Attention: Please take a moment to consider our terms and conditions before posting.

Last time The Cornish came to town

edited November 1 in General Charlton
There is a plaque on the wall of Greenwich Park marking the last time a large group of Cornishmen came to our neck of the woods. It didn’t turn out well for them then, culminating with their defeat at The Battle of Blackheath on 17th June 1497.
Tin miners down on the Lizard peninsula were angered by increased taxes being levied by Henry VII to wage a war in Scotland. Led by a blacksmith Michael Joseph and a lawyer Thomas Flamank they incited Cornishmen to take up arms against The King. Marching from the South West they gathered recruits along the way including the noble James Touchet the 7th Baron Audley. Gathering at Blackheath they had hoped to be joined by men from Kent who had participated in similar insurrections under Wat Tyler and Jack Cade, sadly for them, they didn’t show up.
London was in panic though with the Royal family moving to the safety of The Tower of London, Henry diverted his force on route north to defend the capital. He made it be known that he would attack on the Monday, but moved his forces against the Cornishmen at dawn on his “lucky day” Saturday 17th June. Inexperienced, outnumbered and out manoeuvred and lacking any cavalry or artillery the Cornishmen were soon put to flight, with maybe as many as 2000 killed. By 2pm Henry was back in the City in triumph knighting deserving parties along the way.
Of the leaders Michael Joseph and Thomas Flamark were hanged at Tyburn whilst Baron Audley being a peer of the realm was beheaded in The Tower. Their heads were displayed on pike staffs on London Bridge.
They’ll be hoping for a better result this time around.

Read more if this sort of thing doesn't bore you: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornish_rebellion_of_1497

Comments

  • PENINSULA!!!!!!!!
  • Love a good historical insurrection. Although...maybe check Wat Tyler's dates and then work out whether anyonenwoukd have fought under both him and this... ;)
  • Nicking that for the Museum Twitter account excellent stuff.

    Also isn't there a song about 20,00 Cornish men
  • Nicking that for the Museum Twitter account excellent stuff.

    Also isn't there a song about 20,00 Cornish men

    They are a feisty lot down there.
    I’d not heard of the song before, but it’s ‘The Song of the Western Man’ or ‘The Trelawny’

    A good sword and a trusty hand!
    A merry heart and true!
    King James's men shall understand
    What Cornish lads can do!
    And have they fixed the where and when?
    And shall Trelawny die?
    Here's twenty thousand Cornish men
    Will know the reason why!

    Apparently they sing it at rugger matches and other Cornish gatherings, and probably about John Trelawny imprisoned in the 17th Century.
  • It is about Trelawney, one of the 7 bishops who were imprisoned by James II for petitioning against James' declaration of tolerance towards Catholics.
  • Leuth said:

    Love a good historical insurrection. Although...maybe check Wat Tyler's dates and then work out whether anyonenwoukd have fought under both him and this... ;)

    It doesn't claim that they would have. Read it again.
  • HarryLime said:

    There is a plaque on the wall of Greenwich Park marking the last time a large group of Cornishmen came to our neck of the woods. It didn’t turn out well for them then, culminating with their defeat at The Battle of Blackheath on 17th June 1497.
    Tin miners down on the Lizard peninsula were angered by increased taxes being levied by Henry VII to wage a war in Scotland. Led by a blacksmith Michael Joseph and a lawyer Thomas Flamank they incited Cornishmen to take up arms against The King. Marching from the South West they gathered recruits along the way including the noble James Touchet the 7th Baron Audley. Gathering at Blackheath they had hoped to be joined by men from Kent who had participated in similar insurrections under Wat Tyler and Jack Cade, sadly for them, they didn’t show up.
    London was in panic though with the Royal family moving to the safety of The Tower of London, Henry diverted his force on route north to defend the capital. He made it be known that he would attack on the Monday, but moved his forces against the Cornishmen at dawn on his “lucky day” Saturday 17th June. Inexperienced, outnumbered and out manoeuvred and lacking any cavalry or artillery the Cornishmen were soon put to flight, with maybe as many as 2000 killed. By 2pm Henry was back in the City in triumph knighting deserving parties along the way.
    Of the leaders Michael Joseph and Thomas Flamark were hanged at Tyburn whilst Baron Audley being a peer of the realm was beheaded in The Tower. Their heads were displayed on pike staffs on London Bridge.
    They’ll be hoping for a better result this time around.

    Read more if this sort of thing doesn't bore you: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornish_rebellion_of_1497

    Interesting thanks for posting
Sign In or Register to comment.