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Favourite Aria

Thought I'd kick this one off with one for the Azzurri.
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  • edited November 14
    Nessum Dorma, gives me chills
  • The one from Carmen, that Del boy whistles to
  • Ave Maria.
  • Flower duet or that one from Madame butterfly - un Bel di? One fine day in English anyway. Famously used in the Simpsons for Barney's entrant to the Springfield film festival.
  • Excellent thread, for me Puccini is unsurpassed with E Lucevan le Stella from Tosca my number 1

  • Can't beat a bit of Puccini

  • Second vote for Flower Duet.
  • It's not often that I recommend an Henglish aria, but Dido's Lament by Purcell is unbelievable beauty. Dedicated to my late Greyhound Chewy.
  • edited November 14
    Che gelida manina from La Boheme.

    Puccini could write a banging tune!
  • Aria Giovanni
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  • Spose that means I can’t have this

    O Fortuna-Carl Orff-Carmina Burana


  • Spose that means I can’t have this

    O Fortuna-Carl Orff-Carmina Burana


    Referee! A whole chorus in a thread about arias? Come on... I was pushing it with a duet. :wink:
  • PS - Great chorus it is though!
  • Spose that means I can’t have this

    O Fortuna-Carl Orff-Carmina Burana


    Referee! A whole chorus in a thread about arias? Come on... I was pushing it with a duet. :wink:
    All in love is fair...
  • edited November 14
    summertime - by George Gershwin (lyrics DuBose and Dorothy Heyward) plenty of choices for the cover. Janis Joplin, ellie Fitzgerald, billie holiday, mahalia Jackson and of course the fun boy three.



  • Gershwin is a winner, love Rhapsody in Blue
  • Flower Duet but also Barcarolle from Tales of Hoffman ever since saw the Italian film Life is Beautiful about the child in the concentration camp.
  • Das lied Von Der erde - Das Abshied
  • Nice thread. I love a good aria but never know what they're called, so I've the basis of a good playlist here.
    Classic CL too.
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  • Uboat said:

    Nice thread. I love a good aria but never know what they're called, so I've the basis of a good playlist here.
    Classic CL too.

    Yes impressed by the depth of knowledge as was expecting it to be more "That one from the football in 1990...or the Cornetto one"!

    Talking of which I love the use of Nessun Dorma in this Pirelli advert which predates Italia 90 which "popularised" this aria



  • E lucevan le stelle hard to beat.

    What about Sull'aria from the Marriage of Figaro (as in Shawshank Redemption)?

  • E lucevan le stelle hard to beat.

    What about Sull'aria from the Marriage of Figaro (as in Shawshank Redemption)?

    I wouldn't disagree.
  • The Habanera is always a classic. A little cliche, but as entrance arias go, it's immense. The descending chromatic motif is characteristic of - and defining of, in music of the era - women, and sexiness, and ooh-la-la, and heat, and passion. Banging tune. Here it is:

  • edited November 14
    So many great choices, even the dodgy penalty aria by Ronaldo...
    This next one is from the opera Tristan and Isolde by Wagner. not an aria, but PaddyP17 will be able to explain the significance of the 'Tristan Chord' to western music.
    For me this piece of music is heaven.
    Written by a C_ _ t...
  • I love Charlton Life. Threads ranging from "how big’s yer knob??" to this. It's all here.
  • Just one Cornetto
  • So many great choices, even the dodgy penalty aria by Ronaldo...
    This next one is from the opera Tristan and Isolde by Wagner. not an aria, but PaddyP17 will be able to explain the significance of the 'Tristan Chord' to western music.
    For me this piece of music is heaven.
    Written by a C_ _ t...

    What a piece of music this is. For me though, I always go to the Prelude to Act I of Lohengrin. Shame that such a massive wanker wrote such beautiful stuff:



    As for the Tristan chord - what a phenomenon that is. I can't give a quick summary without missing lots and lots of interesting stuff out - I wish I could, but it's such a significant step in how harmony came to be approached and understood that it necessitates article-length analysis at the least. I'll try and sum up the key points though.

    It's not an unusual chord, but the context in which it is placed makes it special. Basically, those four notes come out of nowhere. The musical movement leading up to it is fairly harmonically conventional, and then BAM the Tristan chord comes in. There's no real relationship to what preceded it, and the dramatic pause after the chord emphasises the fact.

    Music theorists loved it. It effectively opened the gateway to atonality - which means music without a set key, effectively, and no identifiable harmonic base. Pierrot Lunaire by Schoenberg is a good example.

    Hope I've done a decent enough job there, but the Wikipedia article is much more informative.
  • I love Charlton Life. Threads ranging from "how big’s yer knob??" to this. It's all here.

    Not forgetting who puts your bins out ?
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