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Retiring or buying a holiday home in the US

Anyone know much about how long you can stay in the US if you buy a property there? Looking at alternatives to Europe. Retirement a few years off
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  • With a B-2 tourist visa, you can stay up to 6 months although you can apply to stay longer.

    If you enter on a visa waiver, you can stay up to 90 days.
  • As far as I know, there are no restrictions at all on actually purchasing a property.

    BUT you cannot stay longer than 90 days if using the ESTA/Visa waiver scheme.

    If you want to stay longer, you'll need to apply to get a B2 tourist visa which allows stays of 6 months. I think that might involve a trip to the US Embassy for an interview. It does not allow you to work or study in the country. I also believe it expires when your passport expires and has to be renewed. Which is a bummer.

    If you're rolling in it, you can buy a business - a US$1mn spend or $500,000 in a deprived area, get a green card (aka an E-2 investment visa) but numbers of those issued per year are limited.

    In the past, people on the visa waiver programme, as their 90 day limit approached, just used to go to Canada, Mexico or the Caribbean for a few days and then come back for a fresh 90 days. But I have heard that the authorities were cracking down on this wheeze and that's even before they started to get antsy in the Trumpster era. If you've got a property there the last thing you want to do is upset the immigration guys and get yourself on a no-fly list.
  • edited May 20
    Sorry, just want to add there used to be a cunning wheeze on the business thing. It was set up by the Marriott hotel chain. The plan was you'd pay for the construction of a room(s) in one of their new-build hotels. They'd then manage your room on your behalf, take a cut for management exps. and pay you the balance. They also used to guarantee an annual return - maybe 7% or something. This qualified you for a green card. I don't know if the scheme is still running.

    Here's an article about it: https://washingtonpost.com/politics/foreign-citizens-making-big-investments-in-us-in-exchange-for-green-cards/2013/03/21/ecf250d2-8d72-11e2-b63f-f53fb9f2fcb4_story.html?utm_term=.e5a9ec7960d0
  • Make sure you consider the cost of health insurance especially if you have preexisting conditions - can be absolutely extortionate if you plan to spend considerable time there.
  • My sister stayed 27 years mostly in texas , starting as a tourist and only come home when a minor conviction caught up with her, the other sister lived there for her entire adult life (legally) working and paying taxes, although I think they look for citizenship these days.
  • edited May 20

    Anyone know much about how long you can stay in the US if you buy a property there? Looking at alternatives to Europe. Retirement a few years off

    without being TOOOO pessimistic. the USA would be a lovely place to retire to, provided of course that you pick the right location, location, location .. BUT, of course as you get older, health matters become an issue and as we all know, succumbing to a single illness stateside, can result in bankruptcy (see @newyorkaddick above) .. good luck in making a choice .. the world is your oyster
  • Thanks all. Is the 180 days, in any one year? And if you did spend more than half a year you are then liable for US taxes? Just looking at potential options and would do loads of research first. Naples caught our eye on our current holiday. We would still have a place in the UK
  • Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!
  • Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!

    Putting aside the politics and the attitudes of some of the people, America is a beautiful country with a lot of very nice people.
    The downside of retiring anywhere unfamiliar comes down to health. As others have mentioned the USA is not the place to be old and unhealthy.

    When me and the Mrs moved to the seaside here we were surrounded by old Londoners living alone because their dream move was quickly spoiled by one of the partners dying.
  • edited May 20
    Rather live in a sewer pipe in Asia than a condo in the States. Worked for Americans for a few years and they are arrogant scum.
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  • Rather live in a sewer pipe in Asia than a condo in the States. Worked for Americans for a few years and they are arrogant scum.

    For someone so far on the left, that is a remarkable post.
  • Rather live in a sewer pipe in Asia than a condo in the States. Worked for Americans for a few years and they are arrogant scum.

    Well, actually, generally, they aren't. Loud, brash, maybe. Funnily enough I think (perhaps like us) they are worse away from home than at home. I have a theory (perhaps wrong!) that they can feel uncomfortable and even have an inferiority complex when overseas, particularly in the "old world" and it makes them act out of character a bit. Texans are probably perceived as being the worst but back in the Lone Star State they are in my experience charming, couldn't be more friendly and would do anything for you.
  • Agree Americans in America are charming and friendly, most Americans outside I have found to be arseholes. Probably because those are the ones I meet in bars in Asia.

    I see the attraction of living in the US, but for the cost and quality of life I would still prefer to retire to most of SEAsia.
  • Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!

    Why is America not an amazing place? I have not ventured out of Florida but there are some pretty amazing places just in this state.
  • Rather live in a sewer pipe in Asia than a condo in the States. Worked for Americans for a few years and they are arrogant scum.

    bit 'arsh !! .... ((:>)
  • Rather live in a sewer pipe in Asia than a condo in the States. Worked for Americans for a few years and they are arrogant scum.

    If the only Americans I knew were the insecure mildly successful businessmen I worked for/with, I'd probably have a not dissimilar feeling. But most Americans aren't anything like those stereotypical businessmen you occasionally encounter. On the individual level, Americans tend to be a very welcoming and friendly group, especially to people with nice accents.

