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Today I will be mostly listening to ....

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  • An annoying South African going on and on and on and on and on and on and on about the cricket (my first day in the office this week)

    :o(
  • edited August 2008
    Arse

    Double post
  • [cite]Posted By: Leroy Ambrose[/cite]An annoying South African going on and on and on and on and on and on and on about the cricket (my first day in the office this week)

    :o(

    An annoying South African going on and on and on and on and on and on and on about the cricket (my first day in the office this week)

    :o(
  • MOG I hope you will be soon be playing on the road again in your own van.
  • minimum maximum - kraftwerk
  • Glastonbury on the telly.
  • Bruise - Little Victories
  • edited June 2014
    inner visions - Stevie Wonder - whilst cleaning my scuzzy kitchen
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  • ella fitzgerald.
  • Cold play while driving to work tonight
  • edited July 2014
    You know how Man leak a bit - in the way that Gong are flabby. The off-shoots of Man are tougher: cop The Neutrons and 'Living in the World Today', 1973, especially for Clive John on spacey synths - but who is playing drums? He is certainly one of the Rockfield stable - Dave Charles, Terry Williams, or Pick Withers?

    Of the insistent Welsh stomp, best of all are Alkatraz - 'Doing a Moonlight', 1978, with Will Youatt on guitar and Stuart Halliday on drums. I watched them live at the Camden Roundhouse - and does anyone else remember that gig beyond Finchley on the Northern Line at Woodhouse Park? - Absolutely bloody gorgeous stuff. There was a connection between Man and the dreamy, drippy, acid West Coast - and this is nothing like it. Alkatraz are Port Talbot meets Detroit, with uptight drumming, D-minor keys, and close harmonies about "Stay out of town ... until the fields turn grey."

    Absolutely bloody superb.
  • shuffle, such an underrated band.
  • Karl Hyde - Edgeland - great album
  • You know how Man leak a bit - in the way that Gong are flabby. The off-shoots of Man are tougher: cop The Neutrons and 'Living in the World Today', 1973, especially for Clive John on spacey synths - but who is playing drums? He is certainly one of the Rockfield stable - Dave Charles, Terry Williams, or Pick Withers?

    Of the insistent Welsh stomp, best of all are Alkatraz - 'Doing a Moonlight', 1978, with Will Youatt on guitar and Stuart Halliday on drums. I watched them live at the Camden Roundhouse - and does anyone else remember that gig beyond Finchley on the Northern Line at Woodhouse Park? - Absolutely bloody gorgeous stuff. There was a connection between Man and the dreamy, drippy, acid West Coast - and this is nothing like it. Alkatraz are Port Talbot meets Detroit, with uptight drumming, D-minor keys, and close harmonies about "Stay out of town ... until the fields turn grey."

    Absolutely bloody superb.

    wow, thanks viewfinder, i hadn't thought of "man" for a while, used to love their "live at the padgett rooms, penarth" album. also their bit on the first live at glastonbury triple album! john peel loved them in the early 70's!
  • edited July 2014

    You know how Man leak a bit - in the way that Gong are flabby. The off-shoots of Man are tougher: cop The Neutrons and 'Living in the World Today', 1973, especially for Clive John on spacey synths - but who is playing drums? He is certainly one of the Rockfield stable - Dave Charles, Terry Williams, or Pick Withers?

    Of the insistent Welsh stomp, best of all are Alkatraz - 'Doing a Moonlight', 1978, with Will Youatt on guitar and Stuart Halliday on drums. I watched them live at the Camden Roundhouse - and does anyone else remember that gig beyond Finchley on the Northern Line at Woodhouse Park? - Absolutely bloody gorgeous stuff. There was a connection between Man and the dreamy, drippy, acid West Coast - and this is nothing like it. Alkatraz are Port Talbot meets Detroit, with uptight drumming, D-minor keys, and close harmonies about "Stay out of town ... until the fields turn grey."

    Absolutely bloody superb.

    wow, thanks viewfinder, i hadn't thought of "man" for a while, used to love their "live at the padgett rooms, penarth" album. also their bit on the first live at glastonbury triple album! john peel loved them in the early 70's!
    Well done, SH2T - You've got a gem there with the Padgett Rooms at Penarth. Don't forget Man at the Patti Pavilion - and somewhere here I've got them live at the Roundhouse with the Welsh Male Voice Choir: lustily now: "SOSPEN FACH! SOSPEN FACH!"

    You'll know there is a particular rhythmic trait to Welsh rock in the 1970s - simple 4/4, with the bass-drum on both on- and off-beats, thudding under the snare. Have a listen to Alkatraz on YouTube - don't be misled by an American band with a similar name - the album is 'Doing a Moonlight', with the opening track 'Stay Out of Town'. Swirling synths resolve to the insistent Welsh stomp. That's Will Youatt on guitar, who was a Man stalwart for many years with Deke Leonard, and listen to Stuart Halliday's uptight drumming.

