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Sam Bartram in the fog in colour...

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  • Is it the legendary Stamford Bridge game?
  • edited January 3
    Ha ha. Just saw this on Reddit and saved it to my phone.
  • If he was alone on the pitch who took the photo? ;)
  • edited January 3
    A photographer with a wicked sense of humour? :lol:
  • Not sure that that is Bartram
  • Someone in the comments says it’s Arsenal keeper Jack Kelsey, as in this article:

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2012/dec/05/60-years-great-smog-london-in-pictures
  • It is Bartram
  • It is Bartram

    Doesn't look like him if you zoom in
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  • I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.
  • Great pic, even if it isn't Sam.
  • Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    No. Happened in the 40s. Was it Christmas Day, or Boxing Day.? Sorry can't remember the exact year. A copper wondered why he was still on the pitch, as the game had been abandoned for some time.
  • Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    No. Happened in the 40s. Was it Christmas Day, or Boxing Day.? Sorry can't remember the exact year. A copper wondered why he was still on the pitch, as the game had been abandoned for some time.
    Nope happened in the 37.


    On Christmas Day 1937, Bartram was in the papers once more after a bizarre incident in a match against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge. With the score at 1-1, the game had to be called off on 61 minutes due to thick fog. Unfortunately for Bartram, he was the last to be made aware. "Soon after the kick-off, [fog] began to thicken rapidly at the far end, travelling past Vic Woodley in the Chelsea goal and rolling steadily towards me," he wrote in his autobiography. "The referee stopped the game, and then, as visibility became clearer, restarted it. We were on top at this time, and I saw fewer and fewer figures as we attacked steadily.

    "I paced up and down my goal-line, happy in the knowledge that Chelsea were being pinned in their own half. 'The boys must be giving the Pensioners the hammer,' I thought smugly, as I stamped my feet for warmth. Quite obviously, however, we were not getting the ball into the net. For no players were coming back to line up, as they would have done following a goal. Time passed, and I made several advances towards the edge of the penalty area, peering through the murk, which was getting thicker every minute. Still I could see nothing. The Chelsea defence was clearly being run off its feet.

    "After a long time a figure loomed out of the curtain of fog in front of me. It was a policeman, and he gaped at me incredulously. 'What on earth are you doing here?' he gasped. 'The game was stopped a quarter of an hour ago. The field's completely empty'. And when I groped my way to the dressing-room, the rest of the Charlton team, already out of the bath and in their civvies, were convulsed with laughter."

  • So is there no picture of Bartram in the fog? I always thought this same pic (in black and white) was of that moment but now my dreams are shattered.
  • edited January 3

    So is there no picture of Bartram in the fog? I always thought this same pic (in black and white) was of that moment but now my dreams are shattered.

    According to several online pages that is the picture, but a few on here think it's of an arsenal keeper. (also the guy on Reddit said it was actually the arsenal chap)
  • So, we don't know for sure where or when the picture was taken and we don't know who is in it. Is that about right?
  • Chizz said:

    So, we don't know for sure where or when the picture was taken and we don't know who is in it. Is that about right?

    Not really.

    It is often been used to illustrate the Bartram story but it more than likely Jack Kelsey. That's how the owners of the pic caption it and if you look at the keeper closely it is not Bartram.
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  • Not Bartram. I think this has been misused before.
  • Dazzler21 said:

    Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    No. Happened in the 40s. Was it Christmas Day, or Boxing Day.? Sorry can't remember the exact year. A copper wondered why he was still on the pitch, as the game had been abandoned for some time.
    Nope happened in the 37.


    On Christmas Day 1937, Bartram was in the papers once more after a bizarre incident in a match against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge. With the score at 1-1, the game had to be called off on 61 minutes due to thick fog. Unfortunately for Bartram, he was the last to be made aware. "Soon after the kick-off, [fog] began to thicken rapidly at the far end, travelling past Vic Woodley in the Chelsea goal and rolling steadily towards me," he wrote in his autobiography. "The referee stopped the game, and then, as visibility became clearer, restarted it. We were on top at this time, and I saw fewer and fewer figures as we attacked steadily.

