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j Lawrence scandal

FBI now involved, Jennifer will now become the highest paid hollywood actress in history, doesn't make personal burglary right though.
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Comments

  • No, it doesn't but don't they say there's no such thing as bad publicity? As you say, pretty sure this 'scandal' will work out pretty well for Jennifer :)
  • Wouldn't kick her out of bed for farting though would ya
  • Wouldn't kick her out of bed for farting though would ya

    Also what you're saying is you wouldn't have minded falling on top of her in the goal celebrations on Saturday :-)
  • aint got a clue what you lot are on about
  • It's a terrible invasion of privacy but who in their right mind would have nude selfies on their phone or a video of themselves performing a sex act. Ok her phone has been hacked but she could easily have left it in a bar, plane etc. not exactly sensible is it.
  • aint got a clue what you lot are on about

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/29008876
  • aint got a clue what you lot are on about

    Makes a change, normally the other way round ;-))
  • No, it doesn't but don't they say there's no such thing as bad publicity?

    Tell that to the Downton bird with a hampton wedged in her eye socket !

    Lol, not seen that one!
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  • It's a terrible invasion of privacy but who in their right mind would have nude selfies on their phone or a video of themselves performing a sex act.

    *Starts deleting files*

    (I'm joking. I'm a wholesome family man with no vices.)
  • Is it wrong to say though that she looks hot in them pics
  • There was a lot more to come but the leaker got rumbled.
  • Huskaris said:

    There was a lot more to come but the leaker got rumbled.

    He's not been rumbled yet, posted a statement on that 4chan website and said he's on the run and there's more to come. Happy days
  • Where would one find these?

    Just to research if it is a breach of privacy.
  • You might find something if you did an image search on twitter............................
  • Ricky Gervais had it right on Twitter, only a fool would store this sort of stuff on iCloud or any other mass-market cloud storage product.

    If you really insist on taking these sorts of pictures/video then there really is no 100% safe way of storing them - burglars could easily steal iPads/Cameras/USBs even if you choose not to store it in the cloud.
  • If anyone has downloaded the pictures, you might want to get rid of the McKayla Maroney ones as she was under 18 when they were taken...
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  • I don't know who that one is. I was impressed with how arty the girl from Downton abbey went though.
  • J BLOCK said:

    Huskaris said:

    There was a lot more to come but the leaker got rumbled.

    He's not been rumbled yet, posted a statement on that 4chan website and said he's on the run and there's more to come. Happy days
    Unfortunately the entire issue with 4chan is it is difficult to authenticate. I've been on there like a hawk and haven't seen anyone who appears to be him saying that.

    Very happy to be proven wrong!
  • I must say, I had no idea who she was... but I definitely do now.

    She's been a bit daft, after all - this isn't the first time these things have happened. Sadly, you should expect it being in the limelight, but that doesn't make it defensible either. They must feel completely exploited and vulnerable after having everyone see every inch.

    As far as I'm concerned, the book should be thrown at these little pricks and the law should come down on them like a tonne of bricks. Let's face it, we're mainly lads and gentleman on this site - and we can appreciate the finer things in life, like women; and I'm certainly not one to jump on the sexism bandwagon or argue against "Would Ya's" etc. I'm also the last one to jump to the defence of celebrities, who are quite often, morons.

    I just think it's a pretty despicable act to take such intimate things and publish them online before torturing those who you've attacked with the threat of more to come.

    There's likely no talent or sophistication to what they've done either; so their prospects are looking pretty limited too.

    FWIW - I've been cracking up at the jokes on this thread and did glance at the photos yesterday before thinking "meh..".
  • edited September 2014

    Ricky Gervais had it right on Twitter, only a fool would store this sort of stuff on iCloud or any other mass-market cloud storage product.

    If you really insist on taking these sorts of pictures/video then there really is no 100% safe way of storing them - burglars could easily steal iPads/Cameras/USBs even if you choose not to store it in the cloud.