    Do you remember those Sunday gigs at the Roundhouse, 3 p.m. kick-off with, say, the Global Village Trucking Company, then Principal Edwards Magic Theatre? John Peel signed the latter, a theatrical rock band, to his own Dandelion label, and later said they "terrified" him. A short break, and then The Groundhogs, or the Edgar Broughton Band. I first saw Camel here, in 1973, and was hooked for life: Peter Bardens on Hammond organ, Andy Latimer caning his Les Paul, Andy Ward on drums and Doug Ferguson on bass. And Darryl Way's Wolf - remember them? - recorded three intense albums; Way was a classically trained violinist who came out of Curved Air...
  • You know how Man leak a bit - in the way that Gong are flabby. The off-shoots of Man are tougher: cop The Neutrons and 'Living in the World Today', 1973, especially for Clive John on spacey synths - but who is playing drums? He is certainly one of the Rockfield stable - Dave Charles, Terry Williams, or Pick Withers?

    Of the insistent Welsh stomp, best of all are Alkatraz - 'Doing a Moonlight', 1978, with Will Youatt on guitar and Stuart Halliday on drums. I watched them live at the Camden Roundhouse - and does anyone else remember that gig beyond Finchley on the Northern Line at Woodhouse Park? - Absolutely bloody gorgeous stuff. There was a connection between Man and the dreamy, drippy, acid West Coast - and this is nothing like it. Alkatraz are Port Talbot meets Detroit, with uptight drumming, D-minor keys, and close harmonies about "Stay out of town ... until the fields turn grey."

    Absolutely bloody superb.

    wow, thanks viewfinder, i hadn't thought of "man" for a while, used to love their "live at the padgett rooms, penarth" album. also their bit on the first live at glastonbury triple album! john peel loved them in the early 70's!
    Well done, SH2T - You've got a gem there with the Padgett Rooms at Penarth. Don't forget Man at the Patti Pavilion - and somewhere here I've got them live at the Roundhouse with the Welsh Male Voice Choir: lustily now: "SOSPEN FACH! SOSPEN FACH!"

    You'll know there is a particular rhythmic trait to Welsh rock in the 1970s - simple 4/4, with the bass-drum on both on- and off-beats, thudding under the snare. Have a listen to Alkatraz on YouTube - don't be misled by an American band with a similar name - the album is 'Doing a Moonlight', with the opening track 'Stay Out of Town'. Swirling synths resolve to the insistent Welsh stomp. That's Will Youatt on guitar, who was a Man stalwart for many years with Deke Leonard, and listen to Stuart Halliday's uptight drumming.

    Do you remember those Sunday gigs at the Roundhouse, 3 p.m. kick-off with, say, the Global Village Trucking Company, then Principal Edwards Magic Theatre? John Peel signed the latter, a theatrical rock band, to his own Dandelion label, and later said they "terrified" him. A short break, and then The Groundhogs, or the Edgar Broughton Band. I first saw Camel here, in 1973, and was hooked for life: Peter Bardens on Hammond organ, Andy Latimer caning his Les Paul, Andy Ward on drums and Doug Ferguson on bass. And Darryl Way's Wolf - remember them? - recorded three intense albums; Way was a classically trained violinist who came out of Curved Air...
    went to a few roundhouse extravaganzas in the early 70's, well remember principal edwards, global village truckers, bought the early dandelion releases, chanting "out demons out" to the edgar broughton, but for me the standouts from those years were the groundhogs - an especially tight & threatening, but still progressive unit, "cherry red" just doesn't date. just going off to re-discover alcatraz now, thx....
  • I Have Alcatrazz - Live Sentence & Alcatrazz - Alcatrazz Both Good albums imo. Favourite Man LP Is Back to the Future. Favourite welsh Band Budgie.
  • Badger said:

    I Have Alcatrazz - Live Sentence & Alcatrazz - Alcatrazz Both Good albums imo. Favourite Man LP Is Back to the Future. Favourite welsh Band Budgie.

    yes, back to the future was man's coming of age, but wow, budgie over man as best welsh band of the early 70's, now that's a controversial call...though simon church rolls it harmlessly into the keeper's hands, sigh...
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  • Badger said:

    I Have Alcatrazz - Live Sentence & Alcatrazz - Alcatrazz Both Good albums imo. Favourite Man LP Is Back to the Future. Favourite welsh Band Budgie.

