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Scams

In this case an e mail regarding the suspension of my TV License due to being unable to collect the payment. They obviously had my e mail and gave a bogus TV Licence number and amount due.

For your information you can find your actual TV License number by looking at your bank statement and checking reference number of Direct Debit if that’s how you pay. You can of course check your paper license if you can find it. 

Not seen this scam before so thought I would pass it on. 
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Comments

  • Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
  • TV licence scams are one of the most common at the moment, i've had a few variations. Bitcoin is another.
  • Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    HMRC Numbers are 03000.
  • Which have made a video warning about HMRC related scams


  • Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    I've had 2 like this over the past couple of months. 2nd time just shouted "fuck off" down the phone. Obvious scam......as if HMRC are going to call you to say you are being investigated.
  • If I can ever be bothered to talk to a live scammer I always focus on feeding back to them stuff about the language they use and diction, and what they mean by words they use.
    Misheard lyrics if you like. Repeating back to them what you 'think' they have just said. Asking them to adjust their microphone position, or speak more loudly, then more clearly. Basically undermine their faith in their own speaking voice.
    Also asking them what they mean by the word 'accident', or 'injury' can go down a long rabbit hole and wastes their time.
    Then we move on to whether they believe in God or if they are a vegetarian.
  • Anyone get regular calls from 'Beneficial' about surveys?

    I challenged them this week asking about GDPR and advised I wanted to be forgotten and rescinded any consent they had for me to be contacted.

    Their response was just to keep asking if I would complete another survey!

    I have never completed any survey over the phone, or ever given authority for my details to be shared with third parties.
  • Had one yesterday talking about my car accident like it had recently happened. Had I had a car accident, it would have been very believable. Fortunately I hadn't but you can see how they get people. My rule is, even if it sounds genuine, If I want it, I'll look for it.
  • edited August 5


    I keep getting this text . I’ve never used UBER in my life . 
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  • seth plum said:
    If I can ever be bothered to talk to a live scammer I always focus on feeding back to them stuff about the language they use and diction, and what they mean by words they use.
    Misheard lyrics if you like. Repeating back to them what you 'think' they have just said. Asking them to adjust their microphone position, or speak more loudly, then more clearly. Basically undermine their faith in their own speaking voice.
    Also asking them what they mean by the word 'accident', or 'injury' can go down a long rabbit hole and wastes their time.
    Then we move on to whether they believe in God or if they are a vegetarian.
    When I receive the Microsoft security one, nearly always from a ‘daniel’, ‘alan’ or ‘andrew’ with a strong sounding south Asian accent, if I have the time and fancy a wind up I play along by trying to engage in a conversation with them on their pornography viewing preference.
  • Basically emails, phone calls, texts, post - be wary - all can be hacked and tampered with. 

    We had our bank phone us about a fraud.  All very plausible.  Right bank brand etc.   I hung up immediately and found their number on my card and phoned them back - the call had been fake.  

    The fraudsters are getting ever more clever and I know someone who was emailing a supplier of theirs at work, all personal stuff as they were friends, last email from supplier was them saying they had changed their bank details.  Easy to fall for (and sadly they did)... Turned out their suppliers computer had been hacked, the emails were genuine but being watched and the fraudsters just sent the last one on the trail.  Clever/devious.  They walked away with thousands.

    Since lockdown these attempts have ballooned further.

    Be careful and do one of the many training courses on line if you are concerned.
  • edited August 5
    Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    It is all too easy to show a fake phone number on caller ID I'm afraid.  https://www.ofcom.org.uk/phones-telecoms-and-internet/advice-for-consumers/problems/tackling-nuisance-calls-and-messages/phone-spoof-scam
  • After a blissful pause during lockdown, these phone pests seem to be creeping back.

    I had the one about my (non-existent) Amazon account last week & yesterday the "BT" one, that my internet was about to be disconnected (ESI might wish this was true!).  Dare say the helpful lady from Microsoft will be calling me soon...
  • edited August 5


    I keep getting this text . I’ve never used UBER in my life . 
    Weirdly had that today, blocked the number.


