited October 26

    se9addick said:

    stonemuse said:

    I must admit I was all for fracking to begin with but, having read some of the concerns in the US about existing fracking initiatives, I am less sure.

    However, it's hard to ignore the fact that fracking in the US makes up 43% of the oil production and 67% of the natural gas production. That is a massive contribution.

    The US has massive areas of wilderness which the UK doesn't

    You can argue about the merits and environmental cost, but the US economy certainly benefits massively from fracking, and politically it means that it doesn't have to import as much from nice countries like Saudi Arabia and Russia
    As I understand it most fracking sites will be in areas of economic wilderness in the U.K. It’ll be nice for northern England to feel like they are finally contributing something to our economy.

    Yeah, cos we’re just a bunch of fucking leeches ‘oop north’.

    I do believe he was being ironic. At least, I hope he was.
  • I watched a documentary a while ago about fracking, it showed Americans being able to literally light the water coming out of their taps as a result of fracking. I can't remember the name but I'll try and search it out.

    This is something that should NOT be happening.
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