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8th August 1918. Battle of Amiens.

One hundred years ago today. The “ Black day of the German Army” and the start of the Hundred Days and the end of WW1.

Comments

  • Arguably, the beginning of modern warfare as the British Army masters the co-ordination of infantry, artillery, tanks and aircraft to devastating affect.

    Huge advances made by the standards of the WW1 (12 miles in some cases) and the beginning of the end as the allies advanced every day for a 100 days up to the armistice on 11 November.

    As Sheffield called it the "Forgotten Victory".
  • edited August 8

    Arguably, the beginning of modern warfare as the British Army masters the co-ordination of infantry, artillery, tanks and aircraft to devastating affect.

    Huge advances made by the standards of the WW1 (12 miles in some cases) and the beginning of the end as the allies advanced every day for a 100 days up to the armistice on 11 November.

    As Sheffield called it the "Forgotten Victory".

    Just a shame it took the Generals four years to work it out!!
  • Arguably, the beginning of modern warfare as the British Army masters the co-ordination of infantry, artillery, tanks and aircraft to devastating affect.

    Huge advances made by the standards of the WW1 (12 miles in some cases) and the beginning of the end as the allies advanced every day for a 100 days up to the armistice on 11 November.

    As Sheffield called it the "Forgotten Victory".

    Just a shame it took the Generals four years to work it out!!
    Others can argue this point better than me, especially Garry Sheffield in Forgotton Victory and Gordon Corrigan in Mud, Blood and Poppycock but the generals didn't have the materials, in terms of tanks and aircraft, for example, before then. They had to learn how to overcome a German army and their military hardware that was in an ideal situation to defend (high ground, on foreign soil, defensive capacity of current arms greater than current attacking arms.)

    It will be interesting to see how much the narrative now and up to and on 11/11/2018 is about the lost generation, slaughter on the somme, lions lead by donkeys etc etc and how much about the crushing defeat inflicted on the German army due to mastery of tactics and co-ordination.
  • edited August 8
    The 8 August, the start of the 100 days Advance to Victory, would just not have been possible at any stage earlier in the war.

    The combination of weakening German morale and materials, (the Royal Naval contribution is often overlooked) the huge efforts by US and French troops in the July further south that started a German decline and the appliance of efficient BEF doctrine, learnt from previous battles and honed to a standard unthinkable to even todays army all led to the breakthrough no-one felt possible.

    Generals such as Walter Braithwaite, Arthur Solly Flood, Henry Tudor, Gerald Boyd, Arthur Currie and John Monash shined under the effective leadership of Douglas Haig and his 4th Army commander, Rawlinson in particular.

    A quite incredible day and one I am glad is being remembered by the media.

    Add to the list of books that Andy & Ben mentioned Winning the War by Jonathan Boff. Academia and serious study today is united in the same conclusion that was reached at the end of the conflict, that the Great War in 1918 was won because of Allied military leadership, not in spite of it.

    The revisionary, incompetent General view came in the late 50'/60s and says far more about the time it was written than the Great War itself.
  • It should also be noted that along side the AIF and CEF divisions, London had 3 divisions (47th, 56th and 58th) at the tip of the spear in this battle and fighting over the most complex terrain.
  • Fascinating area to the east of Amiens (where the Battle of the Somme took place)...not to be confused with the Battle of Amiens. If you ever get the chance it's an area well worth visiting in particular the war museum in Peronne.
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