    Yep. 30th August there was a proof of concept released online demonstrating that you could defeat the security precautions of iCloud by brute force*; (i.e attempting thousands of passwords one after the other) by making it appear as though it was the "Find my iPhone" service trying to authenticate. Similarly, Apple were in a spot of bother back in April when it was found that Safari would display a secure (SSL; think banks etc) site as secure - even if it actually wasn't. (An amusing bug from a technical point of view as it was an incredibly simplistic mistake on behalf of the software engineer)

    My point being though, I think a lot of people trust cloud products (and mobile phones) far too much - and trust them with data that they wouldn't even leave on their computer or a USB pen drive.

    I work for a company specialising in clinical and medical records software (cloud based.) as part of the engineering team, naturally there's a lot of security procedures and testing involved - the mind boggles when you see the amount of avenues that are audited on a regular basis. We have to due to contractual and legal obligations regarding the type of data; but do I think most cloud services take it as seriously? No, I dare say they do the minimum required - purely because they're generally looking after photos of cats or pirated music.

    When you're in the limelight and you're an even bigger target - you need to take your security more seriously. I have two factor authentication for pretty much everything I do now - and full disk encryption on my laptop - and I'm a boring git. If I was in the limelight I wouldn't dream of keeping these things laying around.

    *Interestingly, Apple claim that these attacks have had nothing to do with the tool released on the 30th for defeating the iCloud security - but have instead suggested it may have been related to poor choices of security questions. However they also fixed the previous bug today and the number of celebrity victims suggest (to me) that this was an attack utilising an automated tool with very little research done prior - not what Apple's version of events would suggest.
  • LuckyReds said:

    Ricky Gervais had it right on Twitter, only a fool would store this sort of stuff on iCloud or any other mass-market cloud storage product.

    If you really insist on taking these sorts of pictures/video then there really is no 100% safe way of storing them - burglars could easily steal iPads/Cameras/USBs even if you choose not to store it in the cloud.

    Yep. 30th August there was a proof of concept released online demonstrating that you could defeat the security precautions of iCloud by brute force*; (i.e attempting thousands of passwords one after the other) by making it appear as though it was the "Find my iPhone" service trying to authenticate. Similarly, Apple were in a spot of bother back in April when it was found that Safari would display a secure (SSL; think banks etc) site as secure - even if it actually wasn't. (An amusing bug from a technical point of view as it was an incredibly simplistic mistake on behalf of the software engineer)

    My point being though, I think a lot of people trust cloud products (and mobile phones) far too much - and trust them with data that they wouldn't even leave on their computer or a USB pen drive.

    I work for a company specialising in clinical and medical records software (cloud based.) as part of the engineering team, naturally there's a lot of security procedures and testing involved - the mind boggles when you see the amount of avenues that are audited on a regular basis. We have to due to contractual and legal obligations regarding the type of data; but do I think most cloud services take it as seriously? No, I dare say they do the minimum required - purely because they're generally looking after photos of cats or pirated music.

    When you're in the limelight and you're an even bigger target - you need to take your security more seriously. I have two factor authentication for pretty much everything I do now - and full disk encryption on my laptop - and I'm a boring git. If I was in the limelight I wouldn't dream of keeping these things laying around.

    *Interestingly, Apple claim that these attacks have had nothing to do with the tool released on the 30th for defeating the iCloud security - but have instead suggested it may have been related to poor choices of security questions. However they also fixed the previous bug today and the number of celebrity victims suggest (to me) that this was an attack utilising an automated tool with very little research done prior - not what Apple's version of events would suggest.
    Cloud-based security is definitely a major issue, no doubt about it, people make the assumption that their content is safe but it absolutely is not.

    This latest scandal comes at a very interesting time, a lot of the pay TV operators (Sky, Virgin) are looking into the possibility of launching cloud-based DVRs, that is having the content stored in the cloud rather than on the STB HD or the local head-end (server) (this removes a big cost to the pay TV operators) but the big content players get VERY nervous about the security of their content.