    NYA with a great shout about healthcare, because not only is it a cost for Premiums just to have access, but depending on the plan you have and any pre-existing conditions, you can end up paying a lot more for care beyond just premiums.

    Lincs with a great point about location. But for retirement, I'd guess you have a lot more flexibility. Do you have a particular area in mind? Or a climate, topography, that sort of thing?
  • edited May 20

    Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!

    Putting aside the politics and the attitudes of some of the people, America is a beautiful country with a lot of very nice people.
    The downside of retiring anywhere unfamiliar comes down to health. As others have mentioned the USA is not the place to be old and unhealthy.

    When me and the Mrs moved to the seaside here we were surrounded by old Londoners living alone because their dream move was quickly spoiled by one of the partners dying.
    I thought you lived in Mottingham ? Mottingham on sea ?
  • Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!

    Putting aside the politics and the attitudes of some of the people, America is a beautiful country with a lot of very nice people.
    The downside of retiring anywhere unfamiliar comes down to health. As others have mentioned the USA is not the place to be old and unhealthy.

    When me and the Mrs moved to the seaside here we were surrounded by old Londoners living alone because their dream move was quickly spoiled by one of the partners dying.
    I thought you lived in Mottingham ? Mottingham on sea ?
    Mottingham now but used to be Winchelsea Beach.
  • Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!

    Putting aside the politics and the attitudes of some of the people, America is a beautiful country with a lot of very nice people.
    The downside of retiring anywhere unfamiliar comes down to health. As others have mentioned the USA is not the place to be old and unhealthy.

    When me and the Mrs moved to the seaside here we were surrounded by old Londoners living alone because their dream move was quickly spoiled by one of the partners dying.
    I thought you lived in Mottingham ? Mottingham on sea ?
    Mottingham now but used to be Winchelsea Beach.
    You "retired" to Mottingham. You've got it the wrong way round :wink:
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  • edited May 20

    Of all the amazing places in this world you could retire or visit, why on earth would you pick the states?!

    Guys I forgot the smiley! I wasn't (completely) serious! ;)
  • Florida is one option we might consider. It's not for a few years. May depend on what happens with Brexit. I wouldn't have chosen to come here on holiday but my partner was at a conference in Orlando so I tagged along and then we had a 9 day holiday. My attitude has completely changed - not as brash and loud etc in lots of place than I expected
  • In my experience outside of the big cities like NY and LA, the Yanks are warm and very friendly (albeit not the brightest).
  • edited May 21
    .
  • Always amazes me that people make generalisations about a country with 350 million people.

    A farmer in rural Alabama has about as much in common with a high tech worker in Seattle as a London city worker does with a bloke slaughtering Moose in Finland.

    Worth remembering that the same country that produced human excrement like Donald Trump also produced Barack Obama, Steve Jobs and Reece Witherspoon.

    True but the high tech worker in Seattle probably didn't start there.


  • Is that not a time share ?
    cafcfan said:

    Sorry, just want to add there used to be a cunning wheeze on the business thing. It was set up by the Marriott hotel chain. The plan was you'd pay for the construction of a room(s) in one of their new-build hotels. They'd then manage your room on your behalf, take a cut for management exps. and pay you the balance. They also used to guarantee an annual return - maybe 7% or something. This qualified you for a green card. I don't know if the scheme is still running.

    Here's an article about it: https://washingtonpost.com/politics/foreign-citizens-making-big-investments-in-us-in-exchange-for-green-cards/2013/03/21/ecf250d2-8d72-11e2-b63f-f53fb9f2fcb4_story.html?utm_term=.e5a9ec7960d0

  • This time last year we were planning to buy a rental property in Florida. Along came Brexit and My savings were worth about $40k less and it was no longer as attractive.
    We'll still do it but the time isn't quite right.
    We did a 5 day viewing trip last year and really liked Reunion and Champions Gate so will probably go for somewhere established and with clubhouse etc.

    I'm not a huge fan of Americans. It have always loved Orlando.

    Take a few trips, see where floats your boat and do your research. Have you considered Hawai'i? Now that's a different proposition altogether
  • shine166 said:



    Is that not a time share ?

    cafcfan said:

    Sorry, just want to add there used to be a cunning wheeze on the business thing. It was set up by the Marriott hotel chain. The plan was you'd pay for the construction of a room(s) in one of their new-build hotels. They'd then manage your room on your behalf, take a cut for management exps. and pay you the balance. They also used to guarantee an annual return - maybe 7% or something. This qualified you for a green card. I don't know if the scheme is still running.

    Here's an article about it: https://washingtonpost.com/politics/foreign-citizens-making-big-investments-in-us-in-exchange-for-green-cards/2013/03/21/ecf250d2-8d72-11e2-b63f-f53fb9f2fcb4_story.html?utm_term=.e5a9ec7960d0

    Not as I understand it. You effectively own the room 365/24/7, (perhaps on a lease) not for a couple of weeks a year. And contract the hotel to manage it on your behalf.
    It's something that is done here too. Here's an example: https://onetouchinvestment.co.uk/hotel-room-investment/?gclid=CPDTqKS6gNQCFdTnGwodhl8GBA (I am not recommending this in any way -it's merely an example from an internet search.)
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