  • Had an email from DPD saying they'd tried to deliver a parcel that we werent expecting, 3 times but we werent in(we were),and there was now a charge otherwise the parcel goes back. They wanted €57(?) to deliver it. All looked very genuine and plausible and no doubt some people would fall for it. 
  • Stig said:
    Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    HMRC Numbers are 03000.
    Sadly I think quite a few people will ring back out of panic, using HMRC can sound intimidating. I was tempted to call and mess around but I don't know whether these lowlifes are somehow able to charge you for the call. 
  • Talal said:
    Stig said:
    Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    HMRC Numbers are 03000.
    Sadly I think quite a few people will ring back out of panic, using HMRC can sound intimidating. I was tempted to call and mess around but I don't know whether these lowlifes are somehow able to charge you for the call. 
    Whatever you do don't phone back. It will almost certainly be a premium rate number, not inconceivably charging many pounds per minute.
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  • Talal said:
    Stig said:
    Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    HMRC Numbers are 03000.
    Sadly I think quite a few people will ring back out of panic, using HMRC can sound intimidating. I was tempted to call and mess around but I don't know whether these lowlifes are somehow able to charge you for the call. 
    Whatever you do don't phone back. It will almost certainly be a premium rate number, not inconceivably charging many pounds per minute.
    Yep that's what put me off! I do like the ones that ring and ask me to get my laptop going so they can update security. Always have a good play with them. 
  • Talal said:
    Had a call yesterday from 02079470887, was an automated female voice purporting to be from HMRC effectively saying I need to contact them or face the consequences. Sounded dodgy but googled the number to be sure. 
    This happened to a mate of mine a few weeks back - but an actual call rather than automated. They told him he was under investigation, blah, blah, blah and were so convincing he shat himself at first - even though he works in the tax department of a large organisation.

    Then as the call went on he pulled himself together and when he got the chance asked them which Act it was he was being investigated under. They couldn't answer and then the line suddenly went dead!
  • GF txt me yesterday to say Just got email message "your email is quarantined", (this is her work email but working from home) will get it released & let you know when it's working. Straight away I thought scam, phoned her & asked if she had clicked on any link or anything & she said no she was going to phone her IT dept. so obviously relieved I said good well don't respond just phone your IT because it's almost certainly a scam, to which she replied but the email came from you !!! Somehow the fuckers have used my email address to send her a message. I've not had the chance to have a look at the message yet to check whether it's my address or a very very similar one but seems possible one of us have been hacked. Is there any simple way of checking ? I have received spam from an email address that begins with MY address. I've just ignored them but better open & check whether it is my complete address, if so guess I have a problem ?
  • Basically emails, phone calls, texts, post - be wary - all can be hacked and tampered with. 

    We had our bank phone us about a fraud.  All very plausible.  Right bank brand etc.   I hung up immediately and found their number on my card and phoned them back - the call had been fake.  

    The fraudsters are getting ever more clever and I know someone who was emailing a supplier of theirs at work, all personal stuff as they were friends, last email from supplier was them saying they had changed their bank details.  Easy to fall for (and sadly they did)... Turned out their suppliers computer had been hacked, the emails were genuine but being watched and the fraudsters just sent the last one on the trail.  Clever/devious.  They walked away with thousands.

    Since lockdown these attempts have ballooned further.

    Be careful and do one of the many training courses on line if you are concerned.
    Should always get change of bank details on headed paper & then phone company to confirm. (Bit late now I know!)
  • edited August 5
    I do recall when I was managing an office I was checking expenditure and we had purchased some stationary quite expensively. On investigation, one of our administrators had received a letter saying that they had noticed we were running short of certain items and would we like to purchased some more. It was written as if they were our existing stationers and was all the more believable because we were actually running low. She ordered a few things and they cost about 5 times more than they should have. Not a massive scam but just shows you how it is everywhere. They were a proper company! 
  • I do recall when I was managing an office I was checking expenditure and we had purchased some stationary quite expensively. On investigation, one of our administrators had received a letter saying that they had noticed we were running short of certain items and would we like to purchased some more. It was written as if they were our existing stationers and was all the more believable because we were actually running low. She ordered a few things and they cost about 5 times more than they should have. Not a massive scam but just shows you how it is everywhere. They were a proper company! 

