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Multiple car insurance query

Have a run of the mill astra that the wife and I are insured on and pay £35 a month on the insurance. In the process of buying an additional one which is newer and slightly bigger and will be keeping the old one as well. Just been getting quotes and to insure the new one it is coming out as £70 a month. So we would be paying £35 on the older car and £70 on the new one each month. Both are second hand and nothing flash.

I'm pretty green about this sort of stuff and didn't know for example that your no claims bonus can only be used against one car at a time hence why the new one is coming out at double the cost. Are we missing a trick here before we commit to paying this? Seems a bit ridiculous that you have a ncb but only applies to one car.

Many thanks

Comments

  • I think that's standard

    look into multicar policies. my one with admiral is way, way cheaper than 2 policies from anywhere else- I get my no claims applied but it's still effectively just to one of the cars
  • Just buying my first ever car after having a work car for 15 years so the world of car insurance is new to me too.

    I have just found out that having had a licence for 23 years, never having had an accident in all that time, I am getting penalised because 2 people drove into my car whilst it was parked outside my house and drove away without leaving their details.

    Apparently, as I claimed on my works insurance this makes the accidents my fault despite the fact I was not in the car at the time and purely because my insurer had to pay out given the dishonesty of others.

    Absolutely mental to me and means the fuckwits who were dishonest and drove away win over the honest bloke who reported the accidents, paid 2 lots of excess and would never dream of not taking personal responsibility over an accident they had caused as that is the right thing to do morally.

    (Apologies for the rant but I am really miffed about this).
  • Can you not apply your no claims to one car and your wife's to the other car? You could then each be named drivers too on the one you do not apply your no claims to.
  • LenGlover said:

    Can you not apply your no claims to one car and your wife's to the other car? You could then each be named drivers too on the one you do not apply your no claims to.

    ncb is only earned by the policyholder, not a named driver so only one of them will have it
  • edited April 2017
    rina said:

    LenGlover said:

    Can you not apply your no claims to one car and your wife's to the other car? You could then each be named drivers too on the one you do not apply your no claims to.

    ncb is only earned by the policyholder, not a named driver so only one of them will have it
    Direct Line definitely allows named drivers to accrue no claims entitlement if they subsequently take their own policy with them and I understand other companies do too but can only speak of Direct Line.

    My oldest daughter was a named driver on my policy for some years and had built up full no claims entitlement when she acquired her own car in her own name.

    https://www.directline.com/car-insurance/discounts/named-driver-no-claims

  • Admiral do a decent multi car policy I believe.
  • Only cheap(er) way of doing a second car is to get one that can qualify for classic car insurance (which generally requires a limited mileage, say under 5k per year). Clearly this only applies to older vehicles, but on classic policies no claims bonus is not accrued or required. I have a few cars / bangers, ahem, and whilst my daily driver attracts a no claims bonus, my other cars are all on classic policies (and much cheaper to insure). In my case multicar policies are more expensive to insure.

    Daily driver
    1995 Peugeot 205 £400 per year. 15 years no claims. No points. 2 x 40's drivers in high risk postcode.
    Classic policies
    1985 Land Rover £190
    2001 Mercedes CLK £230
  • Thanks very much all. Cheers Len will give direct line a bell.
  • Just buying my first ever car after having a work car for 15 years so the world of car insurance is new to me too.

    I have just found out that having had a licence for 23 years, never having had an accident in all that time, I am getting penalised because 2 people drove into my car whilst it was parked outside my house and drove away without leaving their details.

    Apparently, as I claimed on my works insurance this makes the accidents my fault despite the fact I was not in the car at the time and purely because my insurer had to pay out given the dishonesty of others.

    Absolutely mental to me and means the fuckwits who were dishonest and drove away win over the honest bloke who reported the accidents, paid 2 lots of excess and would never dream of not taking personal responsibility over an accident they had caused as that is the right thing to do morally.

    (Apologies for the rant but I am really miffed about this).

    It doesn't make it your fault at all. There's a clue in that it's called a no claims bonus, rather than a no own fault accidents bonus. In the same way, if someone nicks your motor, it's not your fault but the insurer still has to pay out.

    In addition, the insurers now know that you park up overnight in a place where your car is at serious risk of getting hit (yet again). That's going to cost you money I'm afraid. Premia are always lower if you park overnight on your own drive or, better still, in a garage.
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  • ^ first paragraph is not quite true I think @cafcfan - I did not expect any ncb as I had never had insurance in my name before so not accrued any. What I did not expect was that the policies being offered would be jacked up 3 fold plus because, as I have now been told 3 times, the claim was an 'at fault claim' purely because there was no one to blame as they had scarpered. Hence the insurers do reflect these incedents as 'my fault' in their price. One even admitted that had I had 10 at fault accidents a year for the first 20 years but then had 3 'lucky years' without an accident the quote would be 3 times less !

