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BT Sport Films to premiere 'No Hunger in Paradise'

Saw this on twitter and thought others may be interested in watching - have read one of his books which was very good. Even if he supports Millwall.

http://sport.bt.com/football/bt-sport-films-to-premiere-no-hunger-in-paradise-S11364225761209

Comments


  • Thanks for posting- will watch
  • They've been trailing that, sounds interesting
  • Thanks for posting Glovepup , sounds interesting, and worth a watch.
  • I met Michael Calvin in September for a book he's doing. He's actually a Watford fan, but got involved at Millwall due to the book he wrote, 'Family' (which is excellent). I found him a really lovely fella and some of the stories he shared about the murkiness of the Pro game were enlightening, but of no surprise.
  • He was on with hawksbee & Jacobs yesterday.
    Sounds really good.
    BT sport 3 are screening it again on Friday night I believe.
  • It was a good watch however it didn't tell me anything I didn't already know.

    There is plenty of talent in the pool but as players are essentially held and scooped up as assets at clubs like Chelsea and Man city and given astronomical wages they aren't as driven. For his faults, Joey Barton summed it up.

    Most worryingly the England manager knows this, which means the FA knows this but due to what's at stake as far as the premier league goes youngsters aren't going to be given opportunities. Arsene Wenger also spoke really well and spoke very truthfully
  • Not watched it yet but H&J said Wenger came out of it well.

    They also spoke about how clubs keep some young kids on knowing they have no future in football but just use them as `Training fodder ‘
  • Not watched it yet but H&J said Wenger came out of it well.

    They also spoke about how clubs keep some young kids on knowing they have no future in football but just use them as `Training fodder ‘

    Yes, this was the one point my missus sparked up and said how she could understand keeping the good ones but why string the others out. Explaining that sounds impossibly harsh. With the destruction of reserve football though it's the way. That youngster who might make it needs a side to play in and that makes his teammates sacrificial lambs
  • I bumped into one of old school teachers towards the end of last year, he explained he has two lads at clubs. One was at Arsenal but is not at a Championship club, the other remains at Arsenal and earns more a month than his parents combined do.

    He said he has tried to keep his lads feet on the ground, got him to put his money in property just in case the worse happens.

    I've not watched this yet but will do this week.
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  • Carter said:

    Not watched it yet but H&J said Wenger came out of it well.

    They also spoke about how clubs keep some young kids on knowing they have no future in football but just use them as `Training fodder ‘

    Yes, this was the one point my missus sparked up and said how she could understand keeping the good ones but why string the others out. Explaining that sounds impossibly harsh. With the destruction of reserve football though it's the way. That youngster who might make it needs a side to play in and that makes his teammates sacrificial lambs
    It's the same, if not worse, in cricket. Three or four in each side are identified at an early age as being potential pros so get to do the lions share of the bowling and batting. Regularly all some players do is field - and they travel hundreds of miles to do just that. At least in football they might actually get to influence the game in some shape or form.
  • I have a friend who's son is on Charlton's books. He has been offered, in the past, several opportunities to move to other clubs but is happy where he is but he (his Dad) is more than aware that there is pressure to prove that he is worth another contract, and then another one. He is clearly very, very talented (compared to you and I) but there is no guarantee what the future holds and even though a career in lower league football is well enough paid, without a contract (and it might only take one) at a big (Championship and above) club he will, almost certainly, retire from the game and need another career to pay the bills.

    From what he says the pressure is immense from early teens onward.

    I don't think he is being kept around to give other players someone to play with, but there's no doubt that goes on and the potential, however small the chances are, that one can make it means that none of these young boys will give up hope. The sad thing is that many of them pull away from traditional education so they fall out of the game in their early twenties with no real qualifications to fall back on.

    For every Wayne Rooney (who I suspect we would all agree is not exceptionally well educated) there are hundreds of young men educated and trained to do nothing needing to find a career.
  • Carter said:

    Not watched it yet but H&J said Wenger came out of it well.

    They also spoke about how clubs keep some young kids on knowing they have no future in football but just use them as `Training fodder ‘

    Yes, this was the one point my missus sparked up and said how she could understand keeping the good ones but why string the others out. Explaining that sounds impossibly harsh. With the destruction of reserve football though it's the way. That youngster who might make it needs a side to play in and that makes his teammates sacrificial lambs
    This is the same at every age group, 2 or 3 with potential from u7s upwards.

    That is until your 15 and that 2 or 3 have to be better than the player in their position in the age group ABOVE and BELOW.

    Up until u16 I'd say only 3 maybe 4 have a chance.
  • Watched a clip on Facebook with the author, Frank Lampard and Chris Sutton.

    Lampard was spot on with some of the parenting.

    My lad plays under 10's and some of the stuff I see from parents and some managers is disgusting (although to be fair mainly when we play teams on Canvey Island who are a different breed)

    Far far too much pressure on kids from parents who think their boy is going to be the next Messi or Jackson.
  • Watched it last night. Well worth a watch.
    Les Reed made a good point regarding the hypocrisy of the large clubs and their state of the art academy facilities and how the majority of kids who travel through their set up never get close to the first team.
    These clubs don't hesitate to just go out and buy who they want for however much it costs. He said a clubs barometer of success now appears to be on how much they can waste rather than how much they can nurture.

    Really opens your eyes as to what the likes of Wenger has tried to do for the good of kids coming through.

  • edited January 14
    Just finished watching it. I can’t help think that the lad that Derby ‘own’ the Football League contract of was encouraged by his Dad to chase the money.

    It looks like he was the family meal ticket and they moved from one club to another to get ‘better terms’. I wouldn’t be surprised to discover that his dad was given some ‘expenses’ to encourage him to keep moving. That massive Adidas logo on his sweat shirt may well have earned them a few quid also.

    I understand the frustration with him not being able to play for another league club without Derby being ‘rewarded’ for their investment in him but let’s be honest, he was given professional coaching for close to ten years, in total, and he just walked away.

    Imagine if Jermaine Defoe has just walked away from us and decided to sign for West Ham to earn more money. Oh, wait.....
  • One thing I couldn't believe was that some of these kids, the west ham boy sticks in my mind, wasn't following an academic path alongside his football one?
    I thought this was a given and all English clubs were required by law to offer an education to these kids ??
    I thought he said he only started studying for other things when he reached the states?

    I suppose training fodder is of no use if he's got his head in the books.

    F-in shameful if true!
  • One thing I couldn't believe was that some of these kids, the west ham boy sticks in my mind, wasn't following an academic path alongside his football one?
    I thought this was a given and all English clubs were required by law to offer an education to these kids ??
    I thought he said he only started studying for other things when he reached the states?

    I suppose training fodder is of no use if he's got his head in the books.

    F-in shameful if true!

    The clubs will look to do what suits them and a lot of pressure is placed on boys to do day release from an increasingly young age. A lot depends on the club in relation to how much they make up for the education time 'lost' to football.

    Man City for example will offer their signed academy players a place at a public school. Teachers from that school then attend the academy and provide extra tutoring. Not many clubs have the resources to do what Man City and other premiership clubs do.
    A 15 year old boy at a reasonably large club will generally be expected to spend about half of their school time at the football club. If they are excelling at their football and playing up or at International level they will inevitably lose more school time.

    Most parents go along with the club's wishes and do what the club wants. A small minority will rebel and insist on their son attending school, but this is often frowned upon by the club and often there are consequences.
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