    Ah, but the double 'z' identifies the American band. The Welsh Alkatraz produced one album on United Artists, 1978 - I've got it on vinyl - available rather expensively as a CD on import I think.

    Thought you might contribute to this, Badger. Ah yes, Budgie at the Croydon Greyhound on a Sunday night in the 70s. I like Burke Shelley, the founder, bass-player and vocalist; apparently he's not in the best of health, though they toured eastern Europe, where they have a huge following, not so long ago.

    The Neutrons borrowed various former- and future-members of Man; the Welsh scene was all very incestuous. They produced two albums: Black Hole Star, and Tales from the Blue Cocoons. Both good: pleasantly trippy, folky, "I'm going to India" stuff, slightly reminiscent of Traffic. Saw them at the London School of Economics in 1977.

    One Welsh band I never did see was Help Yourself. They played pub gigs quite regularly in London, I believe; did you ever cop them, Badger? They morphed into The Tyla Gang, fronted by Sean Tyla, who famously whispered in the ear of his guitarist, mid-song at Dingwall's: "I think I'm having a nervous breakdown." He left the stage and has never performed since!

    What's the first proper band you ever saw? I've often thought that would be a good thread on this site. We had a band play at the end of summer-term ball at my school, St Dunstan's College, in Catford; it was here that I saw Atomic Rooster (with Vincent Crane on Hammond organ) in about 1970. The following summer was the Sutherland Brothers and Quiver, with the very good Willie Wilson on drums.

  • You know how Man leak a bit - in the way that Gong are flabby. The off-shoots of Man are tougher: cop The Neutrons and 'Living in the World Today', 1973, especially for Clive John on spacey synths - but who is playing drums? He is certainly one of the Rockfield stable - Dave Charles, Terry Williams, or Pick Withers?

    Of the insistent Welsh stomp, best of all are Alkatraz - 'Doing a Moonlight', 1978, with Will Youatt on guitar and Stuart Halliday on drums. I watched them live at the Camden Roundhouse - and does anyone else remember that gig beyond Finchley on the Northern Line at Woodhouse Park? - Absolutely bloody gorgeous stuff. There was a connection between Man and the dreamy, drippy, acid West Coast - and this is nothing like it. Alkatraz are Port Talbot meets Detroit, with uptight drumming, D-minor keys, and close harmonies about "Stay out of town ... until the fields turn grey."

    Absolutely bloody superb.

    wow, thanks viewfinder, i hadn't thought of "man" for a while, used to love their "live at the padgett rooms, penarth" album. also their bit on the first live at glastonbury triple album! john peel loved them in the early 70's!
    Well done, SH2T - You've got a gem there with the Padgett Rooms at Penarth. Don't forget Man at the Patti Pavilion - and somewhere here I've got them live at the Roundhouse with the Welsh Male Voice Choir: lustily now: "SOSPEN FACH! SOSPEN FACH!"

    You'll know there is a particular rhythmic trait to Welsh rock in the 1970s - simple 4/4, with the bass-drum on both on- and off-beats, thudding under the snare. Have a listen to Alkatraz on YouTube - don't be misled by an American band with a similar name - the album is 'Doing a Moonlight', with the opening track 'Stay Out of Town'. Swirling synths resolve to the insistent Welsh stomp. That's Will Youatt on guitar, who was a Man stalwart for many years with Deke Leonard, and listen to Stuart Halliday's uptight drumming.

    Do you remember those Sunday gigs at the Roundhouse, 3 p.m. kick-off with, say, the Global Village Trucking Company, then Principal Edwards Magic Theatre? John Peel signed the latter, a theatrical rock band, to his own Dandelion label, and later said they "terrified" him. A short break, and then The Groundhogs, or the Edgar Broughton Band. I first saw Camel here, in 1973, and was hooked for life: Peter Bardens on Hammond organ, Andy Latimer caning his Les Paul, Andy Ward on drums and Doug Ferguson on bass. And Darryl Way's Wolf - remember them? - recorded three intense albums; Way was a classically trained violinist who came out of Curved Air...
    went to a few roundhouse extravaganzas in the early 70's, well remember principal edwards, global village truckers, bought the early dandelion releases, chanting "out demons out" to the edgar broughton, but for me the standouts from those years were the groundhogs - an especially tight & threatening, but still progressive unit, "cherry red" just doesn't date. just going off to re-discover alcatraz now, thx....
    I like your description of The Groundhogs: "Tight and threatening". Yeah. I still like Caravan, favour their 1973 album 'For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night'; I first saw them at around this time, at the Marquee in Wardour Street. Their very good drummer, Richard Coughlan, died recently; Mark Walker has replaced him and the band continue to play occasional gigs and festivals.

