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PSA Blood Test results...

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  • edited June 8
    JamesSeed said:
    Never had a psa test. How accurate are they as in past had 2 conflicting views as to whether to have one. 
    @HardyAddick The PSA test is very accurate at measuring the level of prostate-specific antigen.  However, if you have a high result, it doesn't tell you what's causing that result so you would then need to have further investigations, probably beginning with an MRI.

    Unless you're totally phobic about needles, the test is a doddle so I'd strongly advise you to get a test done.  If you are totally phobic about needles, close your eyes and get a test done.

    Re "had 2 conflicting views", I'd be interested in what the "don't have the test" arguments were.
    In the days before MRI scans were offered prior to any treatment, the next step after a high reading, would normally be a biopsy. The biopsy procedure can lead to unpleasant side effects. Best to look those up online. 
    Not strictly true.  Next step after high PSA reading, given such a reason could be a number of triggers, was a course of tablets to attempt to reduce the PSA reading; then the biopsy 
  • It may have been the side effects that were mentioned negatively. Anyway, booked in to see doctor. 
  • PeterGage said:
    JamesSeed said:
    Never had a psa test. How accurate are they as in past had 2 conflicting views as to whether to have one. 
    @HardyAddick The PSA test is very accurate at measuring the level of prostate-specific antigen.  However, if you have a high result, it doesn't tell you what's causing that result so you would then need to have further investigations, probably beginning with an MRI.

    Unless you're totally phobic about needles, the test is a doddle so I'd strongly advise you to get a test done.  If you are totally phobic about needles, close your eyes and get a test done.

    Re "had 2 conflicting views", I'd be interested in what the "don't have the test" arguments were.
    In the days before MRI scans were offered prior to any treatment, the next step after a high reading, would normally be a biopsy. The biopsy procedure can lead to unpleasant side effects. Best to look those up online. 
    Not strictly true.  Next step after high PSA reading, given such a reason could be a number of triggers, was a course of tablets to attempt to reduce the PSA reading; then the biopsy 
    True enough, but my sister in law was a GP up north, and I know this happened sometimes, especially with a very high reading. We talked about it when I had my high reading. 
  • JamesSeed said:
    PeterGage said:
    JamesSeed said:
    Never had a psa test. How accurate are they as in past had 2 conflicting views as to whether to have one. 
    @HardyAddick The PSA test is very accurate at measuring the level of prostate-specific antigen.  However, if you have a high result, it doesn't tell you what's causing that result so you would then need to have further investigations, probably beginning with an MRI.

    Unless you're totally phobic about needles, the test is a doddle so I'd strongly advise you to get a test done.  If you are totally phobic about needles, close your eyes and get a test done.

    Re "had 2 conflicting views", I'd be interested in what the "don't have the test" arguments were.
    In the days before MRI scans were offered prior to any treatment, the next step after a high reading, would normally be a biopsy. The biopsy procedure can lead to unpleasant side effects. Best to look those up online. 
    Not strictly true.  Next step after high PSA reading, given such a reason could be a number of triggers, was a course of tablets to attempt to reduce the PSA reading; then the biopsy 
    True enough, but my sister in law was a GP up north, and I know this happened sometimes, especially with a very high reading. We talked about it when I had my high reading. 
    Dont want to labour the point, but I have gone through the whole process and I was given a course of tablets to attempt to reduce my high PSA level (14). My PSA level did not reduce and the next step was a biopsy.
  • As one of the unlucky 13,I am now due to see consultant 4th July.Last year i also got a red with 7.9 but this came down to 6.6 after 2 more tests,i had mri  scan, agreed to a biopsy(reluctantly ) but heard no more from hospital.It was only  because of the convenence that I had the test done again on easter monday  and was a bit shocked it came back at 10.3.not panicking yet,but anyone who has doubts about getting this test done should really overcome them and get it done.
  • PeterGage said:
    As one of the unlucky 13,I am now due to see consultant 4th July.Last year i also got a red with 7.9 but this came down to 6.6 after 2 more tests,i had mri  scan, agreed to a biopsy(reluctantly ) but heard no more from hospital.It was only  because of the convenence that I had the test done again on easter monday  and was a bit shocked it came back at 10.3.not panicking yet,but anyone who has doubts about getting this test done should really overcome them and get it done.
    All the very best. If it is of any comfort, my first reading was 14 and after a few months of treatment (biopsy and radiotheraphy), I am now fine (5 years later). Latest reading was 0.8
    Good news Peter!
  • JamesSeed said:
    Never had a psa test. How accurate are they as in past had 2 conflicting views as to whether to have one. 
    @HardyAddick The PSA test is very accurate at measuring the level of prostate-specific antigen.  However, if you have a high result, it doesn't tell you what's causing that result so you would then need to have further investigations, probably beginning with an MRI.

    Unless you're totally phobic about needles, the test is a doddle so I'd strongly advise you to get a test done.  If you are totally phobic about needles, close your eyes and get a test done.

    Re "had 2 conflicting views", I'd be interested in what the "don't have the test" arguments were.
    In the days before MRI scans were offered prior to any treatment, the next step after a high reading, would normally be a biopsy. The biopsy procedure can lead to unpleasant side effects. Best to look those up online. 
    OK. Fortunately we have MRI so now there’s no need not have the test. 
  • BBC news today...there is a trial going on in London to replace  a PSA test with an MRI scan, which it is claimed to be cheaper, quicker and more efficient.
  • I decided I should have the PSA test, due to CAFC raising awareness.
    I had the blood test Tuesday & got the result today.
    The speed of receiving the result was much quicker than the angst of waiting weeks via CAFC.
    Anyway, I was 2.2 so all ok.
    Best wishes to everyone with ongoing issues.
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