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Advice needed = Learner driver insurance claim

Having no luck with cars at the moment. Our son is learning to drive. His instructor suggested we got learner driver insurance and took him out in our car for experience before his test. We did this, and he has been doing well, but he got a bit phased by a road closure in StAlbans this afternoon, turned in the road with a bit of a slope and rolled into a lamp post. Obviously our insurance is protected - Learner insurance is with another company, but will it have a detrimental effect on him insurance wise going forwards. As a young new driver he wont have a no claims bonus to lose?

Trying to work out if it is best to claim or front the cost of the repair myself. Fair bit of bodywork damage - front wing, lights, bumper and bonnet for a reasonably slow collison! I'd rather pay though than affect him adversely.

Any advice gratefully received.

Comments

  • Mechanically car is fine- was able to drive it home!
  • No claims won't be an issue but It'll push his premium up for 3-5 years if claimed. Not sure how much of a difference it makes cost wise
  • That's what I am worried about - would want to avoid that.
  • He should check with his insurance company I'd say. (no expert).
  • He will have to declare the accident when taking out new insurance once he's passed his test and therefore the underwriting of the risk will be the same. If he lies on his insurance application then he's committing insurance fraud and if found out could invalidate the contract (and cause far bigger issues in the future).

    Insurance contracts are taken out on the principle of "utmost good faith" - so he will need to declare the accident either way if the insurer asks.

    On that basis may as well claim unless he's prepared to lie on his application.

    If that is palatable then best bet is to call your own insurer and ask the question as to whether they take it into account for a new driver. No impact on your insurance and will get an idea of future cost to your son.
  • But if I fix it, then there is nothing to declare. If you have a minor accident and fix it yourself you don't declare it.
  • Beardface said:

    He will have to declare the accident when taking out new insurance once he's passed his test and therefore the underwriting of the risk will be the same. If he lies on his insurance application then he's committing insurance fraud and if found out could invalidate the contract (and cause far bigger issues in the future).

    Insurance contracts are taken out on the principle of "utmost good faith" - so he will need to declare the accident either way if the insurer asks.

    On that basis may as well claim unless he's prepared to lie on his application.

    If that is palatable then best bet is to call your own insurer and ask the question as to whether they take it into account for a new driver. No impact on your insurance and will get an idea of future cost to your son.

    Sadly this is true. The question related to history on an insurance application is now ‘have you had an accident, regardless of fault or a claim being made, in the past 5 years?’

    How they would prove you’ve had an accident however I don’t know.
  • Bit unfair on somebody learning too. You shouldn't be judged on making a little mistake under these circumstances.
  • Claim it. Explain the accident. Make sure your son declares it when he insures himself, after passing his test. It's the whole reason you pay for insurance in the first place.

    It might cost a bit more in cash terms immediately. But lying, covering up and making fraudulent statements might well cost much, much more down the line.

    Your son is learning to drive. So now is the perfect time to help him learn some tough lessons that'll save him agro later in life.
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  • If you're fixing it yourself and you're not making a claim etc, then - technically (well, legally) - you should still declare it, but they'll never know, so I (as an ex insurance company employee) would just keep quiet... If you mention it/claim on his insurance, his premiums will go up (it's going to be expensive anyway) and if you mention it/claim for it on yours, yours will go up...

  • Bit unfair on somebody learning too. You shouldn't be judged on making a little mistake under these circumstances.

    The insurance industry collects data going back many years. These show that someone who has had an accident - whether fault or non-fault - is much more likely to have a further accident. They will therefore bump up the premium to compensate for the almost inevitable extra risk. In their view, someone that "makes a little mistake" is more likely to make another one which will cost them money.

    Of course, there's the "pay for it yourself and don't declare option"...but if found out it would almost certainly lead to a live policy being cancelled and probable refusal of the risk by any other companies in the future. The car insurance industry shares data through the Motor Insurers Bureau (MIB). An organisation that manages the motor insurers database (MID) on behalf of the industry and shares data with the Police Forces and DVLA.
  • I know that, when I changed profession my premiums went up for no other reason than people in my new occupation have more accidents than my previous occupation even though I don't drive my car any more than I did, probably less as we have a van. Thanks for your advice, I will sort it out from here.
  • Fix it yourself and forget it ever happened.

    Best advice I can give too.

    Have had an accident myself and luckily enough, convinced the other person not to claim, and they didn’t, their car barely had a scratch, but mine was pretty bad in the scheme of things and in comparison. Fixed it up myself and didn’t have to declare.

    For minor things (even if the damage isn’t good right now) insurances for younger people is a joke as it is, companies won’t care and you’ll find insurance being well up in the regions of £3000 if you tell them.

    If it is a problem you can fix yourself or know anyone who is a bodywork guy or whatever, it’ll probably be much cheaper both short and long term if you do it that way rather than claim.
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