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Nissan Leaf (electric car)

Has anyone on CL got one of those?
I'm keen on hearing what it's like. Pros, cons.

Seriously thinking about getting one for work, as I daily drive around Auckland for client visits.
Especially with the rising petrol prices.

According to my calculations, it's approx 5 times cheaper to drive an electric car.
The cons is that you in a car like the Nissan Leaf only can expect around 60-70 miles out of a full battery. But then again, I would use the car for work, where I never travel that much in a day anyway. And if I for some reason had to do a longer distance in a day, there's the fast charging stations around, where your battery is nearly fully charged in 25 mins or so.
When charged at home overnight, it takes around 8 hours for a full battery.

The Leaf model that I might buy in the not too far distant future, there's 24Kwh in a battery.
Let’s say the battery is down to 75%.
That’s 18Kwh.
We currently pay 23.29 cents per Kwh. That's 12 pence.
A full battery would cost $4.19 (£2.16)

From what I understand, a full battery at 75% level will take you 60 miles.
Therefore, 60 miles in a Nissan Leaf will cost approx $4.19 (£2.16)

I normally get around 300 miles out of a full tank in my Mitsubishi Colt.
The 47 litre tank currently costs $107.16 (£55) to fill. (This is actually going up by another 5% in a couple of months time).
Divide that by 5, so we’re near 60 miles.
Therefore, 60 miles in my Mitsubishi Colt will cost approx $21.40 (£11)

I haven't included the savings regarding car servicing.
The service is rare for an electric car, as it only contains around 20 moving parts (I read…), where a petrol car contains approx 2000 moving parts, which require oil and/or regular servicing.

I know that the battery degrades, but read the following:
Nissan warrants the Leaf's battery against defects for 8 years/100,000 miles. It projects its life for at least 10 years, with the expectation that you'd have around 60-70 percent battery life at that point, depending on usage patterns.
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Comments

  • edited August 15
    Depreciation on the Leaf here in the U.S. is horrible, so an almost new "gently used" Leaf can be bought much more cheaply, no idea if that's the case in your part of the world. A lot of the cab companies in D.C. are using them, so I'd assume they're reliable and inexpensive to run. Actually they're allowed to pull into the Nissan dealers around town and recharge for free.
  • We had them as Work card during the olympics we left them in charge and didn’t drive them that’s my answer were a load of shite
  • I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.
  • Beardface said:

    I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.

    I thought the Ioniq was a hybrid? I noticed they were reasonably cheap on a lease so assumed they were hybrid.

    Interesting to hear your experience on the PHEV. We test drove one about 18 months ago and had it for the weekend with the view that we would lease one through the wife's company car leasing scheme.

    Found it really nippy from a standing start and it was a good drive. The wife was put off by its looks more than anything. Something made her think it looked like a hearse. We also wanted the flexibility of 7 seats and it only came with 5.

    Patiently waiting to get our hands on the hybrid version of the XC90 now. Stunning car, does everything bar giving you a happy ending (the massage seats are awesome) but comes with a hefty price tag.
  • One of my friends had one of the 1st gen leafs and absolutely loved it as a local run around and absolutely sweared by it.

    He has since upgraded to a Tesla Model S.
  • JohnBoyUK said:

    Beardface said:

    I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.

    I thought the Ioniq was a hybrid? I noticed they were reasonably cheap on a lease so assumed they were hybrid.

    Interesting to hear your experience on the PHEV. We test drove one about 18 months ago and had it for the weekend with the view that we would lease one through the wife's company car leasing scheme.

    Found it really nippy from a standing start and it was a good drive. The wife was put off by its looks more than anything. Something made her think it looked like a hearse. We also wanted the flexibility of 7 seats and it only came with 5.

    Patiently waiting to get our hands on the hybrid version of the XC90 now. Stunning car, does everything bar giving you a happy ending (the massage seats are awesome) but comes with a hefty price tag.
    I'm really happy with it. Got got through the company car scheme - probably wouldn't actually pay for one outright given the price. Comfortable, efficient, massive!

    XC90 is great but not worth the money (to me).