  • edited July 2014
    Regarding Caravan, Soft Machine and the Canterbury Scene, Henry Irving made a very good quip recently. We were discussing standing in the seated areas of grounds, and someone said you can't sing when you're sitting down. And Henry said Robert Wyatt manages it rather well.

    [Wyatt, ex-Softs drummer and singer, fell out of a window on acid and ended up in a wheelchair for life, but pursues a successful solo career.]
  • You know how Man leak a bit - in the way that Gong are flabby. The off-shoots of Man are tougher: cop The Neutrons and 'Living in the World Today', 1973, especially for Clive John on spacey synths - but who is playing drums? He is certainly one of the Rockfield stable - Dave Charles, Terry Williams, or Pick Withers?

    Of the insistent Welsh stomp, best of all are Alkatraz - 'Doing a Moonlight', 1978, with Will Youatt on guitar and Stuart Halliday on drums. I watched them live at the Camden Roundhouse - and does anyone else remember that gig beyond Finchley on the Northern Line at Woodhouse Park? - Absolutely bloody gorgeous stuff. There was a connection between Man and the dreamy, drippy, acid West Coast - and this is nothing like it. Alkatraz are Port Talbot meets Detroit, with uptight drumming, D-minor keys, and close harmonies about "Stay out of town ... until the fields turn grey."

    Absolutely bloody superb.

    wow, thanks viewfinder, i hadn't thought of "man" for a while, used to love their "live at the padgett rooms, penarth" album. also their bit on the first live at glastonbury triple album! john peel loved them in the early 70's!
    went to see man at woolwich poly light years ago, still remember it though.

    highway 61 revisited = bob dylan
  • First Aid Kit
  • This Wild Life and a bit of Red City Radio.
  • Jamie XX - All Under One Roof Raving

  • Led Zep at Texas International pop festival, 69. Plant had one hell of a voice, and guitar playing, well some of it is 'outrageous' as Jeff Beck would quip about Hendrix.
    2 weeks after Woodstock, and on the same bill as Spirit ( Randy California'e estate who are currently suing Led Zep for copyright of 'Stairway'......
    They came on after BB King at this gig, and the sound quality is amazing for a bootleg. Which is more than can be said for Pagey's amp's at the end. Not sure if they were Marshall's or Hiwatt
    HMMT has the 'lemon song' reference so a few references to young ladies, Frankly this group made the mould, despite the rip off's.
    Most Rock band's sound like a piss poor excuse by comparison.
  • Badger said:

    I Have Alcatrazz - Live Sentence & Alcatrazz - Alcatrazz Both Good albums imo. Favourite Man LP Is Back to the Future. Favourite welsh Band Budgie.

    Ah, but the double 'z' identifies the American band. The Welsh Alkatraz produced one album on United Artists, 1978 - I've got it on vinyl - available rather expensively as a CD on import I think.

    Thought you might contribute to this, Badger. Ah yes, Budgie at the Croydon Greyhound on a Sunday night in the 70s. I like Burke Shelley, the founder, bass-player and vocalist; apparently he's not in the best of health, though they toured eastern Europe, where they have a huge following, not so long ago.

    The Neutrons borrowed various former- and future-members of Man; the Welsh scene was all very incestuous. They produced two albums: Black Hole Star, and Tales from the Blue Cocoons. Both good: pleasantly trippy, folky, "I'm going to India" stuff, slightly reminiscent of Traffic. Saw them at the London School of Economics in 1977.

    One Welsh band I never did see was Help Yourself. They played pub gigs quite regularly in London, I believe; did you ever cop them, Badger? They morphed into The Tyla Gang, fronted by Sean Tyla, who famously whispered in the ear of his guitarist, mid-song at Dingwall's: "I think I'm having a nervous breakdown." He left the stage and has never performed since!

    What's the first proper band you ever saw? I've often thought that would be a good thread on this site. We had a band play at the end of summer-term ball at my school, St Dunstan's College, in Catford; it was here that I saw Atomic Rooster (with Vincent Crane on Hammond organ) in about 1970. The following summer was the Sutherland Brothers and Quiver, with the very good Willie Wilson on drums.

    seriously/sincerely "viewfinder", after reading your engaging snippets here on late 60's/early-mid 70's welsh rock scene, you must send something in to allan jones at uncut, or phil alexander at mojo. i would say you had a shot at publication...but maybe you already write for one of the music mags?
  • Mostly techno and minimal lately…

    Adam Beyer – DCR204 podcast
    Gaiser / Matador – Essential Mix (Gaiser especially)
    Dubfire – Live at Time Warp 2014
    Paco Osuna – Liver at Enter. Miami
    Shaded – Live in Strasbourg

    … And various other repetitive, driving and bleeping monstrosities.
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