Attention: Please take a moment to consider our terms and conditions before posting.

Structural Engineer?

Can anyone recommend a local (Bexleyheath/ Belvedere preferably) structural engineer? I've been told i need freeholders consent to have a non-supporting wall down in my flat (opening up kitchen to lounge) and for that they need a letter from an structural engineer to confirm the wall is not load bearing. I've contacted the 3 most local ones on the register of structural engineers with no responses so far. The freeholder is also charging £300 for the approval process and they are notorious for being difficult so i really need a registered one so I know i'm getting a decent job first time. I accept it can't be too attractive a job for someone but grateful for any pointers..!
Cheers,
SA

Comments

  • Does anyone need to know?
  • Had been thinking could just do it but there's a risk as its a condition of my lease not to 'maim or alter' walls or layout. if the freeholder finds out the lease would be invalidated and they can then terminate the lease (worse case scenario so i read via google).

    Also when I come to sell the flat the buyers solicitor should look for permission/ license from the freeholder and without it the value of the flat is jeopardised. All in all would rather try to do it by the book.
  • Under no circumstances do it without permission.
    When you come to move you will be in a world of shite
  • edited April 2017

    Under no circumstances do it without permission.
    When you come to move you will be in a world of shite

    But if the wall is not load bearing, then when it comes to selling, any engineers report to the buyer won't come back with anything negative.
    The property certainly won't be sold with a set of build drawings.

    My point being, how will anyone know that the wall ever existed in the first place?
    What would be worst case scenario? Put a stud wall up in order to sell?

    It will be cheaper to replace a stud wall than the reports etc that you have previously mentioned.
  • Under no circumstances do it without permission.
    When you come to move you will be in a world of shite

    But if the wall is not load bearing, then when it comes to selling, any engineers report to the buyer won't come back with anything negative.
    The property certainly won't be sold with a set of build drawings.

    My point being, how will anyone know that the wall ever existed in the first place?
    What would be worst case scenario? Put a stud wall up in order to sell?
    Totally agree with you
  • Under no circumstances do it without permission.
    When you come to move you will be in a world of shite

    But if the wall is not load bearing, then when it comes to selling, any engineers report to the buyer won't come back with anything negative.
    The property certainly won't be sold with a set of build drawings.

    My point being, how will anyone know that the wall ever existed in the first place?
    What would be worst case scenario? Put a stud wall up in order to sell?
    Blackpool72 is absolutely right. I have a leaseholder going mental because they made unapproved alterations and can't sell because of this. And are being expected to restore at their cost, some £12,000 or so. Before they can then get clearance to sell.
    Follow what your lease says.
  • Live a little, your only here once
  • Under no circumstances do it without permission.
    When you come to move you will be in a world of shite

    But if the wall is not load bearing, then when it comes to selling, any engineers report to the buyer won't come back with anything negative.
    The property certainly won't be sold with a set of build drawings.

    My point being, how will anyone know that the wall ever existed in the first place?
    What would be worst case scenario? Put a stud wall up in order to sell?

    on the deeds and lease is usually a plan of the flat, it will show a wall between the kitchen and living room. During the survey/searches it would or should be picked up that a wall is missing.
    Yes, the wall could be replaced to sell but doing it properly in the first place is best.
    The freeholders fee is for a licence to alter.
  • edited April 2017
    Fumbluff said:
    Fumbluff, thank you :smile: . Fortunately they have said they'll accept my own sketch, which wont reach the fine level of detail of your skills. Lucky for me, can download and mark a copy of the floorplan used in the ad for the flat so there's a cost saving.
    All I'm going to need is the engineer's statement that the wall is not supporting. I expect that will cost a couple of hundred just for that.
    I can get some value from the £300 freeholder licence by also requesting their permission for a new front door and any other significant changes under the one license.
    Flats eh?!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Roland Out!