    Similar to when you used to renew your passport or road tax/ driving licence online and companies would pay to have their website at top of google to kid folk into thinking it was the official government website.  They would charge a premium on top of the cost of renewal for renewing said service.  Seemed to be legal at the time but very wrong.

    Not sure if it's been clamped down on since.
  • GF txt me yesterday to say Just got email message "your email is quarantined", (this is her work email but working from home) will get it released & let you know when it's working. Straight away I thought scam, phoned her & asked if she had clicked on any link or anything & she said no she was going to phone her IT dept. so obviously relieved I said good well don't respond just phone your IT because it's almost certainly a scam, to which she replied but the email came from you !!! Somehow the fuckers have used my email address to send her a message. I've not had the chance to have a look at the message yet to check whether it's my address or a very very similar one but seems possible one of us have been hacked. Is there any simple way of checking ? I have received spam from an email address that begins with MY address. I've just ignored them but better open & check whether it is my complete address, if so guess I have a problem ?
    Its VERY easy to send an email marked with any address as the sender. You don't have to hack anything to do that!

    It's no different to receiving a letter in the post which has the name of the sender written on the outside of the envelope. Anyone could have sent that letter! The post office don't check that it actually comes from who it says it does.
  • GF txt me yesterday to say Just got email message "your email is quarantined", (this is her work email but working from home) will get it released & let you know when it's working. Straight away I thought scam, phoned her & asked if she had clicked on any link or anything & she said no she was going to phone her IT dept. so obviously relieved I said good well don't respond just phone your IT because it's almost certainly a scam, to which she replied but the email came from you !!! Somehow the fuckers have used my email address to send her a message. I've not had the chance to have a look at the message yet to check whether it's my address or a very very similar one but seems possible one of us have been hacked. Is there any simple way of checking ? I have received spam from an email address that begins with MY address. I've just ignored them but better open & check whether it is my complete address, if so guess I have a problem ?
    Its VERY easy to send an email marked with any address as the sender. You don't have to hack anything to do that!

    It's no different to receiving a letter in the post which has the name of the sender written on the outside of the envelope. Anyone could have sent that letter! The post office don't check that it actually comes from who it says it does.
    Ok thanks just out of interest would you explain to a computer simpleton how they would be able to show my email address as the sender. Howwould I do it if I wanted to ( I don't :-):smiley )
  • i replied nice try dickhead 
  • GF txt me yesterday to say Just got email message "your email is quarantined", (this is her work email but working from home) will get it released & let you know when it's working. Straight away I thought scam, phoned her & asked if she had clicked on any link or anything & she said no she was going to phone her IT dept. so obviously relieved I said good well don't respond just phone your IT because it's almost certainly a scam, to which she replied but the email came from you !!! Somehow the fuckers have used my email address to send her a message. I've not had the chance to have a look at the message yet to check whether it's my address or a very very similar one but seems possible one of us have been hacked. Is there any simple way of checking ? I have received spam from an email address that begins with MY address. I've just ignored them but better open & check whether it is my complete address, if so guess I have a problem ?
    Its VERY easy to send an email marked with any address as the sender. You don't have to hack anything to do that!

    It's no different to receiving a letter in the post which has the name of the sender written on the outside of the envelope. Anyone could have sent that letter! The post office don't check that it actually comes from who it says it does.
    Ok thanks just out of interest would you explain to a computer simpleton how they would be able to show my email address as the sender. Howwould I do it if I wanted to ( I don't :-):smiley )
    Well maybe it's not that "VERY easy"  :-).

    But you would just write a small program which packaged up an email (with a fake sender address) and "posted" it into the internet in the same way that you might write a letter and drop it into the post box.

    In the real world, people don't usually write programs to send email but use Outlook or Gmail to do it for them. And, of course, these systems deliberately don't allow you to supply a fake sender address! It wouldn't be great publicity for Microsoft if Outlook could by used to conveniently send spam.

    The problem is that email was established forty years ago as a cheap and nasty way for computer nerds to communicate via the Internet. We were all very innocent in those days and didn't think about how it could be abused! It's fine so long as you remember that it's not secure and there is no one officially responsible for making it secure. 

    Sometimes I think Microsoft and Google like to make Email look better than it really is but you can't really blame them for trying to make things better! 
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