    "I paced up and down my goal-line, happy in the knowledge that Chelsea were being pinned in their own half. 'The boys must be giving the Pensioners the hammer,' I thought smugly, as I stamped my feet for warmth. Quite obviously, however, we were not getting the ball into the net. For no players were coming back to line up, as they would have done following a goal. Time passed, and I made several advances towards the edge of the penalty area, peering through the murk, which was getting thicker every minute. Still I could see nothing. The Chelsea defence was clearly being run off its feet.

    "After a long time a figure loomed out of the curtain of fog in front of me. It was a policeman, and he gaped at me incredulously. 'What on earth are you doing here?' he gasped. 'The game was stopped a quarter of an hour ago. The field's completely empty'. And when I groped my way to the dressing-room, the rest of the Charlton team, already out of the bath and in their civvies, were convulsed with laughter."

    A great story and a great man but do we believe it? No sounds of any players shouting, no whistles from the ref, and yet.... I know it doesn't really matter, but just wondered.
  • Dazzler21 said:

    Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    Tramp said:

    I thought the Bartram foggy moment was pre-war and at Stamford Bridge.

    No. Happened in the 40s. Was it Christmas Day, or Boxing Day.? Sorry can't remember the exact year. A copper wondered why he was still on the pitch, as the game had been abandoned for some time.
    Nope happened in the 37.


    On Christmas Day 1937, Bartram was in the papers once more after a bizarre incident in a match against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge. With the score at 1-1, the game had to be called off on 61 minutes due to thick fog. Unfortunately for Bartram, he was the last to be made aware. "Soon after the kick-off, [fog] began to thicken rapidly at the far end, travelling past Vic Woodley in the Chelsea goal and rolling steadily towards me," he wrote in his autobiography. "The referee stopped the game, and then, as visibility became clearer, restarted it. We were on top at this time, and I saw fewer and fewer figures as we attacked steadily.

    "I paced up and down my goal-line, happy in the knowledge that Chelsea were being pinned in their own half. 'The boys must be giving the Pensioners the hammer,' I thought smugly, as I stamped my feet for warmth. Quite obviously, however, we were not getting the ball into the net. For no players were coming back to line up, as they would have done following a goal. Time passed, and I made several advances towards the edge of the penalty area, peering through the murk, which was getting thicker every minute. Still I could see nothing. The Chelsea defence was clearly being run off its feet.

    "After a long time a figure loomed out of the curtain of fog in front of me. It was a policeman, and he gaped at me incredulously. 'What on earth are you doing here?' he gasped. 'The game was stopped a quarter of an hour ago. The field's completely empty'. And when I groped my way to the dressing-room, the rest of the Charlton team, already out of the bath and in their civvies, were convulsed with laughter."

    A great story and a great man but do we believe it? No sounds of any players shouting, no whistles from the ref, and yet.... I know it doesn't really matter, but just wondered.
    Sounds unlikely, but willing to suspend disbelief.
  • If it has been colourised correctly, the goal stanchions are red and not a colour I'd have thought Chelsea would have used?
  • Chizz said:

    So, we don't know for sure where or when the picture was taken and we don't know who is in it. Is that about right?

    Not really.

    It is often been used to illustrate the Bartram story but it more than likely Jack Kelsey. That's how the owners of the pic caption it and if you look at the keeper closely it is not Bartram.
    Agree.

    I'm sure I've seen pictures from the SB game and we were wearing black shorts.
  • Reported as Boxing Day 1937?
    07 - .jpg
    960 x 960 - 102K
  • So is there no picture of Bartram in the fog? I always thought this same pic (in black and white) was of that moment but now my dreams are shattered.

    Confirmed or denied?
  • edited January 4
    Re the famous anecdote, was it played behind closed doors, or what were the crowd, St John Ambulance, peanut vendors, etc, supposed to be doing?
  • edited January 4
    Surely, 'without knowing nothing' means Bartram/Kelsey knew something.
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