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Women's football in Plumstead 1950s

Sorting through a donation from Jean Tindell and came across these two programmes.

Does anyone have more information or recognise any names?

Babs Fish is now my favourite player name.


Comments

  • Impressive number of SE London players 
  • P Mead made me laugh.
  • I think the shocking thing is that you couldn’t get a 51 bus to Swingate Lane. 

  • The Woodman was a great little pub.
  • Used to drink in the Woodman in the 70s. Had an old bald bloke on the piano who'd play anything for a drink. Happy days. 
  • Hang on, I thought women’s football was against the law at that time?
  • 2 at the back, 3 in midfield and 5 up front !
  • edited July 3
    buckshee said:
    Hang on, I thought women’s football was against the law at that time?
    No, it was effectively banned by the FA who stopped women playing on any FA affiliated ground.

    That killed the very popular women's game in 1921.

    This is why these programmes are so interesting and possibly historically significant as they record a hidden history of women playing football during the ban period.

    It was never against the law of the land so not illegal.

  • I think the shocking thing is that you couldn’t get a 51 bus to Swingate Lane. 


    There was no 51 route in Plumstead then, I don't remember the 53 being called the 53a, the 153 only ran on Sundays
  • I see the programme cost sixpence, that would have been expensive in 1950, I suppose the profit went towards  the rebuilding fund of P.C.W.C
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  • I see the programme cost sixpence, that would have been expensive in 1950, I suppose the profit went towards  the rebuilding fund of P.C.W.C
    May also have doubled up as entrance fee
  • I see the programme cost sixpence, that would have been expensive in 1950, I suppose the profit went towards  the rebuilding fund of P.C.W.C
    May also have doubled up as entrance fee
    Yes I think you are right, that would have been the entrance fee, as you were not allowed to charge to watch sport on a Sunday then.
  • Used to drink in the Woodman in the 70s. Had an old bald bloke on the piano who'd play anything for a drink. Happy days. 
    was his name Albert ?


  • shine166 said:
    Used to drink in the Woodman in the 70s. Had an old bald bloke on the piano who'd play anything for a drink. Happy days. 
    was his name Albert ?


     Very good, but then he did sink a few. 

  • There was no 51 route in Plumstead then, I don't remember the 53 being called the 53a, the 153 only ran on Sundays
    At the risk of damaging the reputation of this forum further...

    The 53A became the 53 in late 1952 (more here) - as the original 53 had disappeared by then.

  • There was no 51 route in Plumstead then, I don't remember the 53 being called the 53a, the 153 only ran on Sundays
    At the risk of damaging the reputation of this forum further...

    The 53A became the 53 in late 1952 (more here) - as the original 53 had disappeared by then.

    Thank you for that, I grew up in Plumstead around that time, so am interested in memories of then.

  • There was no 51 route in Plumstead then, I don't remember the 53 being called the 53a, the 153 only ran on Sundays
    At the risk of damaging the reputation of this forum further...

    The 53A became the 53 in late 1952 (more here) - as the original 53 had disappeared by then.
    Thank you. 

    Another point of interest, Nth Woolwich was north of the Thames but part of Kent according to an 18th or 19th century map I’ve seen.

    Also, homer ref in both games so I’m hoping London won. 
  • AddicksAddict said:

    Another point of interest, Nth Woolwich was north of the Thames but part of Kent according to an 18th or 19th century map I’ve seen.
    Yes, much of North Woolwich was part of the Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich and in the London County Council area until they messed about with it in 1965 (East and West Ham county boroughs were part of Essex until then) - the older houses in Barge House Road were early Woolwich Borough council houses, and there's a couple of Woolwich Borough Council buildings still there (the disused electric sub station just by the north side ferry approach, and the derelict bogs next to the police station)

    The borough boundaries on the north side between Beckton and Silvertown (involving West Ham, East Ham and Woolwich boroughs) seem a bit strange (see 1950s OS map here - you can move around most of London and swap to 1890s map as well) - I have read it was something to do with manorial boundaries when England was carved up by William the Conquerer, presumably to give several of his mates a bit of river front (the Thames being the main road to London at that time, of course)
  • AddicksAddict said:

    Another point of interest, Nth Woolwich was north of the Thames but part of Kent according to an 18th or 19th century map I’ve seen.
    Yes, much of North Woolwich was part of the Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich and in the London County Council area until they messed about with it in 1965 (East and West Ham county boroughs were part of Essex until then) - the older houses in Barge House Road were early Woolwich Borough council houses, and there's a couple of Woolwich Borough Council buildings still there (the disused electric sub station just by the north side ferry approach, and the derelict bogs next to the police station)

    The borough boundaries on the north side between Beckton and Silvertown (involving West Ham, East Ham and Woolwich boroughs) seem a bit strange (see 1950s OS map here - you can move around most of London and swap to 1890s map as well) - I have read it was something to do with manorial boundaries when England was carved up by William the Conquerer, presumably to give several of his mates a bit of river front (the Thames being the main road to London at that time, of course)
    As boys we used to go over to North Woolwich on the Ferry, then when older used to drink in the pubs over there,, Royal Pavilion always had a group playing at the weekends went over there recently and the pubs are all long gone, apart from the Royal Standard which looked on its last legs.
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  • Should I be surprised to see football referred to as ‘soccer’ in 1950’s England?
  • meldrew66 said:
    Should I be surprised to see football referred to as ‘soccer’ in 1950’s England?
    Not really.

    Soccer is an English word coined here in the 19th century and commonly used ever since.

    It's only in the last 25 years or so with the rise of US soccer that some have thought it an American term.
  • Fantastic mapping link that @CatfordCat, like catnip for me, seeing todays streets and buildings mapped on historic maps. Have long wanted access to a site like this. Have been using the 'spy' feature and will explore more.
    Thanks very much for posting.

    https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=16&lat=51.4995&lon=0.0629&layers=173&b=1
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