    The Ioniq comes in petrol, hybrid or full battery. You can choose which one. Also the new Prius comes as full electric too, but you have to look like a minicab driver!
  • I drove too fast and turned over a new Leaf. I don't drive so fast any more.
  • Don't know anything specific about this but did read an article a while back that said in a crash the batteries are likely to explode whixh can get rather nasty.
  • My mate Russell has a couple of old ones.
  • Sponsored links:


  • Had one of these to test drive for a week ..... Did not like the look of the car outside but lovely inside and drove very very well, was top of the range model. Problem was the battery, with minimum use on more than one occasion had to drive home with wipers, radio, air con etc off, otherwise would not have made it home. Also very few charging points where I live. I gather the newer model has a better battery life though and charging points getting more available.
  • A lad at work had one for about 6 months, he got rid in the end because of the range anxiety, used to travel from Chelmsford to Dartford.
  • I drive a Kia Niro PHEV as a company car, it has the benefit of being able to drive on electric only (range of about 36 miles) with the backup of petrol engine. When driving, mainly motorway, the engine can also regenerate the battery. This is a fantastic for reducing company car tax liability as it only has a co2 of 29g. OK, it want make you smile when you drive it but it has everything you could ask for.
  • I'll be test driving a Leaf for a weekend in mid September. Will be looking forward to seeing how much I can get out of a full battery.
  • This is an informative site for electric cars.

    https://www.goultralow.com/
  • I found a great deal and purchased a Nissan Leaf 2012 (gen 1) for NZ$10k (£5k).
    Battery State of Health was 75.5, but has gone up to 76.2%, after driving it for a week.
    I love it. Absolutely love it.
    Fun to drive and I can't imagine I'll ever buy a petrol car again for work commute.
    I'll slow charge it at home for a full battery. Otherwise there are plenty of quick charge stations across Auckland. 30 mins gives you an 80% full battery.
    A full battery gives me approx 110km, but should be around 120km, if I choose to drive Eco mode.
  • edited November 6
    Those quick charge machines should only be used in an emergency, pretty sure they destroy your battery.
  • Those quick charge machines should only be used in an emergency, pretty sure they destroy your battery.

    A bit of a myth (that's what I've been told anyway).
    Don't full charge your car. Charge it to around 80%.
    I've spoken to people who charges their car more with quick charge than slow charge and they've done it for years with no issues (quick drop in the battery's State of Health)
  • Danepak said:

    Those quick charge machines should only be used in an emergency, pretty sure they destroy your battery.

    A bit of a myth (that's what I've been told anyway).
    Don't full charge your car. Charge it to around 80%.
    I've spoken to people who charges their car more with quick charge than slow charge and they've done it for years with no issues (quick drop in the battery's State of Health)
    Fair enough, you must have better chargers than we do here, I used to use the quick chargers a lot and my battery was knackered after a year,the next one last almost 3 with no quick charges! Icould have just got sold a dud previously though, foreigners are often seen as an easy target here.
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  • JohnBoyUK said:

    Beardface said:

    I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.

    I thought the Ioniq was a hybrid? I noticed they were reasonably cheap on a lease so assumed they were hybrid.
    I'm looking at an Ioniq hybrid on a company employee scheme. I think you can get full electric or hybrid, but I can only get the latter. If anyone has a review I am all ears.

  • Danepak said:

    I found a great deal and purchased a Nissan Leaf 2012 (gen 1) for NZ$10k (£5k).
    Battery State of Health was 75.5, but has gone up to 76.2%, after driving it for a week.
    I love it. Absolutely love it.
    Fun to drive and I can't imagine I'll ever buy a petrol car again for work commute.
    I'll slow charge it at home for a full battery. Otherwise there are plenty of quick charge stations across Auckland. 30 mins gives you an 80% full battery.
    A full battery gives me approx 110km, but should be around 120km, if I choose to drive Eco mode.

    You would have to work fairly local would't you. If a full charge gives you 110km (68 miles) then an 80% charge will give you in the region of 81km (50 miles) which equates to 25 miles each way.
  • JohnBoyUK said:

    Beardface said:

    I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.

    I thought the Ioniq was a hybrid? I noticed they were reasonably cheap on a lease so assumed they were hybrid.

    Interesting to hear your experience on the PHEV. We test drove one about 18 months ago and had it for the weekend with the view that we would lease one through the wife's company car leasing scheme.

    Found it really nippy from a standing start and it was a good drive. The wife was put off by its looks more than anything. Something made her think it looked like a hearse. We also wanted the flexibility of 7 seats and it only came with 5.

