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Inherited gifts you wouldn't part with

i inherited my granny's rocking chair. my dog has chewed both the arms when she was a pup, and its not pretty but i can't part with it. whenever i sit in it i always think of her sitting in it and get a really warm feeling. she died 14 years ago and still miss her.

anyone else kept things they may not even like just because they are inherited and have sentimental value?

Comments

  • edited June 2010
    Nice story. I just wrote two posts but deleted them about little things i have kept from my mum who died 20 years ago which i have but never use. But then realised too personal an not for on here.
  • I had a St Christopher bought by my gran for my 18th birthday, she died a couple of months later...

    One day I lost it, chain broke somehow, was really upset...

    Over 30 years later I was visiting my aunt in Gravesend and she said she had a surprise for me...

    It was only my St Christopher...!!!

    She'd found it years ago down the side of a settee she was about to get rid of, God knows how it got down there...

    I polished it up and it looks brand new...

    Brings back great memories...
  • Miserable old sod I am, but no, I can't attach any importance to an inanimate object. Lost relatives and friends live on in my head.
  • supporting Charlton although more of a curse than a gift sometimes.

    A victorian writing box and my dads army cap badge although hes still alive.

    The most 'valuable' but the one I could never display is a yellow star given to me mum in Berlin in 47 by a german Jew who had survived the war.
  • Shortly before my Mum died I bought her a pair of slippers for her to use in hospital, she only used them a few times....I have them on display in my hall together with my china collection...daft I know but I just can't part with them.
  • My dad's war medals and his programme from the '47 cup final. The only people who will get them are my sons.
  • my nan passed away about a month ago and I've just been given some of her jewellery - she absolutely loved it and I know she wanted all the family to have some. Only small but I'll never part with it.
  • Inherited a number of nik naks when Grandad Soapy passed on to the Royal Eltham in the sky a few years back. One I am particularly proud of is a medal that was struck for all the workers on the old Wembley Stadium in the 1920's(?). The most poignant thing about it though is that he wore it on a chain around his neck for years, and it is "worn" down on both sides just through use. I am filling up just thinking about it !
  • My grandfathers 6 campaign medals and the Royal Engineers book which charts their progress through France to Germany from D day . Not worth anything but wouldnt part with them.
  • An old suitcase from my Uncle full of programmes from the 40's & 50's. Mainly Charlton but quite a few cup finals and other teams too.

    Some of my Grandad's old engineering tools and a casting of a part from a Spitfire he was involved with making.

    My parents have got my Grandad's old piano that will eventually come my way. We've got photos of him playing it in his front garden during the VE day party that was held in the street.

    God knows where it going to go but could never get rid of it.
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  • [cite]Posted By: charltonkeston[/cite]My grandfathers 6 campaign medals and the Royal Engineers book which charts their progress through France to Germany from D day . Not worth anything but wouldnt part with them.

    Not worth anything?
    On the contrary Keston...they're in fact worth a very great deal..............................to you that is.
  • [cite]Posted By: Algarveaddick[/cite]Miserable old sod I am, but no, I can't attach any importance to an inanimate object. Lost relatives and friends live on in my head.

    Oh you are a miserable old so an so!!! lol.
  • edited June 2010
    [cite]Posted By: Curb_It[/cite]
    [cite]Posted By: Algarveaddick[/cite]Miserable old sod I am, but no, I can't attach any importance to an inanimate object. Lost relatives and friends live on in my head.

    Oh you are a miserable old so an so!!! lol.

    Bren..there's a post 'especially for you' in the England Manager no respect thread!
  • Grandad left me his war medals as well as his daily diary when he was serving for the Navy in the second world war. Hundreds of football programmes from the 40's
  • My Grandfathers war medals, drummer boy braids, Hampshire Reg books and loads of pix from India 1923 to 1951 when he retired from army life. One thing I wish I had was the Luger he brought back from the European campaign, it was a trophy picked up when you killed a German officer, when I was 10 he let me fire it, he lived on the 13th floor of flats in Kilburn, he let me fire 2 rounds between the other blocks of flats, my mum went mad, but that irresponsible behaviour is what grandads are for!!! Brilliant bloke, as for the Luger, when he died in 1980 my aunt just put it in her suitcase and took it back to Phoenix USA where she lives, it sits on her mantlepiece, its not been fired since he died.
  • A letter, written by an army officer in 1917 in France, to my grandmother, telling her that my grandfather had been captured by the Germans. The army officer and most of the regiment were killed in battle shortly afterwards, but my grandfather survived. He was lucky to be captured. I wouldn't be here otherwise.

    It was probably the only scrap of paper he could find, but the the person who wrote it took such care to write a long and comforting letter while the world was disintegrating around him. It brings tears to my eyes every time I see it.
  • [cite]Posted By: Vienna_Addick[/cite]A letter, written by an army officer in 1917 in France, to my grandmother, telling her that my grandfather had been captured by the Germans. The army officer and most of the regiment were killed in battle shortly afterwards, but my grandfather survived. He was lucky to be captured. I wouldn't be here otherwise.

    It was probably the only scrap of paper he could find, but the the person who wrote it took such care to write a long and comforting letter while the world was disintegrating around him. It brings tears to my eyes every time I see it.

    If appropriate, would you mind sharing it (or at least some of it) with us Vienna?
  • A dead man's penny from my Grandad's uncle who died in the great war and has the same name as me, as does my Grandad's brother who passed aaway 5 years ago.
  • For SoundAs..

    The letter was hand-written, in pencil, on a scrap of what I remember as a maths school exercise book. The letter starts off with "very sorry to inform you that your husband is missing since November 30, but you should not worry as I am confident that he is now a prisoner in Germany and that you will soon receive confirmation of this from the War Office*. This was still the "stiff upper lip" era, but he apologised for not being able to tell her what had happened and where they were, other than that it was somewhere in France.

    I worked out from his regimental records and via the internet that it must have been the Battle of Cambrai, the first time that tanks were used. The British attacked and gained a lot, in First WW terms, of ground, but on November 30 the Germans counter-attacked, and that was when my grandfather was captured. I also found out the the poor devil who wrote the letter was killed a few weeks later, along with 45000 other British "casualties" and 45000 Germans. All for a net gain of zero yards when the battle ended. Almost a full Wembley Stadium. What a f------ waste!
  • edited June 2010
    Thanks Vienna...and the poor chap was killed just a few weeks later, how very very sad...there have been many crazy wars over the centuries...but can there ever have been one more crazy than the first world war where ancient 'up and at 'em' tactics were used against modern weaponry....well modern for those times shall we say....led like lambs to the slaughter.
    How did the song go......................"Oh Oh Oh What a Lovely War."
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  • im glad i started this thread now. what a sentimental bunch we addicks are. it's funny reading through this thread it is clear most of these gifts only have value to the receiver. another i'd like to add is one from my daughter. when clearing my grandfather's house after he passed away a few years ago my daughter (4) was asked if she would like to take anything as a memento. the only thing a painted wooden duck that sat on the fireplace. it had sat there since i was a kid and probably before. she still has it in her room and it makes me smile when i see it. great pictures have been painted from all your posts. thanks to all.
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