    Unfortunately you need planning for a driveway on my road and that would not be given to anyone now as I have asked. That being said, I have now lived there 9 years and apart from these 2 recent occasions this has only happened one other time to any of my near neighbours. Not sure if that makes it a place at serious risk (3 times in 9 years across probably 40 odd neighbours) or not. I think it is bad luck personally but see your point there.
  • LenGlover said:

    rina said:

    LenGlover said:

    Can you not apply your no claims to one car and your wife's to the other car? You could then each be named drivers too on the one you do not apply your no claims to.

    ncb is only earned by the policyholder, not a named driver so only one of them will have it
    Direct Line definitely allows named drivers to accrue no claims entitlement if they subsequently take their own policy with them and I understand other companies do too but can only speak of Direct Line.

    My oldest daughter was a named driver on my policy for some years and had built up full no claims entitlement when she acquired her own car in her own name.

    https://www.directline.com/car-insurance/discounts/named-driver-no-claims

    that's handy to know a way of getting affordable insurance for a teenager
  • Admiral multi car was cheap in my first year - a 4x4 and a Mini Cooper s £500 ish yr 1 in Sidcup - no claims made but £1400 in year 2!! so now on two separate policies both around £300/month just the cheapest from compare the market.
  • Don't try and get a multi car insurance with someone who's had 6 points and a recent 3.5k claim. We've got 3 cars between us but wouldn't dream of having a joint premium with her!
  • edited April 2017
    pickwick said:

    Admiral multi car was cheap in my first year - a 4x4 and a Mini Cooper s £500 ish yr 1 in Sidcup - no claims made but £1400 in year 2!! so now on two separate policies both around £300/month just the cheapest from compare the market.

    This. I'm currently with Elephant (a subsidiary of Admiral) they gave us an unbeatable deal, including a further discount on my motor, to add Mrs cafcfan's car when her current insurance expired. But I'm fully expecting that we'll both have to move on to different insurers in 12 months time. All companies seem to be under the impression that they can just screw over loyal customers with impunity. Mrs cafcfan's insurers whacked up the price by around 40% on the renewal quotation. As soon as she rang them to cancel the price suddenly dropped back to close to last year's quote. She told them, politely, to swivel on it.
    It's fair to say that we are serial switchers for car insurance. Just go with the cheapest on confused.com factoring in the benefits of stuff like EU travel, windscreen excess and voluntary excess, etc. Play them at their own game.

    The thing is though please read though the policy document carefully. For example, my recollection is that Admiral/Elephant have clauses which some might find difficult to live with. For example not paying out if you were drink driving.
  • Can you insure two people on one car via two different insurance companies?
  • Never found a multi-car policy that was better than insuring both cars separately, even Admiral with their much advertised policy.
  • Can you insure two people on one car via two different insurance companies?

    Doubtful. Don't forget that it's really the vehicle and third parties that are insured rather than an individual.

    So here, taken at random is a clause from Zurich's policy booklet: "7. We will not make any payment if there is cover under any other policy."

    So, chances are the other company would have a similar clause and neither would pay out if there was a claim event. Which would be less than useful.

    That said, it may be that in certain circumstances, another policy could be set up with the first insurer's consent. But probably only for certain extras that were not incorporated into the original policy. Like for example use in a country not in the EU or speciality track use insurance.

    An interesting thing about the wording in the Zurich example above, is that in theory, taking, say, AA five star European breakdown cover could be read as invalidating the original insurance because their clause is insufficiently accurate in what it is trying to achieve. That's the sort of ambiguity you get when trying to put complex matters into plain English sometimes.

    That's just an example of how badly (despite whatever fees they pay their lawyers) some insurance policies are drafted. So many of them would be in technical breach of the FCA's rules on "clear, fair and not misleading" that in the example I've just given, it is inevitable that Zurich would fail in any attempt to use that clause to wriggle out of paying a claim and in practice they wouldn't try.
  • Buying insurance is a ridiculous process. My experience:

    Renewal quotes are different to new quotes for the same car with the same insurer.

    Web quotes can vary in price compared to telephone quotes with the same insurer.

    Comparison websites can bring up varying quotes for same insurers.

    It's a matter of finding the cheapest deal, you are happy to pay. I've found luck in insuring two cars and the house with Churchill for a few years, though they increase the renewal price every year. A couple of years ago, a 1L car for a family of four insured dropped from £900 to £200 with them - though that's steadily risen back up to £400 now.

    No claims on anything throughout the whole time.
  • You need to investigate changing annually, to keep the price down. If you remain they will almost certainly bump you, if you can't be bothered to look elsewhere.
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  • You need to investigate changing annually, to keep the price down. If you remain they will almost certainly bump you, if you can't be bothered to look elsewhere.

    I find I get a 'loyalty discount' of £100 + if I phone and complain about the exorbitant increase to my premium.

    That tends to eliminate the need and hassle of changing
  • I apologise unreservedly for starting one of the most boring threads in the history of Charlton Life ;-)
  • I apologise unreservedly for starting one of the most boring threads in the history of Charlton Life ;-)

    Was there a happy ending ?
  • I apologise unreservedly for starting one of the most boring threads in the history of Charlton Life ;-)

    Was there a happy ending ?
    Reasonably thanks ; -). Still daylight robbery but not as painful as originally feared
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