    Patiently waiting to get our hands on the hybrid version of the XC90 now. Stunning car, does everything bar giving you a happy ending (the massage seats are awesome) but comes with a hefty price tag.
    One whispered past me as I walking alongside a traffic jam this morning. Out of interest what sort of mpg are you expecting from it? My mate in Oslo now has a plug in hybrid XC60 and he is only getting around 33 mpg, he tells me. Maybe he is not optimising the charging, knowing him that's quite likely. But I was able to smugly point out to him that my 5 plus year old DS5 hybrid quite often returns 50mpg (maybe 45 mpg on a long motorway trip).

    Funny enough, I was expecting to change it for a new version next year but it seems there may be no new version of a DS5, which I'm really sad about, I love it. Seems like the only other car that ticks all my boxes is the new Volvo V40, expected next year. I want a hybrid, needs to be a good long distance motorway cruiser, so in the BMW 3 series bracket, 4 wheel drive for the occasional snow, but not an SUV. Any ideas?


  • One whispered past me as I walking alongside a traffic jam this morning. Out of interest what sort of mpg are you expecting from it? My mate in Oslo now has a plug in hybrid XC60 and he is only getting around 33 mpg, he tells me. Maybe he is not optimising the charging, knowing him that's quite likely. But I was able to smugly point out to him that my 5 plus year old DS5 hybrid quite often returns 50mpg (maybe 45 mpg on a long motorway trip).

    Funny enough, I was expecting to change it for a new version next year but it seems there may be no new version of a DS5, which I'm really sad about, I love it. Seems like the only other car that ticks all my boxes is the new Volvo V40, expected next year. I want a hybrid, needs to be a good long distance motorway cruiser, so in the BMW 3 series bracket, 4 wheel drive for the occasional snow, but not an SUV. Any ideas?

    Anywhere between high 20s to mid 50s dependant on what real life review you read. Somewhat different to the 108mpg that Volvo claim.
  • JohnBoyUK said:



    One whispered past me as I walking alongside a traffic jam this morning. Out of interest what sort of mpg are you expecting from it? My mate in Oslo now has a plug in hybrid XC60 and he is only getting around 33 mpg, he tells me. Maybe he is not optimising the charging, knowing him that's quite likely. But I was able to smugly point out to him that my 5 plus year old DS5 hybrid quite often returns 50mpg (maybe 45 mpg on a long motorway trip).

    Funny enough, I was expecting to change it for a new version next year but it seems there may be no new version of a DS5, which I'm really sad about, I love it. Seems like the only other car that ticks all my boxes is the new Volvo V40, expected next year. I want a hybrid, needs to be a good long distance motorway cruiser, so in the BMW 3 series bracket, 4 wheel drive for the occasional snow, but not an SUV. Any ideas?

    Anywhere between high 20s to mid 50s dependant on what real life review you read. Somewhat different to the 108mpg that Volvo claim.
    They are shameless, all the manufacturers. While I do love my DS5, Citroen were equally shameless about claiming that the thing could run on electric only for up to 40kms. The reality? 2. Two.
  • Danepak said:

    Those quick charge machines should only be used in an emergency, pretty sure they destroy your battery.

    A bit of a myth (that's what I've been told anyway).
    Don't full charge your car. Charge it to around 80%.
    I've spoken to people who charges their car more with quick charge than slow charge and they've done it for years with no issues (quick drop in the battery's State of Health)
    Fair enough, you must have better chargers than we do here, I used to use the quick chargers a lot and my battery was knackered after a year,the next one last almost 3 with no quick charges! Icould have just got sold a dud previously though, foreigners are often seen as an easy target here.
    What car? Leaf?
    Sorry to hear about that.
    I took mine to a dealer, who specialises in EVs. Pointless to take it to Nissan, as they're not trained yet.
    He told me to fully charge the car and drive it as close to empty as possible.
    I was worried, as I after 75 km was nearly empty (11 km left) according to the guessometer.
    However, when I plugged it in to a quick charger, the charger showed that I had 27% left!
    I bought a dongle for NZ$15 and now I get an exact reading on my phone.
    Tells me State of Health, how many quick and slow charges, State of Charge etc.
    The Gen 2 models are better at showing how much you've got left on the guessometer, compared to my Gen 1.
    Another major difference between Gen 1 and Gen 2 is the heater. Gen 1 uses way more battery than Gen 2. However, if you charge it at home, you can ask it to start the heater an hour before you leave in the morning and thereby use your home electricity and not the cars.
  • edited November 6