    Of course, Sky or Virgin would be using better authentication technology than iCloud or SkyDrive (or whatever the MFST one is called this week) but the same principals remain, if it has a front-door then it can be broken into.
  • edited September 2014
    These people are fucking idiots!

    I'm sorry but who in their right mind would make this stuff available in the Cloud? One may have a penchant for photographing various parts of ones intimate anatomy or feel the need to record oneself in the process of performing a sexual act, but please, has the world lost all common sense? They are almost as culpable as the people who are mining for data like this on the internet.

    (scratches head and wanders off to find something else to do...)
  • edited September 2014
    The arguament "well they shouldn't have taken the/uploaded them in the first place" is a flawed one. An iPhone automatically backs up your photos through iCloud (if you have it turned on) and even if you remove them from your phone they may not be removed from the iCloud servers.

    Due to their line of work a lot of these people are find themselves in long distance relationships, something I understand, and so sometimes the occasional naughty snap could be shared between two people. What we need to remember is that we have no right to be looking at these pictures. The issue here isn't with the fact that these people have taken some dirty pictures, but that iCloud software has let down it's users.

    I'm not going to try and claim some kind of morale high ground though, we have no entitlement to view these images but I still have.

    Edit: Also please make sure you know how cloud software works. You either have it on and so it backs up everything on your phone, or you don't and risk losing everything if your phone gets stolen, damaged etc. Most people are often completely oblivious to the fact that their images and messages are backing up anyway, that doesn't make them "f**king idiots" and mean they are not entitled to do as they wish with their own body in what they had assumed was in privacy.
  • Hmm...not sure about all this.

    On the one hand we have created a culture of celebrity in which some well known 'stars' are very happy to leak pictures, videos, etc, themselves if they think it will further their profile. On the other, from what I can gather, these are the digital equivalent of some scumbag burglar going through the victims property and making what they only ever intended to be private matters very, very public.

    I doubt the general public would still be lapping it up if someone had done the same to them tbh but because these people are famous (apparently) it's okay to circulate them regardless of whether they are of the Paris Hilton approach or not.

    I think if you make your living in the public domain you have to expect your private life to be subject to gossip and scrutiny to a large extent but I'm not sure they deserve this tbh.
  • The arguament "well they shouldn't have taken the/uploaded them in the first place" is a flawed one. An iPhone automatically backs up your photos through iCloud (if you have it turned on) and even if you remove them from your phone they may not be removed from the iCloud servers.

    Due to their line of work a lot of these people are find themselves in long distance relationships, something I understand, and so sometimes the occasional naughty snap could be shared between two people. What we need to remember is that we have no right to be looking at these pictures. The issue here isn't with the fact that these people have taken some dirty pictures, but that iCloud software has let down it's users.

    I'm not going to try and claim some kind of morale high ground though, we have no entitlement to view these images but I still have.

    Edit: Also please make sure you know how cloud software works. You either have it on and so it backs up everything on your phone, or you don't and risk losing everything if your phone gets stolen, damaged etc. Most people are often completely oblivious to the fact that their images and messages are backing up anyway, that doesn't make them "f**king idiots" and mean they are not entitled to do as they wish with their own body in what they had assumed was in privacy.

    You make the most salient point in the last line, "in what they had assumed was privacy" - yep, as they say in the movies "Assumption is the Mother of all Fuck Ups."

    You should never assume anything about technology or the Internet, assuming your photos are safe in the Cloud is like assuming that nice Dr. Shipman is just having a bad run with his patients.

    As you say, you CAN choose to not back up your stuff to iCloud - you could back it up to a more secure location of course - and people (especially rich famous ones) should probably make themselves aware of this before putting close-up pictures of their bearded clam onto their iPad.
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Roland Out!