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  • I like this. Footballers have never shown Referees enough respect.
  • Good god. The FA have done something sensible.
  • Who polices the sin bins?
    Genuine question. 
  • Interesting.
    I think it’s a good idea overall, but I’m concerned by the lack of balance in the article - where is the criticism? How could it be improved? I’m pretty confident that you won’t find 100% of people supporting the move in its piloted form.

    I was also initially a little puzzled by the yellow card element of it too - why a yellow card if it means something different to a normal yellow card? I know the ref has to clearly point to the bench, or whatever, but why not just make it a different colour card? I guess because it’s still a ‘caution’? I don’t know, maybe it just won’t be an issue.

    Finally, I found this table regarding different sequences of events interesting. Note that you’re effectively sent off for a normal yellow and two sin bins, whereas your game is over, but you can be substituted for just two sin bins.
    It’ll take people a bit of time to get used to this...
  • But my worry, you send a wound up player to the bin (on the sidelines) where spectators, substitutes etc have all seen what they were sin binned for. 
    Who is going to stop it from continuing on the sidelines?
  • Who polices the sin bins?
    Genuine question. 
     4th Official and the Ref? Seems logical to me. 
  • Dazzler21 said:
    Who polices the sin bins?
    Genuine question. 
     4th Official and the Ref? Seems logical to me. 
    Is there always a 4th Official in non league etc?
    Again genuine question as it’s been years since I watched it. 
  • Should be at all levels or none.
  • MrOneLung said:
    Should be at all levels or none.
    You think they should drop an untested change in to all levels?
    What’s wrong with running a pilot scheme followed by a wider pilot scheme in order to get it right?
  • should be at all levels .. and a sin binning should also attract a one game ban, as presumably the offence is worse than a yellow card and not so bad as to attract a red card
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  • should be at all levels .. and a sin binning should also attract a one game ban, as presumably the offence is worse than a yellow card and not so bad as to attract a red card
    I’ll just ask the same question as I did in the post directly before yours:

    You think they should drop an untested change in to all levels?
    What’s wrong with running a pilot scheme followed by a wider pilot scheme in order to get it right?
  • Werent sin bins trialled in the Conference a season or two ago or have I just made that up - I swear someone mentioned on here that something was tested at that level but wasnt taken any further
  • My opinion has always been:

    A red card should be for violent conduct (which includes dangerous tackles) and manhandling the ref;

    Automatic sin bin for a foul that denies a clear goal-scoring opportunity, dissent to referee/lino.

    Sin bin for a second yellow card. This would save players being sent off for two trivial bookable offences.

    Extended sin bin for third (or more!) yellow.

    Yellow cards dished out for fouls/time-wasting as they are now.
  • edited July 30
    should be at all levels .. and a sin binning should also attract a one game ban, as presumably the offence is worse than a yellow card and not so bad as to attract a red card
    I’ll just ask the same question as I did in the post directly before yours:

    You think they should drop an untested change in to all levels?
    What’s wrong with running a pilot scheme followed by a wider pilot scheme in order to get it right?
    I should have quoted your previous post .. any change is always problematic and I think the higher the level it's introduced at, the less problematic it will be .. I can imagine a few hyped up lower leaguers taking a pop at the referee and refusing to go and 'take ten' causing mayhem and total chaos .. on the other hand, a knackered player might get lippy just to get a nice sit down  ..  'real' pros will be more tolerant as their jobs depend on being good lads when all's said and done .. the announcement is very late. Clubs should have been informed of this in May/June, giving time to prepare. It's doubtful now if the sin bin will be introduced into the EFL/Prem for a couple of years, unfortunately ..incidentally there are quite a few law changes in play from this season .. https://www.qpr.co.uk/news/club-news/new-football-law-changes-for-201920/

    On the youtube commentary of our game v Villa, the commentator got all bothered when Amos rolled the ball out to Solly from a GK and Solly played it before the ball left the pen area, he was demanding a re-take.
    Back to sin bins, perhaps too many changes will have us all confused, players, refs and fans
  • Werent sin bins trialled in the Conference a season or two ago or have I just made that up - I swear someone mentioned on here that something was tested at that level but wasnt taken any further
    I’ve no idea, but you may well be right. If so, it further supports the idea that trials are the way to do it.
    If the trial you remember was flawed, the powers that be presumably looked at the criticisms and rethought it, resulting in the recent 31 league trial the article speaks of. The article suggests that that trial was successful, leading to this wider trial.
  • edited July 30
    should be at all levels .. and a sin binning should also attract a one game ban, as presumably the offence is worse than a yellow card and not so bad as to attract a red card
    I’ll just ask the same question as I did in the post directly before yours:

    You think they should drop an untested change in to all levels?
    What’s wrong with running a pilot scheme followed by a wider pilot scheme in order to get it right?
    I should have quoted your previous post .. any change is always problematic and I think the higher the level it's introduced at, the less problematic it will be .. I can imagine a few hyped up lower leaguers taking a pop at the referee and refusing to go and 'take ten' causing mayhem and total chaos .. on the other hand, a knackered player might get lippy just to get a nice sit down  ..  'real' pros will be more tolerant as their jobs depend on being good lads when all's said and done .. the announcement is very late. Clubs should have been informed of this in May/June, giving time to prepare. It's doubtful now if the sin bin will be introduced into the EFL/Prem for a couple of years, unfortunately ..incidentally there are quite a few law changes in play from this season .. https://www.qpr.co.uk/news/club-news/new-football-law-changes-for-201920/

    On the youtube commentary of our game v Villa, the commentator got all bothered when Amos rolled the ball out to Solly from a GK and Solly played it before the ball left the pen area, he was demanding a re-take.
    Back to sin bins, perhaps too many changes will have us all confused, players, refs and fans
    Fair dos @Lincsaddick
    However, I don’t agree that introducing it to the top level first would be wise.
    Apart from anything else, there will inevitably be flaws in the first draft of anything. If you use a first draft at the top level, the effects of the rule change could end up having an enormous negative effect on the game in general. With the greatest of respect, grassroots football is where innovation and change should be introduced, because it can filter out negative effects and feed positive effects up the chain.

    Also, one big issue in my opinion is that change at the top level (even when trialled) is inevitably hypercriticised by pundits. Imagine the degree of criticism if a top level trial had some ‘first draft’ flaws? Idiots like Danny Mills and Robbie Savage would dismiss all other views because they’ve played the game at the top level. The public, for whatever reason, listen to these people and changes wouldn’t have a chance.

    The biggest issue I have with this is what support is being provided to grassroots football for doing all this grunt work that will benefit the rich teams down the line. I would like to think the grassroots leagues get some added financial support from the EPL and EFL when these things happen, but I don’t know if they do.
  • I’ll let Gaz Mentan know, but how many seats does it have ?
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Roland Out!