    Danepak said:

    I found a great deal and purchased a Nissan Leaf 2012 (gen 1) for NZ$10k (£5k).
    Battery State of Health was 75.5, but has gone up to 76.2%, after driving it for a week.
    I love it. Absolutely love it.
    Fun to drive and I can't imagine I'll ever buy a petrol car again for work commute.
    I'll slow charge it at home for a full battery. Otherwise there are plenty of quick charge stations across Auckland. 30 mins gives you an 80% full battery.
    A full battery gives me approx 110km, but should be around 120km, if I choose to drive Eco mode.

    You would have to work fairly local would't you. If a full charge gives you 110km (68 miles) then an 80% charge will give you in the region of 81km (50 miles) which equates to 25 miles each way.
    The office is 13km from home, but I drive out to see clients in the Auckland area too. With a slow charge and 100% battery, if generally don't have to charge for a couple of days.
    Yesterday, battery was low (down to 10%), so quick charged while I had lunch. 30 mins later, 80% battery.
  • JiMMy 85 said:

    JohnBoyUK said:

    Beardface said:

    I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.

    I thought the Ioniq was a hybrid? I noticed they were reasonably cheap on a lease so assumed they were hybrid.
    I'm looking at an Ioniq hybrid on a company employee scheme. I think you can get full electric or hybrid, but I can only get the latter. If anyone has a review I am all ears.

    I had one for a few days while my car was being repaired. Sightlines are horrendous, particularly out the back, but a nice enough car to drive. Like with the Toyota hybrid I felt there was a bit of a lag when putting your foot down from 30mph but that might just be my perception. I'd recommend taking a test drive before purchasing.
  • Danepak said:

    Danepak said:

    I found a great deal and purchased a Nissan Leaf 2012 (gen 1) for NZ$10k (£5k).
    Battery State of Health was 75.5, but has gone up to 76.2%, after driving it for a week.
    I love it. Absolutely love it.
    Fun to drive and I can't imagine I'll ever buy a petrol car again for work commute.
    I'll slow charge it at home for a full battery. Otherwise there are plenty of quick charge stations across Auckland. 30 mins gives you an 80% full battery.
    A full battery gives me approx 110km, but should be around 120km, if I choose to drive Eco mode.

    You would have to work fairly local would't you. If a full charge gives you 110km (68 miles) then an 80% charge will give you in the region of 81km (50 miles) which equates to 25 miles each way.
    The office is 13km from home, but I drive out to see clients in the Auckland area too. With a slow charge and 100% battery, if generally don't have to charge for a couple of days.
    Yesterday, battery was low (down to 10%), so quick charged while I had lunch. 30 mins later, 80% battery.
    Yeh - I had a mobile like that. Couple of years later I couldn't use it unless it was plugged into the mains...
  • addickson said:

    JiMMy 85 said:

    JohnBoyUK said:

    Beardface said:

    I've not tried the Leaf, but I do have a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - does 25-32 miles on electric only depending on how you drive it, whether lights / AC etc. are running, but has a 40l petrol capacity with a 2l engine in it as well, meaning can go as far as you want in it and don't have to worry about recharging on the way. Running on petrol only (when the battery is flat) isn't that efficient (c. 35miles to the gallon), but more than makes up for it if the majority of your driving is around town etc. For perspective, I currently average over 800 miles to the gallon. Quite a bit bigger than the leaf, so really depends on what you're after.

    Alternatively, if you want fully electric, have you thought about Hyundai Ioniq - that's supposed to be a very good alternative.

    I thought the Ioniq was a hybrid? I noticed they were reasonably cheap on a lease so assumed they were hybrid.
    I'm looking at an Ioniq hybrid on a company employee scheme. I think you can get full electric or hybrid, but I can only get the latter. If anyone has a review I am all ears.

    I had one for a few days while my car was being repaired. Sightlines are horrendous, particularly out the back, but a nice enough car to drive. Like with the Toyota hybrid I felt there was a bit of a lag when putting your foot down from 30mph but that might just be my perception. I'd recommend taking a test drive before purchasing.
    Thanks for that! The sightlines thing really bothers me so would like to sit in one before I sign up.
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