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Chromebooks

edited December 2018 in Not Sports Related
I need to get a new laptop for a contract starting in the new year. I have never bought a Chromebook, but am interested in doing so and wondered if any Lifers have good advice about choosing one or, indeed, whether they are a good idea.

As background, I will be using it almost exclusively to send and receive emails and to use a few applications that are available as chrome versions: Hootsuite, Canva, Dropbox and as well as social media sites.

So, Lifers, what say you? Is Chromebook a good, cheap, viable alternative to a more Expensive Windows laptop? And if so, which brands and models are good?

Comments

  • edited December 2018
    Chromebooks use the cloud for most of their storage but you want to have one with at least a 32gb hd and I'd also advise you get one with 4gb+ of ram. You should also consider a Chromebook with a touchscreen as a lot of Android apps work better with one.
  • I bought one about a year ago. It has lots of strengths and will do the things you mention very well. Personally though, I wish I'd bought an old school laptop. There are too many little annoyances linked to cloud storage and a lack of little familiar things from Windows, e.g. no snipping tool. They might well be the future, but for now I'd say it's not quite worth it.
  • I've a cheap, Chromebook which is absolutely brilliant for doing simple bits and bobs while out and about, but I wouldn't want to solely rely on it.
  • Thanks all. I intend to use it just for those tasks on a couple of days a week; and then use a "proper" laptop for the rest of the week to complete more complicated stuff. So it seems like it will meet my requirements nicely.
  • I've used a Chromebook for years now and it does everything I want (save for updating my satnav). I love its simplicity with its auto updates. However, one annoying thing though, it will stop working (normally 5 years from production date) when the support finishes and you'll stop receiving Chrome OS updates.

    My last Chromebook started to peter out when I began getting warning messages that support had ended and an urgent upgrade required (read chuck machine away and buy a new one). I was a bit peeved tbh, but decided to buy a new one as it was less than £200 and had been so easy to use. The great thing is it is a seamless changeover. As you open the lid of the new machine everything is there waiting for you in the cloud, just as you left it.
  • I've used a Chromebook for years now and it does everything I want (save for updating my satnav). I love its simplicity with its auto updates. However, one annoying thing though, it will stop working (normally 5 years from production date) when the support finishes and you'll stop receiving Chrome OS updates.

    My last Chromebook started to peter out when I began getting warning messages that support had ended and an urgent upgrade required (read chuck machine away and buy a new one). I was a bit peeved tbh, but decided to buy a new one as it was less than £200 and had been so easy to use. The great thing is it is a seamless changeover. As you open the lid of the new machine everything is there waiting for you in the cloud, just as you left it.

    Thank you - that's very reassuring. I usually use dropbox to store files in the cloud. Do you know if there are any issues with this @Raith_C_Chattonell ?
  • I'm no expert @Chizz but note there are plenty of Youtube videos suggesting that all is well.

  • @Chizz having never had a Chromebook, I couldn't comment whether they're a good or bad idea (although I wouldn't trust Google as a company as far as I could throw them). However, if you have a 'normal' laptop already, why don't you just use that for everything?
  • @Chizz having never had a Chromebook, I couldn't comment whether they're a good or bad idea (although I wouldn't trust Google as a company as far as I could throw them). However, if you have a 'normal' laptop already, why don't you just use that for everything?

    My normal laptop is a bit big to lug around. I'm starting a contract this month that will require me to be in a client's office two days a week. So I need a smaller, lighter pc that can do everything I need each day, but that is lower spec (and cost) than the "main" one.
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  • Chizz said:

    @Chizz having never had a Chromebook, I couldn't comment whether they're a good or bad idea (although I wouldn't trust Google as a company as far as I could throw them). However, if you have a 'normal' laptop already, why don't you just use that for everything?

    My normal laptop is a bit big to lug around. I'm starting a contract this month that will require me to be in a client's office two days a week. So I need a smaller, lighter pc that can do everything I need each day, but that is lower spec (and cost) than the "main" one.
    Providing you’re not needing to work offline then a Chromebook will do you fine. Better spec for less money but they are very much reliant on being connected to the internet.

  • I have had to be convinced by all this. I am old school IT so am still digesting Bill Gates and Microsoft taking over the world...

    We have had Chromebooks at work and once the powers that be beefed up wifi, they work fine. Fast, simple and once you are used to the vagaries of "the Cloud", workable. We have just replaced our desktops with Chromeboxes recently and I must say impressed so far.
  • Chizz said:

    @Chizz having never had a Chromebook, I couldn't comment whether they're a good or bad idea (although I wouldn't trust Google as a company as far as I could throw them). However, if you have a 'normal' laptop already, why don't you just use that for everything?

    My normal laptop is a bit big to lug around. I'm starting a contract this month that will require me to be in a client's office two days a week. So I need a smaller, lighter pc that can do everything I need each day, but that is lower spec (and cost) than the "main" one.
    Providing you’re not needing to work offline then a Chromebook will do you fine. Better spec for less money but they are very much reliant on being connected to the internet.

    Is it possible to be offline anymore, Unless it's by choice?

    Surely everyone has 4g on their phone? Wifi in my office blows, so I regularly turn on my hotspot.
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